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Partial genetic characterization of peste des petits ruminants virus from goats in northern and eastern Tanzania.

Kgotlele T, Macha ES, Kasanga CJ, Kusiluka LJ, Karimuribo ED, Van Doorsselaere J, Wensman JJ, Munir M, Misinzo G - Transbound Emerg Dis (2014)

Bottom Line: Post mortem findings included pneumonia, congestion of the intestines, and hemorrhages in lymph nodes associated with the respiratory and gastrointestinal systems.Phylogenetic analysis, based on the N gene, indicated that PPRV obtained from Northern and Eastern Tanzania clustered with PPRV strains of Lineage III, together with PPRV from Sudan and Ethiopia.The findings of this study indicate that there are active PPRV infections in Northern and Eastern Tanzania, suggesting risks for potential spread of PPR in the rest of Tanzania.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro, Tanzania.

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Phylogenetic relationship of peste des petits ruminants viruses (PPRV). A neighbour-joining phylogenetic tree depicting the relationship of Tanzanian PPRV obtained from this study (indicated with circles) with other PPRV belonging to Lineages I-IV. Tanzanian PPRV from Northern Tanzania (Ngorongoro) and Eastern Tanzania (Dakawa) are not 100% identical and are clustered within Lineages III. Phylogeny was inferred following 1000 bootstrap replications and values <50% were not shown.
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fig03: Phylogenetic relationship of peste des petits ruminants viruses (PPRV). A neighbour-joining phylogenetic tree depicting the relationship of Tanzanian PPRV obtained from this study (indicated with circles) with other PPRV belonging to Lineages I-IV. Tanzanian PPRV from Northern Tanzania (Ngorongoro) and Eastern Tanzania (Dakawa) are not 100% identical and are clustered within Lineages III. Phylogeny was inferred following 1000 bootstrap replications and values <50% were not shown.

Mentions: The N gene nucleotide sequences of Tanzanian PPRV obtained from this study were submitted at GenBank and provided with accession numbers KF939643 and KF939644 for Tanzania/Dakawa/2013 and Tanzania/Ngorongoro/2013 strains, respectively. Alignment of the N gene nucleotide sequences of PPRV obtained from Mvomero showed that the sequences were 100% identical. Similarly, the N gene nucleotide sequences of PPRV obtained from positive animals in Ngorongoro were found to be 100% identical. Therefore, single sequence from each area was selected for phylogenetic analysis. However, the 320 nucleotides long N gene sequences of PPRV from Mvomero and Ngorongoro had two nucleotide substitutions. Translation of the sequences showed that one nucleotide substitution was nonsense while the other substitution led to a change of an amino acid at position 60 (G→A). BLASTN analysis of both Dakawa and Ngorongoro N gene nucleotide sequences of PPRV showed 96% identity to PPRV from Sudan and Ethiopia. A phylogenetic tree based on N gene nucleotide sequences was constructed using the PPRV N gene sequences obtained in this study and other viruses representing the four PPRV lineages. The N gene sequences of PPRV from Mvomero and Ngorongoro districts clustered into Lineage III together with other PPRV previously reported from Ethiopia, Sudan, Oman and United Arab Emirates (Fig. 3).


Partial genetic characterization of peste des petits ruminants virus from goats in northern and eastern Tanzania.

Kgotlele T, Macha ES, Kasanga CJ, Kusiluka LJ, Karimuribo ED, Van Doorsselaere J, Wensman JJ, Munir M, Misinzo G - Transbound Emerg Dis (2014)

Phylogenetic relationship of peste des petits ruminants viruses (PPRV). A neighbour-joining phylogenetic tree depicting the relationship of Tanzanian PPRV obtained from this study (indicated with circles) with other PPRV belonging to Lineages I-IV. Tanzanian PPRV from Northern Tanzania (Ngorongoro) and Eastern Tanzania (Dakawa) are not 100% identical and are clustered within Lineages III. Phylogeny was inferred following 1000 bootstrap replications and values <50% were not shown.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4260210&req=5

fig03: Phylogenetic relationship of peste des petits ruminants viruses (PPRV). A neighbour-joining phylogenetic tree depicting the relationship of Tanzanian PPRV obtained from this study (indicated with circles) with other PPRV belonging to Lineages I-IV. Tanzanian PPRV from Northern Tanzania (Ngorongoro) and Eastern Tanzania (Dakawa) are not 100% identical and are clustered within Lineages III. Phylogeny was inferred following 1000 bootstrap replications and values <50% were not shown.
Mentions: The N gene nucleotide sequences of Tanzanian PPRV obtained from this study were submitted at GenBank and provided with accession numbers KF939643 and KF939644 for Tanzania/Dakawa/2013 and Tanzania/Ngorongoro/2013 strains, respectively. Alignment of the N gene nucleotide sequences of PPRV obtained from Mvomero showed that the sequences were 100% identical. Similarly, the N gene nucleotide sequences of PPRV obtained from positive animals in Ngorongoro were found to be 100% identical. Therefore, single sequence from each area was selected for phylogenetic analysis. However, the 320 nucleotides long N gene sequences of PPRV from Mvomero and Ngorongoro had two nucleotide substitutions. Translation of the sequences showed that one nucleotide substitution was nonsense while the other substitution led to a change of an amino acid at position 60 (G→A). BLASTN analysis of both Dakawa and Ngorongoro N gene nucleotide sequences of PPRV showed 96% identity to PPRV from Sudan and Ethiopia. A phylogenetic tree based on N gene nucleotide sequences was constructed using the PPRV N gene sequences obtained in this study and other viruses representing the four PPRV lineages. The N gene sequences of PPRV from Mvomero and Ngorongoro districts clustered into Lineage III together with other PPRV previously reported from Ethiopia, Sudan, Oman and United Arab Emirates (Fig. 3).

Bottom Line: Post mortem findings included pneumonia, congestion of the intestines, and hemorrhages in lymph nodes associated with the respiratory and gastrointestinal systems.Phylogenetic analysis, based on the N gene, indicated that PPRV obtained from Northern and Eastern Tanzania clustered with PPRV strains of Lineage III, together with PPRV from Sudan and Ethiopia.The findings of this study indicate that there are active PPRV infections in Northern and Eastern Tanzania, suggesting risks for potential spread of PPR in the rest of Tanzania.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro, Tanzania.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus