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Repeatable change in electrical resistance of Si surface by mechanical and electrical nanoprocessing.

Miyake S, Suzuki S - Nanoscale Res Lett (2014)

Bottom Line: The properties of mechanically and electrically processed silicon surfaces were evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM).After the electrical processing, protuberances were generated and the electric current through the silicon surface decreased because of local anodic oxidation.With sequential processing, the local oxide layer formed by electrical processing can be removed by mechanical processing using the same tip without vibration.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Innovative System Engineering, Nippon Institute of Technology, 4-1 Gakuendai, Miyashiro-machi, Saitama 345-8501, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The properties of mechanically and electrically processed silicon surfaces were evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Silicon specimens were processed using an electrically conductive diamond tip with and without vibration. After the electrical processing, protuberances were generated and the electric current through the silicon surface decreased because of local anodic oxidation. Grooves were formed by mechanical processing without vibration, and the electric current increased. In contrast, mechanical processing with vibration caused the surface to protuberate and the electrical resistance increased similar to that observed for electrical processing. With sequential processing, the local oxide layer formed by electrical processing can be removed by mechanical processing using the same tip without vibration. Although the electrical resistance is decreased by the mechanical processing without vibration, additional electrical processing on the mechanically processed area further increases the electrical resistance of the surface.

No MeSH data available.


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Dependence of processing depth and surface current on processing load and voltage. (a) Processing depth. (b) Current.
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Figure 6: Dependence of processing depth and surface current on processing load and voltage. (a) Processing depth. (b) Current.

Mentions: The processed surface and cross-sectional profiles of Si subjected to electrical processing with 10 nm amplitude vibration are shown in Figure 5a. The observed protuberance was formed via the anodic oxidation of Si by oxygen and moisture on the Si surface. The nine squares were processed at applied voltages of 0.5 to 4.5 V. The protuberance height increased with the applied voltage and was 0.12, 0.32, and 0.60 nm at 0.5, 3.0, and 4.5 V, respectively. The protuberance heights of areas processed without and with vibration at 10 and 50 nm amplitudes were about 0.44, 0.60, and 0.71 nm at 4.5 V applied voltage, respectively. The protuberance height increased with vibration amplitude. The heights of the protuberances formed by electrical processing with vibration at a high voltage were higher than those by mechanical processing with vibration.Current distribution images of these electrically processed areas are shown in Figure 5b. The currents measured in the electrically processed areas were decreased compared with that of the unprocessed area as a result of the increase in electric resistance caused by anodic oxidation.The friction force of the electrically processed areas increased clearly with applied voltage, as shown in Figure 5c. The changes in the friction of the areas electrically processed at a high voltage were higher than those observed for the mechanically processed areas. This enhanced increase in friction force was caused by the advance of oxidization with applied voltage.The dependences of the removal depth and protuberance height of the processed areas on load and voltage are shown in Figure 6a. For mechanical processing, remarkably deep removal depths were obtained without vibration up to a maximum of 8 nm. However, when vibration was added, the surface was protuberated by mechanochemical reaction. The maximum height of the protuberances became low, about 0.14 nm. In contrast, the heights of protuberances formed by electrical processing with vibration were higher than those of areas mechanically processed with vibration. The height of the protuberance formed by electrical processing with 10 nm amplitude vibration at 4.5 V was nearly 0.6 nm.


Repeatable change in electrical resistance of Si surface by mechanical and electrical nanoprocessing.

Miyake S, Suzuki S - Nanoscale Res Lett (2014)

Dependence of processing depth and surface current on processing load and voltage. (a) Processing depth. (b) Current.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4256973&req=5

Figure 6: Dependence of processing depth and surface current on processing load and voltage. (a) Processing depth. (b) Current.
Mentions: The processed surface and cross-sectional profiles of Si subjected to electrical processing with 10 nm amplitude vibration are shown in Figure 5a. The observed protuberance was formed via the anodic oxidation of Si by oxygen and moisture on the Si surface. The nine squares were processed at applied voltages of 0.5 to 4.5 V. The protuberance height increased with the applied voltage and was 0.12, 0.32, and 0.60 nm at 0.5, 3.0, and 4.5 V, respectively. The protuberance heights of areas processed without and with vibration at 10 and 50 nm amplitudes were about 0.44, 0.60, and 0.71 nm at 4.5 V applied voltage, respectively. The protuberance height increased with vibration amplitude. The heights of the protuberances formed by electrical processing with vibration at a high voltage were higher than those by mechanical processing with vibration.Current distribution images of these electrically processed areas are shown in Figure 5b. The currents measured in the electrically processed areas were decreased compared with that of the unprocessed area as a result of the increase in electric resistance caused by anodic oxidation.The friction force of the electrically processed areas increased clearly with applied voltage, as shown in Figure 5c. The changes in the friction of the areas electrically processed at a high voltage were higher than those observed for the mechanically processed areas. This enhanced increase in friction force was caused by the advance of oxidization with applied voltage.The dependences of the removal depth and protuberance height of the processed areas on load and voltage are shown in Figure 6a. For mechanical processing, remarkably deep removal depths were obtained without vibration up to a maximum of 8 nm. However, when vibration was added, the surface was protuberated by mechanochemical reaction. The maximum height of the protuberances became low, about 0.14 nm. In contrast, the heights of protuberances formed by electrical processing with vibration were higher than those of areas mechanically processed with vibration. The height of the protuberance formed by electrical processing with 10 nm amplitude vibration at 4.5 V was nearly 0.6 nm.

Bottom Line: The properties of mechanically and electrically processed silicon surfaces were evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM).After the electrical processing, protuberances were generated and the electric current through the silicon surface decreased because of local anodic oxidation.With sequential processing, the local oxide layer formed by electrical processing can be removed by mechanical processing using the same tip without vibration.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Innovative System Engineering, Nippon Institute of Technology, 4-1 Gakuendai, Miyashiro-machi, Saitama 345-8501, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The properties of mechanically and electrically processed silicon surfaces were evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Silicon specimens were processed using an electrically conductive diamond tip with and without vibration. After the electrical processing, protuberances were generated and the electric current through the silicon surface decreased because of local anodic oxidation. Grooves were formed by mechanical processing without vibration, and the electric current increased. In contrast, mechanical processing with vibration caused the surface to protuberate and the electrical resistance increased similar to that observed for electrical processing. With sequential processing, the local oxide layer formed by electrical processing can be removed by mechanical processing using the same tip without vibration. Although the electrical resistance is decreased by the mechanical processing without vibration, additional electrical processing on the mechanically processed area further increases the electrical resistance of the surface.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus