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Effect of ketamine as an adjuvant in ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block: A double-blind randomized clinical trial study.

Lashgarinia M, Naghibi K, Honarmand A, Safavi M, Khazaei M - Adv Biomed Res (2014)

Bottom Line: Ketamine has been reported to enhance the analgesic effects of local anesthetics.The data was analyzed using the χ(2) test, student's t-test, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, and Multivariate analysis tests.Patients in the control group had a higher VAS than patients who received ketamine, at all time points during the first 24 hours after surgery (all P < 0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Anesthesia, Anesthesiology and Critical Care Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: Supraclavicular brachial plexus block is one of the most effective anesthetic procedures in operations for the upper extremity. Ketamine has been reported to enhance the analgesic effects of local anesthetics. We have conducted this study to assess whether coadministration of ketamine can prolong the local analgesic effect of lidocaine in the supraclavicular brachial plexus block for patients undergoing elective upper extremity surgery.

Materials and methods: Sixty adult patients undergoing elective surgery of the elbow, forearm, wrist or hand were randomly allocated in two groups of 30 patients each. Group 1 (ketamine group) received 5 mg/kg lidocaine 1.5% plus 2 mg/kg ketamine, Group 2 (control group) received 5 mg/kg lidocaine 1.5% and saline. The outcome measures included severity of pain by using visual analog scale (VAS, 0 = no pain 10 cm = the most severe pain), time of first request for analgesia, and total dose of postoperative opioid administration. The data was analyzed using the χ(2) test, student's t-test, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, and Multivariate analysis tests.

Results: Patients in the control group had a higher VAS than patients who received ketamine, at all time points during the first 24 hours after surgery (all P < 0.05). The time of first request for analgesia in the ketamine group was significantly more than in the control group (8.93 ± 1.0 vs. 7.30 ± 1.9, respectively, P < 0.001).

Conclusion: The addition of ketamine to lidocaine in the ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block could decrease the postoperative pain and need for analgesic. Therefore, it could be considered as an option in the brachial plexus block to enhance the analgesic action of lidocaine.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Kaplan-Meier survival curve describing the rescue time for the first dose of pethidine administration in the two groups
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Figure 2: Kaplan-Meier survival curve describing the rescue time for the first dose of pethidine administration in the two groups

Mentions: Time of administration of the first dose of pethidine was significantly more in the ketamine group, but the total pethidine dose was less [Table 3, Figures 2 and 3]. Comparison of VAS between groups at various times, postoperatively, has been presented in Table 4. The most significant and highest VAS pain scores were found in the control group at all time points (P < 0.05).


Effect of ketamine as an adjuvant in ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block: A double-blind randomized clinical trial study.

Lashgarinia M, Naghibi K, Honarmand A, Safavi M, Khazaei M - Adv Biomed Res (2014)

Kaplan-Meier survival curve describing the rescue time for the first dose of pethidine administration in the two groups
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4260270&req=5

Figure 2: Kaplan-Meier survival curve describing the rescue time for the first dose of pethidine administration in the two groups
Mentions: Time of administration of the first dose of pethidine was significantly more in the ketamine group, but the total pethidine dose was less [Table 3, Figures 2 and 3]. Comparison of VAS between groups at various times, postoperatively, has been presented in Table 4. The most significant and highest VAS pain scores were found in the control group at all time points (P < 0.05).

Bottom Line: Ketamine has been reported to enhance the analgesic effects of local anesthetics.The data was analyzed using the χ(2) test, student's t-test, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, and Multivariate analysis tests.Patients in the control group had a higher VAS than patients who received ketamine, at all time points during the first 24 hours after surgery (all P < 0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Anesthesia, Anesthesiology and Critical Care Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: Supraclavicular brachial plexus block is one of the most effective anesthetic procedures in operations for the upper extremity. Ketamine has been reported to enhance the analgesic effects of local anesthetics. We have conducted this study to assess whether coadministration of ketamine can prolong the local analgesic effect of lidocaine in the supraclavicular brachial plexus block for patients undergoing elective upper extremity surgery.

Materials and methods: Sixty adult patients undergoing elective surgery of the elbow, forearm, wrist or hand were randomly allocated in two groups of 30 patients each. Group 1 (ketamine group) received 5 mg/kg lidocaine 1.5% plus 2 mg/kg ketamine, Group 2 (control group) received 5 mg/kg lidocaine 1.5% and saline. The outcome measures included severity of pain by using visual analog scale (VAS, 0 = no pain 10 cm = the most severe pain), time of first request for analgesia, and total dose of postoperative opioid administration. The data was analyzed using the χ(2) test, student's t-test, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, and Multivariate analysis tests.

Results: Patients in the control group had a higher VAS than patients who received ketamine, at all time points during the first 24 hours after surgery (all P < 0.05). The time of first request for analgesia in the ketamine group was significantly more than in the control group (8.93 ± 1.0 vs. 7.30 ± 1.9, respectively, P < 0.001).

Conclusion: The addition of ketamine to lidocaine in the ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block could decrease the postoperative pain and need for analgesic. Therefore, it could be considered as an option in the brachial plexus block to enhance the analgesic action of lidocaine.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus