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Agreement and reliability of tinnitus loudness matching and pitch likeness rating.

Hoare DJ, Edmondson-Jones M, Gander PE, Hall DA - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Group level data indicated a significant effect of time between test session 1 and 2 for loudness matching, likely procedural or perceptual learning, which needs to be accounted in study design.Pitch likeness rating across multiple frequencies appeared inherently more variable and with no systematic effect of time.This has implications for prescription of some sound-based interventions that rely on accurate measures of individual dominant tinnitus pitch.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute for Health Research, Nottingham Hearing Biomedical Research Unit, Nottingham, United Kingdom; Otology and Hearing Group, Division of Clinical Neuroscience, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
The ability to reproducibly match tinnitus loudness and pitch is important to research and clinical management. Here we examine agreement and reliability of tinnitus loudness matching and pitch likeness ratings when using a computer-based method to measure the tinnitus spectrum and estimate a dominant tinnitus pitch, using tonal or narrowband sounds. Group level data indicated a significant effect of time between test session 1 and 2 for loudness matching, likely procedural or perceptual learning, which needs to be accounted in study design. Pitch likeness rating across multiple frequencies appeared inherently more variable and with no systematic effect of time. Dominant pitch estimates reached a level of clinical acceptability when sessions were spaced two weeks apart. However when dominant tinnitus pitch assessments were separated by three months, acceptable agreement was achieved only for group mean data, not for individual estimates. This has implications for prescription of some sound-based interventions that rely on accurate measures of individual dominant tinnitus pitch.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Example data from a Study 1 participant with ‘atonal’ tinnitus.In Step 3 of the ‘Tinnitus Tester’ participant selected different bandwidths across sessions (selection in brackets). Data are presented as mean ± SD for each test frequency. Loudness match is reported as the PA5 attenuator value, 0 attenuation (maximum output of the system) was 96 dB SPL.
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pone-0114553-g002: Example data from a Study 1 participant with ‘atonal’ tinnitus.In Step 3 of the ‘Tinnitus Tester’ participant selected different bandwidths across sessions (selection in brackets). Data are presented as mean ± SD for each test frequency. Loudness match is reported as the PA5 attenuator value, 0 attenuation (maximum output of the system) was 96 dB SPL.

Mentions: Figures 1 and 2 showcase data to demonstrate the types of variability observed across and between the data for individual participants. Figure 1 shows data from a participant who consistently selected ‘Tonal’ in Step 3. In this example, the pattern of loudness matching data is particularly well conserved across sessions, with very little deviation from mean values in any case. In contrast, the pattern or ‘spectrum’ generated in the pitch matching exercise shows less consistency. For individual frequencies the standard deviation of the pitch estimate is reduced in later sessions possibly due to some learning taking place. Moreover, few of the spectra represent tonal tinnitus. In particular, in Sessions 4 and 5 the spectrum is quite flat. This may represent an inability to perform the procedure or actual changes in the components of the individual's tinnitus over time.


Agreement and reliability of tinnitus loudness matching and pitch likeness rating.

Hoare DJ, Edmondson-Jones M, Gander PE, Hall DA - PLoS ONE (2014)

Example data from a Study 1 participant with ‘atonal’ tinnitus.In Step 3 of the ‘Tinnitus Tester’ participant selected different bandwidths across sessions (selection in brackets). Data are presented as mean ± SD for each test frequency. Loudness match is reported as the PA5 attenuator value, 0 attenuation (maximum output of the system) was 96 dB SPL.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4257689&req=5

pone-0114553-g002: Example data from a Study 1 participant with ‘atonal’ tinnitus.In Step 3 of the ‘Tinnitus Tester’ participant selected different bandwidths across sessions (selection in brackets). Data are presented as mean ± SD for each test frequency. Loudness match is reported as the PA5 attenuator value, 0 attenuation (maximum output of the system) was 96 dB SPL.
Mentions: Figures 1 and 2 showcase data to demonstrate the types of variability observed across and between the data for individual participants. Figure 1 shows data from a participant who consistently selected ‘Tonal’ in Step 3. In this example, the pattern of loudness matching data is particularly well conserved across sessions, with very little deviation from mean values in any case. In contrast, the pattern or ‘spectrum’ generated in the pitch matching exercise shows less consistency. For individual frequencies the standard deviation of the pitch estimate is reduced in later sessions possibly due to some learning taking place. Moreover, few of the spectra represent tonal tinnitus. In particular, in Sessions 4 and 5 the spectrum is quite flat. This may represent an inability to perform the procedure or actual changes in the components of the individual's tinnitus over time.

Bottom Line: Group level data indicated a significant effect of time between test session 1 and 2 for loudness matching, likely procedural or perceptual learning, which needs to be accounted in study design.Pitch likeness rating across multiple frequencies appeared inherently more variable and with no systematic effect of time.This has implications for prescription of some sound-based interventions that rely on accurate measures of individual dominant tinnitus pitch.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute for Health Research, Nottingham Hearing Biomedical Research Unit, Nottingham, United Kingdom; Otology and Hearing Group, Division of Clinical Neuroscience, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
The ability to reproducibly match tinnitus loudness and pitch is important to research and clinical management. Here we examine agreement and reliability of tinnitus loudness matching and pitch likeness ratings when using a computer-based method to measure the tinnitus spectrum and estimate a dominant tinnitus pitch, using tonal or narrowband sounds. Group level data indicated a significant effect of time between test session 1 and 2 for loudness matching, likely procedural or perceptual learning, which needs to be accounted in study design. Pitch likeness rating across multiple frequencies appeared inherently more variable and with no systematic effect of time. Dominant pitch estimates reached a level of clinical acceptability when sessions were spaced two weeks apart. However when dominant tinnitus pitch assessments were separated by three months, acceptable agreement was achieved only for group mean data, not for individual estimates. This has implications for prescription of some sound-based interventions that rely on accurate measures of individual dominant tinnitus pitch.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus