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Some side effects and effcts on physical activity of second-generation antipsychotics: A study in children and adolescents.

Arman S, Sadeghye T, Bidaki R - Adv Biomed Res (2014)

Bottom Line: There was no significant correlation between metabolic and non-metabolic AE (P > 0.05).The present study showed the AE of SGA on FBG and TG, but no effect on BP and WC.We also found that children are more prone to develop abnormally high FBG.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study was designed to investigate the metabolic adverse effects (AEs) of second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) and their relationship with physical activity and non-metabolic AE in children and adolescents.

Materials and methods: After exclusion of patients with metabolic syndrome, 62 patients (34 children, 28 adolescents) of both genders who were candidates for SGA therapy were selected. Metabolic parameters included fasting blood glucose (FBG), triglyceride (TG), blood pressure (BP), and waist circumference (WC); non-metabolic AEs and physical activity were evaluated at baseline, 1 month, and 3 months after starting the treatment.

Results: Mean of post-treatment FBG and TG were significantly higher than the baseline values (P < 0.0001). Compared to the baseline value, significantly more patients developed abnormally high (AbH) FBG at the end point (P = 0.02). There was no significant difference in the frequency of patients with AbH-FBG either at the baseline or at the end point (P > 0.05). The frequency of patients with AbH-TG at the end point was not significantly higher than those with baseline AbH-TG (P = 0.10). Although no patient was obese at baseline, 11 (18%) patients developed abdominal obesity at the end point (P < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in the frequency of non-metabolic AE (P > 0.05). There was no significant correlation between metabolic and non-metabolic AE (P > 0.05). Frequency of inactive patients was significantly more than the baseline value (P-0.008), and abdominal obesity was significantly more prevalent in less active participants (P = 0.03).

Conclusion: The present study showed the AE of SGA on FBG and TG, but no effect on BP and WC. We also found that children are more prone to develop abnormally high FBG.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

FBG changes during the study. Mean FBG changes during the study. (FBG-0, fasting blood glucose at baseline; FBG-1, fasting blood glucose 1 month after the treatment; FBG-3, fasting blood glucose 3 months after the treatment)
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Figure 1: FBG changes during the study. Mean FBG changes during the study. (FBG-0, fasting blood glucose at baseline; FBG-1, fasting blood glucose 1 month after the treatment; FBG-3, fasting blood glucose 3 months after the treatment)

Mentions: However, intragroup comparison revealed that compared with 10 (29%) children who had high FBG-0, significantly more (19 (55%)) children had high FBG-3 (P: 0.02). Although the number of adolescents with high FBG-3 was higher than the number of adolescents with high FBG-0, the difference was not statistically significant [16 (57%) vs. 13 (46%), P: 0.29]. FBG changes during the study are given in Figure 1.


Some side effects and effcts on physical activity of second-generation antipsychotics: A study in children and adolescents.

Arman S, Sadeghye T, Bidaki R - Adv Biomed Res (2014)

FBG changes during the study. Mean FBG changes during the study. (FBG-0, fasting blood glucose at baseline; FBG-1, fasting blood glucose 1 month after the treatment; FBG-3, fasting blood glucose 3 months after the treatment)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4260272&req=5

Figure 1: FBG changes during the study. Mean FBG changes during the study. (FBG-0, fasting blood glucose at baseline; FBG-1, fasting blood glucose 1 month after the treatment; FBG-3, fasting blood glucose 3 months after the treatment)
Mentions: However, intragroup comparison revealed that compared with 10 (29%) children who had high FBG-0, significantly more (19 (55%)) children had high FBG-3 (P: 0.02). Although the number of adolescents with high FBG-3 was higher than the number of adolescents with high FBG-0, the difference was not statistically significant [16 (57%) vs. 13 (46%), P: 0.29]. FBG changes during the study are given in Figure 1.

Bottom Line: There was no significant correlation between metabolic and non-metabolic AE (P > 0.05).The present study showed the AE of SGA on FBG and TG, but no effect on BP and WC.We also found that children are more prone to develop abnormally high FBG.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study was designed to investigate the metabolic adverse effects (AEs) of second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) and their relationship with physical activity and non-metabolic AE in children and adolescents.

Materials and methods: After exclusion of patients with metabolic syndrome, 62 patients (34 children, 28 adolescents) of both genders who were candidates for SGA therapy were selected. Metabolic parameters included fasting blood glucose (FBG), triglyceride (TG), blood pressure (BP), and waist circumference (WC); non-metabolic AEs and physical activity were evaluated at baseline, 1 month, and 3 months after starting the treatment.

Results: Mean of post-treatment FBG and TG were significantly higher than the baseline values (P < 0.0001). Compared to the baseline value, significantly more patients developed abnormally high (AbH) FBG at the end point (P = 0.02). There was no significant difference in the frequency of patients with AbH-FBG either at the baseline or at the end point (P > 0.05). The frequency of patients with AbH-TG at the end point was not significantly higher than those with baseline AbH-TG (P = 0.10). Although no patient was obese at baseline, 11 (18%) patients developed abdominal obesity at the end point (P < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in the frequency of non-metabolic AE (P > 0.05). There was no significant correlation between metabolic and non-metabolic AE (P > 0.05). Frequency of inactive patients was significantly more than the baseline value (P-0.008), and abdominal obesity was significantly more prevalent in less active participants (P = 0.03).

Conclusion: The present study showed the AE of SGA on FBG and TG, but no effect on BP and WC. We also found that children are more prone to develop abnormally high FBG.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus