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Filarial antigenemia and Loa loa night blood microfilaremia in an area without bancroftian filariasis in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Bakajika DK, Nigo MM, Lotsima JP, Masikini GA, Fischer K, Lloyd MM, Weil GJ, Fischer PU - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. (2014)

Bottom Line: Filarial antigenemia rates by card test exceeded 1% in 28 villages (range = 0-14%).Filarial antigen positivity was strongly associated with high L. loa Mf counts.Periodicity studies revealed atypical patterns, with no significant diurnal periodicity in some individuals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Programme National de Lutte contre L'Onchocercose, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo; Centre de Recherche en Maladies Tropicales de l'Ituri, Ituri, Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo; Infectious Diseases Division, Department of Internal Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri.

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Periodicity of L. loa Mf in seven patients with L. loa Mf in night blood smears. One subject (subject 4) had no Mf at the time of reexamination. The others had variable periodicity patterns that were diurnal (subjects 2 and 3), diurnally subperiodic (subject 5), and aperiodic (subjects 6 and 7); 60-μL finger prick blood samples were collected at (a) 21:00, (b) 05:00, and (c) 13:00 hours, and Mf densities were determined by microscopy. The species identification was confirmed to be L. loa in all cases by qPCR.
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Figure 3: Periodicity of L. loa Mf in seven patients with L. loa Mf in night blood smears. One subject (subject 4) had no Mf at the time of reexamination. The others had variable periodicity patterns that were diurnal (subjects 2 and 3), diurnally subperiodic (subject 5), and aperiodic (subjects 6 and 7); 60-μL finger prick blood samples were collected at (a) 21:00, (b) 05:00, and (c) 13:00 hours, and Mf densities were determined by microscopy. The species identification was confirmed to be L. loa in all cases by qPCR.

Mentions: Periodicity studies were performed because of the unexpected finding that L. loa Mf were commonly seen in night blood. Finger prick blood was collected at 21:00, 05:00, and 13:00 hours from seven people that had L. loa Mf present in night blood samples during the first survey in 2011. All of these individuals were coinfected with M. perstans at that time, with Mf densities between 333 and 8,413 Mf/mL. At the time of reexamination in 2012, one man was Mf-negative, and the others had night blood L. loa Mf counts between 608 and 31,728 Mf/mL. Two individuals (subjects 2 and 3) had a diurnally periodic pattern, with almost no Mf at 21:00 and 05:00 hours but high counts of > 25,000 Mf/mL at 13:00 hours (Figure 3). Subjects 1 and 5 had diurnally subperiodic patterns, and two individuals (subjects 6 and 7) had aperiodic patterns, with > 20,000 Mf/mL at all three time points. These results show that L. loa exhibits atypical periodicity in some subjects in the study area, and many subjects had high Mf counts in night blood.


Filarial antigenemia and Loa loa night blood microfilaremia in an area without bancroftian filariasis in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Bakajika DK, Nigo MM, Lotsima JP, Masikini GA, Fischer K, Lloyd MM, Weil GJ, Fischer PU - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. (2014)

Periodicity of L. loa Mf in seven patients with L. loa Mf in night blood smears. One subject (subject 4) had no Mf at the time of reexamination. The others had variable periodicity patterns that were diurnal (subjects 2 and 3), diurnally subperiodic (subject 5), and aperiodic (subjects 6 and 7); 60-μL finger prick blood samples were collected at (a) 21:00, (b) 05:00, and (c) 13:00 hours, and Mf densities were determined by microscopy. The species identification was confirmed to be L. loa in all cases by qPCR.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4257636&req=5

Figure 3: Periodicity of L. loa Mf in seven patients with L. loa Mf in night blood smears. One subject (subject 4) had no Mf at the time of reexamination. The others had variable periodicity patterns that were diurnal (subjects 2 and 3), diurnally subperiodic (subject 5), and aperiodic (subjects 6 and 7); 60-μL finger prick blood samples were collected at (a) 21:00, (b) 05:00, and (c) 13:00 hours, and Mf densities were determined by microscopy. The species identification was confirmed to be L. loa in all cases by qPCR.
Mentions: Periodicity studies were performed because of the unexpected finding that L. loa Mf were commonly seen in night blood. Finger prick blood was collected at 21:00, 05:00, and 13:00 hours from seven people that had L. loa Mf present in night blood samples during the first survey in 2011. All of these individuals were coinfected with M. perstans at that time, with Mf densities between 333 and 8,413 Mf/mL. At the time of reexamination in 2012, one man was Mf-negative, and the others had night blood L. loa Mf counts between 608 and 31,728 Mf/mL. Two individuals (subjects 2 and 3) had a diurnally periodic pattern, with almost no Mf at 21:00 and 05:00 hours but high counts of > 25,000 Mf/mL at 13:00 hours (Figure 3). Subjects 1 and 5 had diurnally subperiodic patterns, and two individuals (subjects 6 and 7) had aperiodic patterns, with > 20,000 Mf/mL at all three time points. These results show that L. loa exhibits atypical periodicity in some subjects in the study area, and many subjects had high Mf counts in night blood.

Bottom Line: Filarial antigenemia rates by card test exceeded 1% in 28 villages (range = 0-14%).Filarial antigen positivity was strongly associated with high L. loa Mf counts.Periodicity studies revealed atypical patterns, with no significant diurnal periodicity in some individuals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Programme National de Lutte contre L'Onchocercose, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo; Centre de Recherche en Maladies Tropicales de l'Ituri, Ituri, Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo; Infectious Diseases Division, Department of Internal Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus