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The use of pharmacogenomics for selection of therapy in non-small-cell lung cancer.

Karim NA, Bui H, Pathrose P, Starnes S, Patil N, Shehata M, Mostafa A, Rao M, Zarzour A, Anderson M - Clin Med Insights Oncol (2014)

Bottom Line: Improved PS, female gender, and gemcitabine therapy were significantly associated with longer overall survival (P = 0.004, P = 0.04, and P = 0.003, respectively).Age was not associated with survival.There was no significant association between any of the pharmacogenomics markers and overall survival other than in patients treated with platinum, in whom ERCC1 negativity was strongly associated with longer survival (P = 0.007).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Performance status (PS) is the only known clinical predictor of outcome in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), although pharmacogenomic markers may also correlate with outcome. The aim of our study was to correlate clinical and pharmacogenomic measures with overall survival.

Methods: This was an IRB approved, retrospective study in which the medical records of 50 patients with advanced NSCLC from 1998-2008 were reviewed, and gender, race, PS, and chemotherapy regimens were documented. Stromal expression of pharmacogenomic markers (VEGFR, ERCC1, 14-3-3σ, pAKT, and PTEN) was measured. Clinical factors and pharmacogenomics markers were compared to overall survival using a Cox proportional hazards model.

Results: Forty patients received platinum-based therapy. Median age was 65 years. Improved PS, female gender, and gemcitabine therapy were significantly associated with longer overall survival (P = 0.004, P = 0.04, and P = 0.003, respectively). Age was not associated with survival. Caucasians had better overall survival in comparison to African Americans with median survival of 14.8 months versus 10.4 months (P = 0.1). Patients treated with platinum-based therapy had better survival of 15 months versus 8 months for non-platinum based therapy (P = 0.01). There was no significant association between any of the pharmacogenomics markers and overall survival other than in patients treated with platinum, in whom ERCC1 negativity was strongly associated with longer survival (P = 0.007).

Conclusion: ERCC1 negativity with platinum therapy, gemcitabine therapy, good PS, and female gender all correlated with improved overall survival in patients with advanced NSCLC.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Overall survival in our studied male and female patients.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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f2-cmo-8-2014-139: Overall survival in our studied male and female patients.

Mentions: Fifty patients with histologically proven NSCLC of advanced stage (stage III or IV) were included in our study. Forty patients received a platinum-based chemotherapy regimen, while 10 received non-platinum based regimens. Median age was 65 years (range 42–84); age did not correlate with OS (Overall Survival) (P = 0.24). ECOG PS was 0 in 8 patients (16%), 1 in 29 patients (58%), 2 in 7 patients (14%), and 3 in 6 patients (14%). ECOG PS of 0 and 1 were significantly associated with higher overall survival (P = 0.004). Females had significantly longer survival compared to males (31.7 months versus 12.4 months, P = 0.04) as shown in Figure 2 and Table 1. Caucasians had better overall survival in comparison to African Americans with median survival of 14.8 months versus 10.4 months, although this did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.1) as shown in Table 1.


The use of pharmacogenomics for selection of therapy in non-small-cell lung cancer.

Karim NA, Bui H, Pathrose P, Starnes S, Patil N, Shehata M, Mostafa A, Rao M, Zarzour A, Anderson M - Clin Med Insights Oncol (2014)

Overall survival in our studied male and female patients.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4259862&req=5

f2-cmo-8-2014-139: Overall survival in our studied male and female patients.
Mentions: Fifty patients with histologically proven NSCLC of advanced stage (stage III or IV) were included in our study. Forty patients received a platinum-based chemotherapy regimen, while 10 received non-platinum based regimens. Median age was 65 years (range 42–84); age did not correlate with OS (Overall Survival) (P = 0.24). ECOG PS was 0 in 8 patients (16%), 1 in 29 patients (58%), 2 in 7 patients (14%), and 3 in 6 patients (14%). ECOG PS of 0 and 1 were significantly associated with higher overall survival (P = 0.004). Females had significantly longer survival compared to males (31.7 months versus 12.4 months, P = 0.04) as shown in Figure 2 and Table 1. Caucasians had better overall survival in comparison to African Americans with median survival of 14.8 months versus 10.4 months, although this did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.1) as shown in Table 1.

Bottom Line: Improved PS, female gender, and gemcitabine therapy were significantly associated with longer overall survival (P = 0.004, P = 0.04, and P = 0.003, respectively).Age was not associated with survival.There was no significant association between any of the pharmacogenomics markers and overall survival other than in patients treated with platinum, in whom ERCC1 negativity was strongly associated with longer survival (P = 0.007).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Performance status (PS) is the only known clinical predictor of outcome in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), although pharmacogenomic markers may also correlate with outcome. The aim of our study was to correlate clinical and pharmacogenomic measures with overall survival.

Methods: This was an IRB approved, retrospective study in which the medical records of 50 patients with advanced NSCLC from 1998-2008 were reviewed, and gender, race, PS, and chemotherapy regimens were documented. Stromal expression of pharmacogenomic markers (VEGFR, ERCC1, 14-3-3σ, pAKT, and PTEN) was measured. Clinical factors and pharmacogenomics markers were compared to overall survival using a Cox proportional hazards model.

Results: Forty patients received platinum-based therapy. Median age was 65 years. Improved PS, female gender, and gemcitabine therapy were significantly associated with longer overall survival (P = 0.004, P = 0.04, and P = 0.003, respectively). Age was not associated with survival. Caucasians had better overall survival in comparison to African Americans with median survival of 14.8 months versus 10.4 months (P = 0.1). Patients treated with platinum-based therapy had better survival of 15 months versus 8 months for non-platinum based therapy (P = 0.01). There was no significant association between any of the pharmacogenomics markers and overall survival other than in patients treated with platinum, in whom ERCC1 negativity was strongly associated with longer survival (P = 0.007).

Conclusion: ERCC1 negativity with platinum therapy, gemcitabine therapy, good PS, and female gender all correlated with improved overall survival in patients with advanced NSCLC.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus