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High channel count and high precision channel spacing multi-wavelength laser array for future PICs.

Shi Y, Li S, Chen X, Li L, Li J, Zhang T, Zheng J, Zhang Y, Tang S, Hou L, Marsh JH, Qiu B - Sci Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: In spite of their tremendous potential, adoption of the MLA has been hampered by a number of issues, particularly wavelength precision and fabrication cost.In this paper, we report high channel count MLAs in which the wavelengths of each channel can be determined precisely through low-cost standard μm-level photolithography/holographic lithography and the reconstruction-equivalent-chirp (REC) technique. 60-wavelength MLAs with good wavelength spacing uniformity have been demonstrated experimentally, in which nearly 83% lasers are within a wavelength deviation of ±0.20 nm, corresponding to a tolerance of ±0.032 nm in the period pitch.As a result of employing the equivalent phase shift technique, the single longitudinal mode (SLM) yield is nearly 100%, while the theoretical yield of standard DFB lasers is only around 33.3%.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Microwave-Photonics Technology Laboratory, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093, China.

ABSTRACT
Multi-wavelength semiconductor laser arrays (MLAs) have wide applications in wavelength multiplexing division (WDM) networks. In spite of their tremendous potential, adoption of the MLA has been hampered by a number of issues, particularly wavelength precision and fabrication cost. In this paper, we report high channel count MLAs in which the wavelengths of each channel can be determined precisely through low-cost standard μm-level photolithography/holographic lithography and the reconstruction-equivalent-chirp (REC) technique. 60-wavelength MLAs with good wavelength spacing uniformity have been demonstrated experimentally, in which nearly 83% lasers are within a wavelength deviation of ±0.20 nm, corresponding to a tolerance of ±0.032 nm in the period pitch. As a result of employing the equivalent phase shift technique, the single longitudinal mode (SLM) yield is nearly 100%, while the theoretical yield of standard DFB lasers is only around 33.3%.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic of the DFB laser array with π-EPS.The seed grating is uniform with pre-designed sampling pattern with µm-scale for equivalently realizing the nano-fine grating structures. The wavelength can be tailored by sampling period and the single-longitudinal-mode can be guaranteed by π-EPS.
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f2: Schematic of the DFB laser array with π-EPS.The seed grating is uniform with pre-designed sampling pattern with µm-scale for equivalently realizing the nano-fine grating structures. The wavelength can be tailored by sampling period and the single-longitudinal-mode can be guaranteed by π-EPS.

Mentions: 60-wavelength DFB laser arrays with a π-equivalent phase shift (π-EPS) were designed and fabricated. The Bragg wavelength of the 0th order sub-grating is about 1640 nm (seed grating period is about 258.7 nm), a wavelength where the gain is small enough to avoid unwanted lasing. The designed wavelength spacing of the arrays is 0.2 nm, 0.4 nm and 0.8 nm, respectively. The sampling periods for 0.8 nm wavelength spacing are from about 2.82 µm to 4.58 µm. The cavity length is 600 μm and the lateral pitch of lasers is 125 μm. A 2 µm ridge waveguide is used to guide light and <1.0% Anti-reflection facet coatings (AR/AR) are applied to avoid the influence of random phase reflections from the facets. The normalized coupling coefficient of the ±1st sub-grating is around 2.5. Fig. 2 shows a schematic illustration of the DFB laser array with π-EPS.


High channel count and high precision channel spacing multi-wavelength laser array for future PICs.

Shi Y, Li S, Chen X, Li L, Li J, Zhang T, Zheng J, Zhang Y, Tang S, Hou L, Marsh JH, Qiu B - Sci Rep (2014)

Schematic of the DFB laser array with π-EPS.The seed grating is uniform with pre-designed sampling pattern with µm-scale for equivalently realizing the nano-fine grating structures. The wavelength can be tailored by sampling period and the single-longitudinal-mode can be guaranteed by π-EPS.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4260219&req=5

f2: Schematic of the DFB laser array with π-EPS.The seed grating is uniform with pre-designed sampling pattern with µm-scale for equivalently realizing the nano-fine grating structures. The wavelength can be tailored by sampling period and the single-longitudinal-mode can be guaranteed by π-EPS.
Mentions: 60-wavelength DFB laser arrays with a π-equivalent phase shift (π-EPS) were designed and fabricated. The Bragg wavelength of the 0th order sub-grating is about 1640 nm (seed grating period is about 258.7 nm), a wavelength where the gain is small enough to avoid unwanted lasing. The designed wavelength spacing of the arrays is 0.2 nm, 0.4 nm and 0.8 nm, respectively. The sampling periods for 0.8 nm wavelength spacing are from about 2.82 µm to 4.58 µm. The cavity length is 600 μm and the lateral pitch of lasers is 125 μm. A 2 µm ridge waveguide is used to guide light and <1.0% Anti-reflection facet coatings (AR/AR) are applied to avoid the influence of random phase reflections from the facets. The normalized coupling coefficient of the ±1st sub-grating is around 2.5. Fig. 2 shows a schematic illustration of the DFB laser array with π-EPS.

Bottom Line: In spite of their tremendous potential, adoption of the MLA has been hampered by a number of issues, particularly wavelength precision and fabrication cost.In this paper, we report high channel count MLAs in which the wavelengths of each channel can be determined precisely through low-cost standard μm-level photolithography/holographic lithography and the reconstruction-equivalent-chirp (REC) technique. 60-wavelength MLAs with good wavelength spacing uniformity have been demonstrated experimentally, in which nearly 83% lasers are within a wavelength deviation of ±0.20 nm, corresponding to a tolerance of ±0.032 nm in the period pitch.As a result of employing the equivalent phase shift technique, the single longitudinal mode (SLM) yield is nearly 100%, while the theoretical yield of standard DFB lasers is only around 33.3%.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Microwave-Photonics Technology Laboratory, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093, China.

ABSTRACT
Multi-wavelength semiconductor laser arrays (MLAs) have wide applications in wavelength multiplexing division (WDM) networks. In spite of their tremendous potential, adoption of the MLA has been hampered by a number of issues, particularly wavelength precision and fabrication cost. In this paper, we report high channel count MLAs in which the wavelengths of each channel can be determined precisely through low-cost standard μm-level photolithography/holographic lithography and the reconstruction-equivalent-chirp (REC) technique. 60-wavelength MLAs with good wavelength spacing uniformity have been demonstrated experimentally, in which nearly 83% lasers are within a wavelength deviation of ±0.20 nm, corresponding to a tolerance of ±0.032 nm in the period pitch. As a result of employing the equivalent phase shift technique, the single longitudinal mode (SLM) yield is nearly 100%, while the theoretical yield of standard DFB lasers is only around 33.3%.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus