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Adverse events related to blood transfusion.

Sahu S - Indian J Anaesth (2014)

Bottom Line: The recognition of adverse events under anaesthesia is always challenging.Better and newer blood screening methods have decreased the infectious complications to almost negligible levels.With universal leukoreduction of red blood cells (RBCs), selection of potential donors such as use of male donors only plasma and restriction of RBC storage, most of the non-infectious complications can be avoided.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anaesthesiology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India.

ABSTRACT
The acute blood transfusion reactions are responsible for causing most serious adverse events. Awareness about various clinical features of acute and delayed transfusion reactions with an ability to assess the serious reactions on time can lead to a better prognosis. Evidence-based medicine has changed today's scenario of clinical practice to decrease adverse transfusion reactions. New evidence-based algorithms of transfusion and improved haemovigilance lead to avoidance of unnecessary transfusions perioperatively. The recognition of adverse events under anaesthesia is always challenging. The unnecessary blood transfusions can be avoided with better blood conservation techniques during surgery and with anaesthesia techniques that reduce blood loss. Better and newer blood screening methods have decreased the infectious complications to almost negligible levels. With universal leukoreduction of red blood cells (RBCs), selection of potential donors such as use of male donors only plasma and restriction of RBC storage, most of the non-infectious complications can be avoided.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Differential diagnosis of adverse transfusion reactions based on clinical presentation (s/s, signs and symptoms). It is common to find overlapping symptoms in most patients. *Severe Hypotension can progress into shock
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Figure 1: Differential diagnosis of adverse transfusion reactions based on clinical presentation (s/s, signs and symptoms). It is common to find overlapping symptoms in most patients. *Severe Hypotension can progress into shock

Mentions: An adverse reaction or event is an undesirable response or effect in a patient, temporally associated with the administration of blood or blood component.[1] Now-a-days, even in developed countries, the greatest risk to the patient lies in non-infectious complications of transfusions that account for significant morbidity and mortality.[2] In this review, the non-infectious adverse events related to blood transfusions aere defined as non-infectious adverse transfusion reactions (NIATRs). The American Association of Blood Banks technical manual provides guidance for the recognition, diagnosis, investigation and classification of non-infectious transfusion reactions, which can serve as a ready reference for clinicians and other health care providers dealing with blood transfusion.[3] The acute and delayed NIATRs are classified on time of occurrence and further divided by presumed aetiology into immune-mediated and non-immune mediated subtypes. An overview of various common NIATRs comprising the classification, pathophysiology, clinical presentations, and management is presented in Table 1. As an aid to help the clinicians in a suspected NIATR, an approach to differential diagnosis is being provided in Figure 1. The broadly accepted classification of the adverse reactions as follows:


Adverse events related to blood transfusion.

Sahu S - Indian J Anaesth (2014)

Differential diagnosis of adverse transfusion reactions based on clinical presentation (s/s, signs and symptoms). It is common to find overlapping symptoms in most patients. *Severe Hypotension can progress into shock
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4260299&req=5

Figure 1: Differential diagnosis of adverse transfusion reactions based on clinical presentation (s/s, signs and symptoms). It is common to find overlapping symptoms in most patients. *Severe Hypotension can progress into shock
Mentions: An adverse reaction or event is an undesirable response or effect in a patient, temporally associated with the administration of blood or blood component.[1] Now-a-days, even in developed countries, the greatest risk to the patient lies in non-infectious complications of transfusions that account for significant morbidity and mortality.[2] In this review, the non-infectious adverse events related to blood transfusions aere defined as non-infectious adverse transfusion reactions (NIATRs). The American Association of Blood Banks technical manual provides guidance for the recognition, diagnosis, investigation and classification of non-infectious transfusion reactions, which can serve as a ready reference for clinicians and other health care providers dealing with blood transfusion.[3] The acute and delayed NIATRs are classified on time of occurrence and further divided by presumed aetiology into immune-mediated and non-immune mediated subtypes. An overview of various common NIATRs comprising the classification, pathophysiology, clinical presentations, and management is presented in Table 1. As an aid to help the clinicians in a suspected NIATR, an approach to differential diagnosis is being provided in Figure 1. The broadly accepted classification of the adverse reactions as follows:

Bottom Line: The recognition of adverse events under anaesthesia is always challenging.Better and newer blood screening methods have decreased the infectious complications to almost negligible levels.With universal leukoreduction of red blood cells (RBCs), selection of potential donors such as use of male donors only plasma and restriction of RBC storage, most of the non-infectious complications can be avoided.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anaesthesiology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India.

ABSTRACT
The acute blood transfusion reactions are responsible for causing most serious adverse events. Awareness about various clinical features of acute and delayed transfusion reactions with an ability to assess the serious reactions on time can lead to a better prognosis. Evidence-based medicine has changed today's scenario of clinical practice to decrease adverse transfusion reactions. New evidence-based algorithms of transfusion and improved haemovigilance lead to avoidance of unnecessary transfusions perioperatively. The recognition of adverse events under anaesthesia is always challenging. The unnecessary blood transfusions can be avoided with better blood conservation techniques during surgery and with anaesthesia techniques that reduce blood loss. Better and newer blood screening methods have decreased the infectious complications to almost negligible levels. With universal leukoreduction of red blood cells (RBCs), selection of potential donors such as use of male donors only plasma and restriction of RBC storage, most of the non-infectious complications can be avoided.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus