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Bilinguals implicitly name objects in both their languages: an ERP study.

Von Holzen K, Mani N - Front Psychol (2014)

Bottom Line: The current study tests whether bilinguals implicitly generate picture labels in both of their languages when tested in their L1 with a cross-modal ERP priming paradigm.The results extend previous findings by showing that not just do bilinguals implicitly generate the labels for visually fixated images in both of their languages when immersed in their L1, but also that these implicitly generated labels in one language can prime recognition of subsequently presented auditory targets across languages (i.e., L2-L1).The current study provides support for cascaded models of lexical access during speech production, as well as a new priming paradigm for the study of bilingual language processing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratoire Psychologie de la Perception UMR 8158, Université Paris Descartes Paris, France ; Psychology of Language Research Group, Georg-Elias-Müller Institute of Psychology, University of Göttingen Göttingen, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Upon being presented with a familiar name-known image, monolingual infants and adults implicitly generate the image's label (Meyer et al., 2007; Mani and Plunkett, 2010, 2011; Mani et al., 2012a). Although the cross-linguistic influences on overt bilingual production are well studied (for a summary see Colomé and Miozzo, 2010), evidence that bilinguals implicitly generate the label for familiar objects in both languages remains mixed. For example, bilinguals implicitly generate picture labels in both of their languages, but only when tested in L2 and not L1 (Wu and Thierry, 2011) or when immersed in their L2 (Spivey and Marian, 1999; Marian and Spivey, 2003a,b) but not when immersed in their L1 (Weber and Cutler, 2004). The current study tests whether bilinguals implicitly generate picture labels in both of their languages when tested in their L1 with a cross-modal ERP priming paradigm. The results extend previous findings by showing that not just do bilinguals implicitly generate the labels for visually fixated images in both of their languages when immersed in their L1, but also that these implicitly generated labels in one language can prime recognition of subsequently presented auditory targets across languages (i.e., L2-L1). The current study provides support for cascaded models of lexical access during speech production, as well as a new priming paradigm for the study of bilingual language processing.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Examples of stimuli used in each condition. A prime picture, its corresponding German target word, as well as the English and German translations of these stimuli are given.
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Figure 1: Examples of stimuli used in each condition. A prime picture, its corresponding German target word, as well as the English and German translations of these stimuli are given.

Mentions: In the current study, implicit generation of both language labels was examined by manipulating the relationship between the L1 and L2 labels for the picture prime and the L1 auditory target words. Thus, we included four conditions in the experiment: (1) picture prime labels and L1 target words were identical in L1 German; (2) L1 German labels for the picture primes and L1 target words were phonologically related in German; (3) L2 English labels for the picture primes and L1 target words sounded similar1; (4) L1 and L2 labels for the picture prime and L1 target words were phonologically, orthographically, or semantically unrelated (see Figure 1 for examples). Similar to Wu and Thierry (2011), in trials where picture prime labels and L1 target words were related within- or between-language, the relationship was offset-overlap, which has already been demonstrated to elicit a N400 priming effect in a similar study with monolingual participants (Desroches et al., 2009). In summary, the current study aims to answer two questions:


Bilinguals implicitly name objects in both their languages: an ERP study.

Von Holzen K, Mani N - Front Psychol (2014)

Examples of stimuli used in each condition. A prime picture, its corresponding German target word, as well as the English and German translations of these stimuli are given.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4260478&req=5

Figure 1: Examples of stimuli used in each condition. A prime picture, its corresponding German target word, as well as the English and German translations of these stimuli are given.
Mentions: In the current study, implicit generation of both language labels was examined by manipulating the relationship between the L1 and L2 labels for the picture prime and the L1 auditory target words. Thus, we included four conditions in the experiment: (1) picture prime labels and L1 target words were identical in L1 German; (2) L1 German labels for the picture primes and L1 target words were phonologically related in German; (3) L2 English labels for the picture primes and L1 target words sounded similar1; (4) L1 and L2 labels for the picture prime and L1 target words were phonologically, orthographically, or semantically unrelated (see Figure 1 for examples). Similar to Wu and Thierry (2011), in trials where picture prime labels and L1 target words were related within- or between-language, the relationship was offset-overlap, which has already been demonstrated to elicit a N400 priming effect in a similar study with monolingual participants (Desroches et al., 2009). In summary, the current study aims to answer two questions:

Bottom Line: The current study tests whether bilinguals implicitly generate picture labels in both of their languages when tested in their L1 with a cross-modal ERP priming paradigm.The results extend previous findings by showing that not just do bilinguals implicitly generate the labels for visually fixated images in both of their languages when immersed in their L1, but also that these implicitly generated labels in one language can prime recognition of subsequently presented auditory targets across languages (i.e., L2-L1).The current study provides support for cascaded models of lexical access during speech production, as well as a new priming paradigm for the study of bilingual language processing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratoire Psychologie de la Perception UMR 8158, Université Paris Descartes Paris, France ; Psychology of Language Research Group, Georg-Elias-Müller Institute of Psychology, University of Göttingen Göttingen, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Upon being presented with a familiar name-known image, monolingual infants and adults implicitly generate the image's label (Meyer et al., 2007; Mani and Plunkett, 2010, 2011; Mani et al., 2012a). Although the cross-linguistic influences on overt bilingual production are well studied (for a summary see Colomé and Miozzo, 2010), evidence that bilinguals implicitly generate the label for familiar objects in both languages remains mixed. For example, bilinguals implicitly generate picture labels in both of their languages, but only when tested in L2 and not L1 (Wu and Thierry, 2011) or when immersed in their L2 (Spivey and Marian, 1999; Marian and Spivey, 2003a,b) but not when immersed in their L1 (Weber and Cutler, 2004). The current study tests whether bilinguals implicitly generate picture labels in both of their languages when tested in their L1 with a cross-modal ERP priming paradigm. The results extend previous findings by showing that not just do bilinguals implicitly generate the labels for visually fixated images in both of their languages when immersed in their L1, but also that these implicitly generated labels in one language can prime recognition of subsequently presented auditory targets across languages (i.e., L2-L1). The current study provides support for cascaded models of lexical access during speech production, as well as a new priming paradigm for the study of bilingual language processing.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus