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High channel count and high precision channel spacing multi-wavelength laser array for future PICs.

Shi Y, Li S, Chen X, Li L, Li J, Zhang T, Zheng J, Zhang Y, Tang S, Hou L, Marsh JH, Qiu B - Sci Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: In spite of their tremendous potential, adoption of the MLA has been hampered by a number of issues, particularly wavelength precision and fabrication cost.In this paper, we report high channel count MLAs in which the wavelengths of each channel can be determined precisely through low-cost standard μm-level photolithography/holographic lithography and the reconstruction-equivalent-chirp (REC) technique. 60-wavelength MLAs with good wavelength spacing uniformity have been demonstrated experimentally, in which nearly 83% lasers are within a wavelength deviation of ±0.20 nm, corresponding to a tolerance of ±0.032 nm in the period pitch.As a result of employing the equivalent phase shift technique, the single longitudinal mode (SLM) yield is nearly 100%, while the theoretical yield of standard DFB lasers is only around 33.3%.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Microwave-Photonics Technology Laboratory, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093, China.

ABSTRACT
Multi-wavelength semiconductor laser arrays (MLAs) have wide applications in wavelength multiplexing division (WDM) networks. In spite of their tremendous potential, adoption of the MLA has been hampered by a number of issues, particularly wavelength precision and fabrication cost. In this paper, we report high channel count MLAs in which the wavelengths of each channel can be determined precisely through low-cost standard μm-level photolithography/holographic lithography and the reconstruction-equivalent-chirp (REC) technique. 60-wavelength MLAs with good wavelength spacing uniformity have been demonstrated experimentally, in which nearly 83% lasers are within a wavelength deviation of ±0.20 nm, corresponding to a tolerance of ±0.032 nm in the period pitch. As a result of employing the equivalent phase shift technique, the single longitudinal mode (SLM) yield is nearly 100%, while the theoretical yield of standard DFB lasers is only around 33.3%.

No MeSH data available.


The statistical characteristics of the measured 7 arrays.The ratios of the wavelength residuals within ±0.20 nm are 81.4%, 71.7%, 90.0%, 85.0% 88.1% 82.1% and 85.0% respectively and the mean value is 83.3%. The single-longitudinal-mode yield of the arrays are 98.3%, 100%, 100%, 100%, 98.3%, 93.3% and 100% respectively.
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f3: The statistical characteristics of the measured 7 arrays.The ratios of the wavelength residuals within ±0.20 nm are 81.4%, 71.7%, 90.0%, 85.0% 88.1% 82.1% and 85.0% respectively and the mean value is 83.3%. The single-longitudinal-mode yield of the arrays are 98.3%, 100%, 100%, 100%, 98.3%, 93.3% and 100% respectively.

Mentions: The relative wavelength accuracy was determined as follows. The measured wavelengths of the lasers in arrays were measured and linearly fitted. The wavelength residual, which indicates wavelength deviations (δ) from the fitted line, could then be obtained. The slope of the fitted line denotes the wavelength spacing of the fabricated MLA. The detailed wavelength residual frequency counts of the seven measured arrays are shown in Fig. 3. For all the laser arrays, the mean lasing wavelength residuals of 83.3% of the lasers are within ±0.20 nm, and 93.5% are within ±0.30 nm. Lasers with a wavelength deviation of >0.50 nm are less than 1.0% of the total laser count. The single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) yield of lasers from the seven arrays are 98.3%, 100%, 100%, 100%, 98.3%, 93.3% and 100% respectively, with the average SLM yield being 98.6%.


High channel count and high precision channel spacing multi-wavelength laser array for future PICs.

Shi Y, Li S, Chen X, Li L, Li J, Zhang T, Zheng J, Zhang Y, Tang S, Hou L, Marsh JH, Qiu B - Sci Rep (2014)

The statistical characteristics of the measured 7 arrays.The ratios of the wavelength residuals within ±0.20 nm are 81.4%, 71.7%, 90.0%, 85.0% 88.1% 82.1% and 85.0% respectively and the mean value is 83.3%. The single-longitudinal-mode yield of the arrays are 98.3%, 100%, 100%, 100%, 98.3%, 93.3% and 100% respectively.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4260219&req=5

f3: The statistical characteristics of the measured 7 arrays.The ratios of the wavelength residuals within ±0.20 nm are 81.4%, 71.7%, 90.0%, 85.0% 88.1% 82.1% and 85.0% respectively and the mean value is 83.3%. The single-longitudinal-mode yield of the arrays are 98.3%, 100%, 100%, 100%, 98.3%, 93.3% and 100% respectively.
Mentions: The relative wavelength accuracy was determined as follows. The measured wavelengths of the lasers in arrays were measured and linearly fitted. The wavelength residual, which indicates wavelength deviations (δ) from the fitted line, could then be obtained. The slope of the fitted line denotes the wavelength spacing of the fabricated MLA. The detailed wavelength residual frequency counts of the seven measured arrays are shown in Fig. 3. For all the laser arrays, the mean lasing wavelength residuals of 83.3% of the lasers are within ±0.20 nm, and 93.5% are within ±0.30 nm. Lasers with a wavelength deviation of >0.50 nm are less than 1.0% of the total laser count. The single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) yield of lasers from the seven arrays are 98.3%, 100%, 100%, 100%, 98.3%, 93.3% and 100% respectively, with the average SLM yield being 98.6%.

Bottom Line: In spite of their tremendous potential, adoption of the MLA has been hampered by a number of issues, particularly wavelength precision and fabrication cost.In this paper, we report high channel count MLAs in which the wavelengths of each channel can be determined precisely through low-cost standard μm-level photolithography/holographic lithography and the reconstruction-equivalent-chirp (REC) technique. 60-wavelength MLAs with good wavelength spacing uniformity have been demonstrated experimentally, in which nearly 83% lasers are within a wavelength deviation of ±0.20 nm, corresponding to a tolerance of ±0.032 nm in the period pitch.As a result of employing the equivalent phase shift technique, the single longitudinal mode (SLM) yield is nearly 100%, while the theoretical yield of standard DFB lasers is only around 33.3%.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Microwave-Photonics Technology Laboratory, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093, China.

ABSTRACT
Multi-wavelength semiconductor laser arrays (MLAs) have wide applications in wavelength multiplexing division (WDM) networks. In spite of their tremendous potential, adoption of the MLA has been hampered by a number of issues, particularly wavelength precision and fabrication cost. In this paper, we report high channel count MLAs in which the wavelengths of each channel can be determined precisely through low-cost standard μm-level photolithography/holographic lithography and the reconstruction-equivalent-chirp (REC) technique. 60-wavelength MLAs with good wavelength spacing uniformity have been demonstrated experimentally, in which nearly 83% lasers are within a wavelength deviation of ±0.20 nm, corresponding to a tolerance of ±0.032 nm in the period pitch. As a result of employing the equivalent phase shift technique, the single longitudinal mode (SLM) yield is nearly 100%, while the theoretical yield of standard DFB lasers is only around 33.3%.

No MeSH data available.