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Novel metal allergy patch test using metal nanoballs.

Sugiyama T, Uo M, Wada T, Hongo T, Omagari D, Komiyama K, Sasaki H, Takahashi H, Kusama M, Mori Y - J Nanobiotechnology (2014)

Bottom Line: Consequently, in the new test system, reactions caused by high concentrations of metal salts were avoided.By exploiting the high specific surface area of Ni nanoballs, we obtained an effective dissolution of Ni ions that triggered Ni allergy in the absence of direct contact between the nanoballs and mouse skin.This novel patch system can be applied to other metals and alloys for diagnosing various types of metal-induced contact dermatitis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dentistry, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Jichi Medical University, 3311-1 Yakushiji, Shimotsuke, Tochigi, 329-0498, Japan. tomoko_s@jichi.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT

Background: Patch tests are often used in the clinical diagnosis of metal allergies. In currently available patch tests, high concentrations of metal salt solutions are used. However, diagnosis accuracy can be influenced not only by acute skin reactions to high concentrations of metal salt, but also by skin reactions to other components present in the patch or to pH changes. In this study, we developed Ni nanoparticles (termed "nanoballs") for use in patch-test solutions.

Findings: Highly soluble, spherical Ni nanoballs were prepared using plasma electrolysis. The Ni released from the nanoballs permeated through a dialysis membrane, and the nanoball-containing solution's pH was maintained constant. Ni ions were released slowly at low concentrations in a time-dependent manner, which contrasted the rapid release observed in the case of a commercial patch test. Consequently, in the new test system, reactions caused by high concentrations of metal salts were avoided.

Conclusions: By exploiting the high specific surface area of Ni nanoballs, we obtained an effective dissolution of Ni ions that triggered Ni allergy in the absence of direct contact between the nanoballs and mouse skin. This novel patch system can be applied to other metals and alloys for diagnosing various types of metal-induced contact dermatitis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

In vitroNi release from Ni-nanoball suspensions through a dialysis membrane. Experimental setup (a) and time-dependent release of Ni (b).
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Fig2: In vitroNi release from Ni-nanoball suspensions through a dialysis membrane. Experimental setup (a) and time-dependent release of Ni (b).

Mentions: Ni nanoballs were synthesized according to the method described by Toriyabe et al. [9] Ni nanoballs were dispersed in distilled water (DW) and 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution (PBS) at pH =5.8 to reach a concentration of 500 ppm of Ni nanoballs. In the in vitro test of Ni-ion release, the experimental setup used for examining Ni permeation through the dialysis membrane was prepared as shown in Figure 2a. The inner cylinder was filled with 500 μL of Ni-nanoball suspension in DW and PBS (pH =5.8) and immersed in 2500 μL of DW for 1 h to 7 days. Evaluation of the permeated Ni in the outer DW solution was based on a colorimetric reaction using 2-(5-Nitro-2-pyridylazo)-5-[N-n-propyl-N-(3-sulfopropyl)amino]phenol disodium salt dehydrate (Nitro-PAPS), which results in the Ni complex and shows a characteristic absorption around 568 nm (Additional file 1: Figure S1). Then, 500 μL of the outer solution was mixed with 2.0 mL of Nitro-PAPS aqueous solution (20 ppm), and the Ni concentration was estimated by the absorbance at 568 nm using the optical absorption (UV-Vis) spectrometer based on Yamashita et al. [10]. The standard Ni solutions (0.2-10 ppm) were prepared by diluting a 1 mg/mL Ni(NO3)2 solution with DW.Figure 2


Novel metal allergy patch test using metal nanoballs.

Sugiyama T, Uo M, Wada T, Hongo T, Omagari D, Komiyama K, Sasaki H, Takahashi H, Kusama M, Mori Y - J Nanobiotechnology (2014)

In vitroNi release from Ni-nanoball suspensions through a dialysis membrane. Experimental setup (a) and time-dependent release of Ni (b).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4260209&req=5

Fig2: In vitroNi release from Ni-nanoball suspensions through a dialysis membrane. Experimental setup (a) and time-dependent release of Ni (b).
Mentions: Ni nanoballs were synthesized according to the method described by Toriyabe et al. [9] Ni nanoballs were dispersed in distilled water (DW) and 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution (PBS) at pH =5.8 to reach a concentration of 500 ppm of Ni nanoballs. In the in vitro test of Ni-ion release, the experimental setup used for examining Ni permeation through the dialysis membrane was prepared as shown in Figure 2a. The inner cylinder was filled with 500 μL of Ni-nanoball suspension in DW and PBS (pH =5.8) and immersed in 2500 μL of DW for 1 h to 7 days. Evaluation of the permeated Ni in the outer DW solution was based on a colorimetric reaction using 2-(5-Nitro-2-pyridylazo)-5-[N-n-propyl-N-(3-sulfopropyl)amino]phenol disodium salt dehydrate (Nitro-PAPS), which results in the Ni complex and shows a characteristic absorption around 568 nm (Additional file 1: Figure S1). Then, 500 μL of the outer solution was mixed with 2.0 mL of Nitro-PAPS aqueous solution (20 ppm), and the Ni concentration was estimated by the absorbance at 568 nm using the optical absorption (UV-Vis) spectrometer based on Yamashita et al. [10]. The standard Ni solutions (0.2-10 ppm) were prepared by diluting a 1 mg/mL Ni(NO3)2 solution with DW.Figure 2

Bottom Line: Consequently, in the new test system, reactions caused by high concentrations of metal salts were avoided.By exploiting the high specific surface area of Ni nanoballs, we obtained an effective dissolution of Ni ions that triggered Ni allergy in the absence of direct contact between the nanoballs and mouse skin.This novel patch system can be applied to other metals and alloys for diagnosing various types of metal-induced contact dermatitis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dentistry, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Jichi Medical University, 3311-1 Yakushiji, Shimotsuke, Tochigi, 329-0498, Japan. tomoko_s@jichi.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT

Background: Patch tests are often used in the clinical diagnosis of metal allergies. In currently available patch tests, high concentrations of metal salt solutions are used. However, diagnosis accuracy can be influenced not only by acute skin reactions to high concentrations of metal salt, but also by skin reactions to other components present in the patch or to pH changes. In this study, we developed Ni nanoparticles (termed "nanoballs") for use in patch-test solutions.

Findings: Highly soluble, spherical Ni nanoballs were prepared using plasma electrolysis. The Ni released from the nanoballs permeated through a dialysis membrane, and the nanoball-containing solution's pH was maintained constant. Ni ions were released slowly at low concentrations in a time-dependent manner, which contrasted the rapid release observed in the case of a commercial patch test. Consequently, in the new test system, reactions caused by high concentrations of metal salts were avoided.

Conclusions: By exploiting the high specific surface area of Ni nanoballs, we obtained an effective dissolution of Ni ions that triggered Ni allergy in the absence of direct contact between the nanoballs and mouse skin. This novel patch system can be applied to other metals and alloys for diagnosing various types of metal-induced contact dermatitis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus