Limits...
Status of simulation in health care education: an international survey.

Qayumi K, Pachev G, Zheng B, Ziv A, Koval V, Badiei S, Cheng A - Adv Med Educ Pract (2014)

Bottom Line: We utilized a two-stage process, including an online survey and a site visit that included interviews and debriefings.Forty-two simulation centers worldwide participated in this study, the results of which show that despite enormous interest and enthusiasm in the health care community, use of simulation in health care education is limited to specific areas and is not a budgeted item in many institutions.Specific recommendations are made based on current findings to support simulation in the next developmental stages.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center of Excellence for Simulation Education and Innovation, Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Simulation is rapidly penetrating the terrain of health care education and has gained growing acceptance as an educational method and patient safety tool. Despite this, the state of simulation in health care education has not yet been evaluated on a global scale. In this project, we studied the global status of simulation in health care education by determining the degree of financial support, infrastructure, manpower, information technology capabilities, engagement of groups of learners, and research and scholarly activities, as well as the barriers, strengths, opportunities for growth, and other aspects of simulation in health care education. We utilized a two-stage process, including an online survey and a site visit that included interviews and debriefings. Forty-two simulation centers worldwide participated in this study, the results of which show that despite enormous interest and enthusiasm in the health care community, use of simulation in health care education is limited to specific areas and is not a budgeted item in many institutions. Absence of a sustainable business model, as well as sufficient financial support in terms of budget, infrastructure, manpower, research, and scholarly activities, slows down the movement of simulation. Specific recommendations are made based on current findings to support simulation in the next developmental stages.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Average Activity Index values for different simulation types.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4257018&req=5

f3-amep-5-457: Average Activity Index values for different simulation types.

Mentions: As measured by the Activity Index, on-line simulation modules were by far the most used modality of learning. The next three most used types of simulation were task trainers, low fidelity human patient simulation, and high fidelity human patient simulation (Figure 3). Low fidelity human patient simulation, high fidelity human patient simulation, and task trainers were the three types of simulation modalities most commonly available for use (Table 3).


Status of simulation in health care education: an international survey.

Qayumi K, Pachev G, Zheng B, Ziv A, Koval V, Badiei S, Cheng A - Adv Med Educ Pract (2014)

Average Activity Index values for different simulation types.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4257018&req=5

f3-amep-5-457: Average Activity Index values for different simulation types.
Mentions: As measured by the Activity Index, on-line simulation modules were by far the most used modality of learning. The next three most used types of simulation were task trainers, low fidelity human patient simulation, and high fidelity human patient simulation (Figure 3). Low fidelity human patient simulation, high fidelity human patient simulation, and task trainers were the three types of simulation modalities most commonly available for use (Table 3).

Bottom Line: We utilized a two-stage process, including an online survey and a site visit that included interviews and debriefings.Forty-two simulation centers worldwide participated in this study, the results of which show that despite enormous interest and enthusiasm in the health care community, use of simulation in health care education is limited to specific areas and is not a budgeted item in many institutions.Specific recommendations are made based on current findings to support simulation in the next developmental stages.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center of Excellence for Simulation Education and Innovation, Department of Surgery, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Simulation is rapidly penetrating the terrain of health care education and has gained growing acceptance as an educational method and patient safety tool. Despite this, the state of simulation in health care education has not yet been evaluated on a global scale. In this project, we studied the global status of simulation in health care education by determining the degree of financial support, infrastructure, manpower, information technology capabilities, engagement of groups of learners, and research and scholarly activities, as well as the barriers, strengths, opportunities for growth, and other aspects of simulation in health care education. We utilized a two-stage process, including an online survey and a site visit that included interviews and debriefings. Forty-two simulation centers worldwide participated in this study, the results of which show that despite enormous interest and enthusiasm in the health care community, use of simulation in health care education is limited to specific areas and is not a budgeted item in many institutions. Absence of a sustainable business model, as well as sufficient financial support in terms of budget, infrastructure, manpower, research, and scholarly activities, slows down the movement of simulation. Specific recommendations are made based on current findings to support simulation in the next developmental stages.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus