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Squamous papilloma of the hard palate.

Babaji P, Singh V, Chaurasia VR, Masamatti VS, Sharma AM - Indian J Dent (2014)

Bottom Line: As an oral lesion, it raises concern because of its clinical appearance.These lesions commonly occur between age 30 and 50 years, and sometimes can occur before the age of 10 years.Common site predilection for the lesion is the tongue and soft palate, and may occur on any other surface of the oral cavity such as the uvula and vermilion of the lip.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pedodontics, Sharavathi Dental College, Shimoga, Karnataka, India.

ABSTRACT
Oral squamous papillomas are benign proliferating lesions induced by human papilloma virus. These lesions are painless and slowly growing masses. As an oral lesion, it raises concern because of its clinical appearance. These lesions commonly occur between age 30 and 50 years, and sometimes can occur before the age of 10 years. Oral squamous papilloma accounts for 8% of all oral tumors in children. Common site predilection for the lesion is the tongue and soft palate, and may occur on any other surface of the oral cavity such as the uvula and vermilion of the lip. Here, we are presenting a case of squamous papilloma on the palate.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Post-excision area of the palate
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Figure 3: Post-excision area of the palate

Mentions: Intraoral examination revealed the presence of a solitary, well-defined, oval-shaped exophytic growth on the right half of the hard palate measuring 3 × 3 cm in size between the first and second molar regions on the palatal side [Figure 1]. The lesion had a cauliflower-like appearance. It was non-tender, firm in consistency and arose from the underlying soft tissue. The diagnostic hypothesis includes squamous cell carcinoma and verruca vulgaris.[2] The lesion was surgically excised without any post-operative complications [Figure 2]. The excised lesion [Figure 3] was sent for histopathological evaluation, which confirmed the squamous papilloma [Figure 4].


Squamous papilloma of the hard palate.

Babaji P, Singh V, Chaurasia VR, Masamatti VS, Sharma AM - Indian J Dent (2014)

Post-excision area of the palate
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4260387&req=5

Figure 3: Post-excision area of the palate
Mentions: Intraoral examination revealed the presence of a solitary, well-defined, oval-shaped exophytic growth on the right half of the hard palate measuring 3 × 3 cm in size between the first and second molar regions on the palatal side [Figure 1]. The lesion had a cauliflower-like appearance. It was non-tender, firm in consistency and arose from the underlying soft tissue. The diagnostic hypothesis includes squamous cell carcinoma and verruca vulgaris.[2] The lesion was surgically excised without any post-operative complications [Figure 2]. The excised lesion [Figure 3] was sent for histopathological evaluation, which confirmed the squamous papilloma [Figure 4].

Bottom Line: As an oral lesion, it raises concern because of its clinical appearance.These lesions commonly occur between age 30 and 50 years, and sometimes can occur before the age of 10 years.Common site predilection for the lesion is the tongue and soft palate, and may occur on any other surface of the oral cavity such as the uvula and vermilion of the lip.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pedodontics, Sharavathi Dental College, Shimoga, Karnataka, India.

ABSTRACT
Oral squamous papillomas are benign proliferating lesions induced by human papilloma virus. These lesions are painless and slowly growing masses. As an oral lesion, it raises concern because of its clinical appearance. These lesions commonly occur between age 30 and 50 years, and sometimes can occur before the age of 10 years. Oral squamous papilloma accounts for 8% of all oral tumors in children. Common site predilection for the lesion is the tongue and soft palate, and may occur on any other surface of the oral cavity such as the uvula and vermilion of the lip. Here, we are presenting a case of squamous papilloma on the palate.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus