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Endoscopic diagnosis of duodenal stenosis in a 5-month-old male infant.

Nicholson MR, Acra SA, Chung DH, Rosen MJ - Clin Endosc (2014)

Bottom Line: Duodenal stenosis and duodenal atresia are well-known gastrointestinal anomalies in patients with Down syndrome.Although duodenal atresia presents early and classically with vomiting in the immediate neonatal period, the presentation of duodenal stenosis can be significantly more subtle and the diagnosis delayed.Here, we describe the case of a 5-month-old male infant with Down syndrome and delayed presentation of high-grade duodenal stenosis diagnosed endoscopically.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA.

ABSTRACT
Duodenal stenosis and duodenal atresia are well-known gastrointestinal anomalies in patients with Down syndrome. Although duodenal atresia presents early and classically with vomiting in the immediate neonatal period, the presentation of duodenal stenosis can be significantly more subtle and the diagnosis delayed. Here, we describe the case of a 5-month-old male infant with Down syndrome and delayed presentation of high-grade duodenal stenosis diagnosed endoscopically. Pediatric gastroenterologists should include duodenal stenosis in the differential diagnosis of older infants and children with vomiting and should be familiar with the endoscopic appearance of this lesion.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Upper gastrointestinal series showing a dilated duodenal bulb and narrowing of the second portion of the duodenum (arrows), consistent with congenital duodenal stenosis.
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Figure 2: Upper gastrointestinal series showing a dilated duodenal bulb and narrowing of the second portion of the duodenum (arrows), consistent with congenital duodenal stenosis.

Mentions: An upper gastrointestinal series (Fig. 2) demonstrated a markedly dilated duodenal bulb and narrowing of the second portion of the duodenum (arrows), confirming the suspicion of duodenal stenosis. The infant was treated with a diamond-shaped duodenoduodenostomy. Intestinal malrotation was also identified at the time of surgery; and therefore, the patient underwent Ladd's procedure. He recovered uneventfully and had an uncomplicated postoperative course.


Endoscopic diagnosis of duodenal stenosis in a 5-month-old male infant.

Nicholson MR, Acra SA, Chung DH, Rosen MJ - Clin Endosc (2014)

Upper gastrointestinal series showing a dilated duodenal bulb and narrowing of the second portion of the duodenum (arrows), consistent with congenital duodenal stenosis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4260107&req=5

Figure 2: Upper gastrointestinal series showing a dilated duodenal bulb and narrowing of the second portion of the duodenum (arrows), consistent with congenital duodenal stenosis.
Mentions: An upper gastrointestinal series (Fig. 2) demonstrated a markedly dilated duodenal bulb and narrowing of the second portion of the duodenum (arrows), confirming the suspicion of duodenal stenosis. The infant was treated with a diamond-shaped duodenoduodenostomy. Intestinal malrotation was also identified at the time of surgery; and therefore, the patient underwent Ladd's procedure. He recovered uneventfully and had an uncomplicated postoperative course.

Bottom Line: Duodenal stenosis and duodenal atresia are well-known gastrointestinal anomalies in patients with Down syndrome.Although duodenal atresia presents early and classically with vomiting in the immediate neonatal period, the presentation of duodenal stenosis can be significantly more subtle and the diagnosis delayed.Here, we describe the case of a 5-month-old male infant with Down syndrome and delayed presentation of high-grade duodenal stenosis diagnosed endoscopically.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA.

ABSTRACT
Duodenal stenosis and duodenal atresia are well-known gastrointestinal anomalies in patients with Down syndrome. Although duodenal atresia presents early and classically with vomiting in the immediate neonatal period, the presentation of duodenal stenosis can be significantly more subtle and the diagnosis delayed. Here, we describe the case of a 5-month-old male infant with Down syndrome and delayed presentation of high-grade duodenal stenosis diagnosed endoscopically. Pediatric gastroenterologists should include duodenal stenosis in the differential diagnosis of older infants and children with vomiting and should be familiar with the endoscopic appearance of this lesion.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus