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High channel count and high precision channel spacing multi-wavelength laser array for future PICs.

Shi Y, Li S, Chen X, Li L, Li J, Zhang T, Zheng J, Zhang Y, Tang S, Hou L, Marsh JH, Qiu B - Sci Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: In spite of their tremendous potential, adoption of the MLA has been hampered by a number of issues, particularly wavelength precision and fabrication cost.In this paper, we report high channel count MLAs in which the wavelengths of each channel can be determined precisely through low-cost standard μm-level photolithography/holographic lithography and the reconstruction-equivalent-chirp (REC) technique. 60-wavelength MLAs with good wavelength spacing uniformity have been demonstrated experimentally, in which nearly 83% lasers are within a wavelength deviation of ±0.20 nm, corresponding to a tolerance of ±0.032 nm in the period pitch.As a result of employing the equivalent phase shift technique, the single longitudinal mode (SLM) yield is nearly 100%, while the theoretical yield of standard DFB lasers is only around 33.3%.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Microwave-Photonics Technology Laboratory, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093, China.

ABSTRACT
Multi-wavelength semiconductor laser arrays (MLAs) have wide applications in wavelength multiplexing division (WDM) networks. In spite of their tremendous potential, adoption of the MLA has been hampered by a number of issues, particularly wavelength precision and fabrication cost. In this paper, we report high channel count MLAs in which the wavelengths of each channel can be determined precisely through low-cost standard μm-level photolithography/holographic lithography and the reconstruction-equivalent-chirp (REC) technique. 60-wavelength MLAs with good wavelength spacing uniformity have been demonstrated experimentally, in which nearly 83% lasers are within a wavelength deviation of ±0.20 nm, corresponding to a tolerance of ±0.032 nm in the period pitch. As a result of employing the equivalent phase shift technique, the single longitudinal mode (SLM) yield is nearly 100%, while the theoretical yield of standard DFB lasers is only around 33.3%.

No MeSH data available.


(a) The measured lasing spectra of one 60-wavelength array which is corresponding to Array No.5 in Fig. 3. One laser is dual mode. (b) The lasing wavelengths and the linear fitting curve with the slope of 0.7887 nm/channel (the deigned value is 0.80 nm/channel). (c) The wavelength residuals after linear fitting which is also plotted in Fig. 3 Array No.5 for detailed statistical data.
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f6: (a) The measured lasing spectra of one 60-wavelength array which is corresponding to Array No.5 in Fig. 3. One laser is dual mode. (b) The lasing wavelengths and the linear fitting curve with the slope of 0.7887 nm/channel (the deigned value is 0.80 nm/channel). (c) The wavelength residuals after linear fitting which is also plotted in Fig. 3 Array No.5 for detailed statistical data.

Mentions: The detailed lasing spectrum of one array (Array No.5 in Fig. 3) was randomly selected. Its wavelength spacing is 0.8 nm, as shown in Fig. 6(a). One laser out of the 60 elements shows dual mode, so the SLM ratio of the array is as high as 98.3%. Fig. 6(b) shows the lasing wavelengths as well as the linear fitting curve. In order to further analyze the deviation of the measured data from the fitted curve, the wavelength residual values of 59 lasers (the laser with dual mode was ignored) after fitting is given in Fig. 6(c), which shows that 88% of the laser wavelengths lie within a deviation of ±0.20 nm [Fig. 3 Array No.5 shows detailed information]. The threshold currents are between 25 mA and 35 mA. The high threshold mainly results from the long cavity length (600 µm), and could be reduced by optimizing parameters such as the cavity length, coupling coefficient of the grating, by using a buried-heterostructure waveguide15.


High channel count and high precision channel spacing multi-wavelength laser array for future PICs.

Shi Y, Li S, Chen X, Li L, Li J, Zhang T, Zheng J, Zhang Y, Tang S, Hou L, Marsh JH, Qiu B - Sci Rep (2014)

(a) The measured lasing spectra of one 60-wavelength array which is corresponding to Array No.5 in Fig. 3. One laser is dual mode. (b) The lasing wavelengths and the linear fitting curve with the slope of 0.7887 nm/channel (the deigned value is 0.80 nm/channel). (c) The wavelength residuals after linear fitting which is also plotted in Fig. 3 Array No.5 for detailed statistical data.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4260219&req=5

f6: (a) The measured lasing spectra of one 60-wavelength array which is corresponding to Array No.5 in Fig. 3. One laser is dual mode. (b) The lasing wavelengths and the linear fitting curve with the slope of 0.7887 nm/channel (the deigned value is 0.80 nm/channel). (c) The wavelength residuals after linear fitting which is also plotted in Fig. 3 Array No.5 for detailed statistical data.
Mentions: The detailed lasing spectrum of one array (Array No.5 in Fig. 3) was randomly selected. Its wavelength spacing is 0.8 nm, as shown in Fig. 6(a). One laser out of the 60 elements shows dual mode, so the SLM ratio of the array is as high as 98.3%. Fig. 6(b) shows the lasing wavelengths as well as the linear fitting curve. In order to further analyze the deviation of the measured data from the fitted curve, the wavelength residual values of 59 lasers (the laser with dual mode was ignored) after fitting is given in Fig. 6(c), which shows that 88% of the laser wavelengths lie within a deviation of ±0.20 nm [Fig. 3 Array No.5 shows detailed information]. The threshold currents are between 25 mA and 35 mA. The high threshold mainly results from the long cavity length (600 µm), and could be reduced by optimizing parameters such as the cavity length, coupling coefficient of the grating, by using a buried-heterostructure waveguide15.

Bottom Line: In spite of their tremendous potential, adoption of the MLA has been hampered by a number of issues, particularly wavelength precision and fabrication cost.In this paper, we report high channel count MLAs in which the wavelengths of each channel can be determined precisely through low-cost standard μm-level photolithography/holographic lithography and the reconstruction-equivalent-chirp (REC) technique. 60-wavelength MLAs with good wavelength spacing uniformity have been demonstrated experimentally, in which nearly 83% lasers are within a wavelength deviation of ±0.20 nm, corresponding to a tolerance of ±0.032 nm in the period pitch.As a result of employing the equivalent phase shift technique, the single longitudinal mode (SLM) yield is nearly 100%, while the theoretical yield of standard DFB lasers is only around 33.3%.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Microwave-Photonics Technology Laboratory, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093, China.

ABSTRACT
Multi-wavelength semiconductor laser arrays (MLAs) have wide applications in wavelength multiplexing division (WDM) networks. In spite of their tremendous potential, adoption of the MLA has been hampered by a number of issues, particularly wavelength precision and fabrication cost. In this paper, we report high channel count MLAs in which the wavelengths of each channel can be determined precisely through low-cost standard μm-level photolithography/holographic lithography and the reconstruction-equivalent-chirp (REC) technique. 60-wavelength MLAs with good wavelength spacing uniformity have been demonstrated experimentally, in which nearly 83% lasers are within a wavelength deviation of ±0.20 nm, corresponding to a tolerance of ±0.032 nm in the period pitch. As a result of employing the equivalent phase shift technique, the single longitudinal mode (SLM) yield is nearly 100%, while the theoretical yield of standard DFB lasers is only around 33.3%.

No MeSH data available.