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Sustained, area-wide control of Aedes aegypti using CDC autocidal gravid ovitraps.

Barrera R, Amador M, Acevedo V, Hemme RR, Félix G - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. (2014)

Bottom Line: We have shown that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) autocidal gravid ovitraps (AGO trap) reduced the Aedes aegypti population and prevented mosquito outbreaks in southern Puerto Rico.We monitored mosquitoes and weather every week in all four sites.Mosquito density in the former reference area decreased 79% and mosquito density in the new reference areas was 88% greater than in the intervention areas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Entomology and Ecology Activity, Dengue Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Calle Canada, San Juan, Puerto Rico rbarrera@cdc.gov.

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Changes in average Ae. aegypti females per trap per week in the new intervention area (IA-II; Villodas) after placing autocidal gravid ovitraps (AGO traps) in February 2013 and in the previous intervention area (IA-I; La Margarita) where AGO traps had been in place since December 2011.
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Figure 2: Changes in average Ae. aegypti females per trap per week in the new intervention area (IA-II; Villodas) after placing autocidal gravid ovitraps (AGO traps) in February 2013 and in the previous intervention area (IA-I; La Margarita) where AGO traps had been in place since December 2011.

Mentions: There was an average reduction of 79% in the number of female Ae. aegypti per trap per week after placing the AGO intervention traps in IA-II (estimated means ± 95% confidence interval [CI]; before = 5.7; 5.0–6.6, after = 1.2; 1.0–1.4; Figure 2). The GLMM model showed significant effects of trap placement (before, after; F1, 2425 = 798.3, P < 0.001), week after trap servicing (F7, 2425 = 5.9, P < 0.001), rainfall (F1, 2425 = 16.3, P < 0.001), relative humidity (F1, 2425 = 47.2, P < 0.001), and temperature (F1, 2425 = 5.2, P < 0.05).


Sustained, area-wide control of Aedes aegypti using CDC autocidal gravid ovitraps.

Barrera R, Amador M, Acevedo V, Hemme RR, Félix G - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. (2014)

Changes in average Ae. aegypti females per trap per week in the new intervention area (IA-II; Villodas) after placing autocidal gravid ovitraps (AGO traps) in February 2013 and in the previous intervention area (IA-I; La Margarita) where AGO traps had been in place since December 2011.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4257658&req=5

Figure 2: Changes in average Ae. aegypti females per trap per week in the new intervention area (IA-II; Villodas) after placing autocidal gravid ovitraps (AGO traps) in February 2013 and in the previous intervention area (IA-I; La Margarita) where AGO traps had been in place since December 2011.
Mentions: There was an average reduction of 79% in the number of female Ae. aegypti per trap per week after placing the AGO intervention traps in IA-II (estimated means ± 95% confidence interval [CI]; before = 5.7; 5.0–6.6, after = 1.2; 1.0–1.4; Figure 2). The GLMM model showed significant effects of trap placement (before, after; F1, 2425 = 798.3, P < 0.001), week after trap servicing (F7, 2425 = 5.9, P < 0.001), rainfall (F1, 2425 = 16.3, P < 0.001), relative humidity (F1, 2425 = 47.2, P < 0.001), and temperature (F1, 2425 = 5.2, P < 0.05).

Bottom Line: We have shown that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) autocidal gravid ovitraps (AGO trap) reduced the Aedes aegypti population and prevented mosquito outbreaks in southern Puerto Rico.We monitored mosquitoes and weather every week in all four sites.Mosquito density in the former reference area decreased 79% and mosquito density in the new reference areas was 88% greater than in the intervention areas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Entomology and Ecology Activity, Dengue Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Calle Canada, San Juan, Puerto Rico rbarrera@cdc.gov.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus