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Partial genetic characterization of peste des petits ruminants virus from goats in northern and eastern Tanzania.

Kgotlele T, Macha ES, Kasanga CJ, Kusiluka LJ, Karimuribo ED, Van Doorsselaere J, Wensman JJ, Munir M, Misinzo G - Transbound Emerg Dis (2014)

Bottom Line: Post mortem findings included pneumonia, congestion of the intestines, and hemorrhages in lymph nodes associated with the respiratory and gastrointestinal systems.Phylogenetic analysis, based on the N gene, indicated that PPRV obtained from Northern and Eastern Tanzania clustered with PPRV strains of Lineage III, together with PPRV from Sudan and Ethiopia.The findings of this study indicate that there are active PPRV infections in Northern and Eastern Tanzania, suggesting risks for potential spread of PPR in the rest of Tanzania.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro, Tanzania.

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Clinical signs and post mortem findings in goats with peste des petits ruminants (PPR). (a) A goat with oculonasal discharges, periorbital edema and cutaneous nodules. (b) After skinning, cutaneous nodules were mainly confined within the skin with the exception of a few cutaneous nodules that could be observed below the skin (arrow head). Other postmorterm findings in goats with PPR included congestion of intestines (c), pneumonia (d and e) and froth formation (d, arrow head) and hemorrhage of the lymph nodes draining internal organs within thoracic and abdominal cavities (f).
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fig02: Clinical signs and post mortem findings in goats with peste des petits ruminants (PPR). (a) A goat with oculonasal discharges, periorbital edema and cutaneous nodules. (b) After skinning, cutaneous nodules were mainly confined within the skin with the exception of a few cutaneous nodules that could be observed below the skin (arrow head). Other postmorterm findings in goats with PPR included congestion of intestines (c), pneumonia (d and e) and froth formation (d, arrow head) and hemorrhage of the lymph nodes draining internal organs within thoracic and abdominal cavities (f).

Mentions: The main clinical signs observed in goats suspected with PPR included fever, dullness, diarrhea, lacrimation, matting of eye lids, purulent oculonasal discharges, cutaneous nodules, erosions on the soft palate and gums and laboured breathing. In some animals, raised cutaneous nodules of up to 3 cm in size were observed especially on the neck region (Fig. 2). The rectal temperature of the examined goats ranged between 39.1 to 41°C, with most animals examined having temperatures above 40°C. Post mortem findings included pneumonia, dark red and firm to touch areas in the lungs, haemorrhages and congestion of the intestines, watery intestinal contents and hemorrhages of lymph nodes associated with the respiratory and gastrointestinal systems (Fig. 2).


Partial genetic characterization of peste des petits ruminants virus from goats in northern and eastern Tanzania.

Kgotlele T, Macha ES, Kasanga CJ, Kusiluka LJ, Karimuribo ED, Van Doorsselaere J, Wensman JJ, Munir M, Misinzo G - Transbound Emerg Dis (2014)

Clinical signs and post mortem findings in goats with peste des petits ruminants (PPR). (a) A goat with oculonasal discharges, periorbital edema and cutaneous nodules. (b) After skinning, cutaneous nodules were mainly confined within the skin with the exception of a few cutaneous nodules that could be observed below the skin (arrow head). Other postmorterm findings in goats with PPR included congestion of intestines (c), pneumonia (d and e) and froth formation (d, arrow head) and hemorrhage of the lymph nodes draining internal organs within thoracic and abdominal cavities (f).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4260210&req=5

fig02: Clinical signs and post mortem findings in goats with peste des petits ruminants (PPR). (a) A goat with oculonasal discharges, periorbital edema and cutaneous nodules. (b) After skinning, cutaneous nodules were mainly confined within the skin with the exception of a few cutaneous nodules that could be observed below the skin (arrow head). Other postmorterm findings in goats with PPR included congestion of intestines (c), pneumonia (d and e) and froth formation (d, arrow head) and hemorrhage of the lymph nodes draining internal organs within thoracic and abdominal cavities (f).
Mentions: The main clinical signs observed in goats suspected with PPR included fever, dullness, diarrhea, lacrimation, matting of eye lids, purulent oculonasal discharges, cutaneous nodules, erosions on the soft palate and gums and laboured breathing. In some animals, raised cutaneous nodules of up to 3 cm in size were observed especially on the neck region (Fig. 2). The rectal temperature of the examined goats ranged between 39.1 to 41°C, with most animals examined having temperatures above 40°C. Post mortem findings included pneumonia, dark red and firm to touch areas in the lungs, haemorrhages and congestion of the intestines, watery intestinal contents and hemorrhages of lymph nodes associated with the respiratory and gastrointestinal systems (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: Post mortem findings included pneumonia, congestion of the intestines, and hemorrhages in lymph nodes associated with the respiratory and gastrointestinal systems.Phylogenetic analysis, based on the N gene, indicated that PPRV obtained from Northern and Eastern Tanzania clustered with PPRV strains of Lineage III, together with PPRV from Sudan and Ethiopia.The findings of this study indicate that there are active PPRV infections in Northern and Eastern Tanzania, suggesting risks for potential spread of PPR in the rest of Tanzania.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro, Tanzania.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus