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Development and evaluation of a cucumber TILLING population.

Fraenkel R, Kovalski I, Troadec C, Bendahmane A, Perl-Treves R - BMC Res Notes (2014)

Bottom Line: We report the development of a TILLING cucumber population, generated by EMS mutagenesis in the Poinsett76 genetic background.Suitability for detecting single nucleotide polymorphism in selected genes has been tested by screening a sample of amplicons, with detection rate of 1 SNP in ~1 Mbp.The population described in this Research Note represents a useful asset in cucumber research, to be exploited for forward genetic screens and functional genomics purposes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Mina and Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel. rafi.perl@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Ordered collections of mutants serve as invaluable tools in biological research. TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes) provides an efficient method to discover, in mutagenized populations, the possible phenotypes controlled by gene sequences whose function is unknown. This method can replace transgenic techniques for the functional validation of cloned genes, especially in the case of transformation-recalcitrant plants such as cucumber.

Results: We report the development of a TILLING cucumber population, generated by EMS mutagenesis in the Poinsett76 genetic background. The population was evaluated by screening for morphological mutations, and a range of developmental, pigmentation and spontaneous lesion mutants were observed. Suitability for detecting single nucleotide polymorphism in selected genes has been tested by screening a sample of amplicons, with detection rate of 1 SNP in ~1 Mbp.

Conclusion: The population described in this Research Note represents a useful asset in cucumber research, to be exploited for forward genetic screens and functional genomics purposes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Selection of morphological mutants at the mature plant stage. Family 38: deeper-lobed leaf (right, compared to wild-type leaf on the left), and smaller male and female flowers (bottom, compared to wt flowers on top). Family 424: pale green plant. Family 164: darker leaf with shallow lobes (left, compared to wt leaf on the right). Family 176: fasciated, sessile inflorescences with reiterated organs, multiple petalled flowers and a branched ovary. Family FX: “cauliflower” mutant with arrested-development, reiterating, inflorescence with dense trichomes and a lanceolate leaf.
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Fig3: Selection of morphological mutants at the mature plant stage. Family 38: deeper-lobed leaf (right, compared to wild-type leaf on the left), and smaller male and female flowers (bottom, compared to wt flowers on top). Family 424: pale green plant. Family 164: darker leaf with shallow lobes (left, compared to wt leaf on the right). Family 176: fasciated, sessile inflorescences with reiterated organs, multiple petalled flowers and a branched ovary. Family FX: “cauliflower” mutant with arrested-development, reiterating, inflorescence with dense trichomes and a lanceolate leaf.

Mentions: Several seedlings that exhibited prominent abnormalities were grown to maturity, and outstanding phenotypes could be seen among the mature plants as well. These included persistent virescent or yellow-leaf character (Family 424), a fasciated plant with floral organ abnormalities and organ-fusions (Family 176), and more; Figure 3 provides a few examples. This demonstrates that the population is a rich source of morphological and developmental mutations that could be tapped using forward-genetic schemes. Since each M1 plant and the descendant M2 family harbors multiple point mutations, genetic analysis will be required to discern them and correlate a specific mutant phenotype with a single molecular event.Figure 3


Development and evaluation of a cucumber TILLING population.

Fraenkel R, Kovalski I, Troadec C, Bendahmane A, Perl-Treves R - BMC Res Notes (2014)

Selection of morphological mutants at the mature plant stage. Family 38: deeper-lobed leaf (right, compared to wild-type leaf on the left), and smaller male and female flowers (bottom, compared to wt flowers on top). Family 424: pale green plant. Family 164: darker leaf with shallow lobes (left, compared to wt leaf on the right). Family 176: fasciated, sessile inflorescences with reiterated organs, multiple petalled flowers and a branched ovary. Family FX: “cauliflower” mutant with arrested-development, reiterating, inflorescence with dense trichomes and a lanceolate leaf.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4256834&req=5

Fig3: Selection of morphological mutants at the mature plant stage. Family 38: deeper-lobed leaf (right, compared to wild-type leaf on the left), and smaller male and female flowers (bottom, compared to wt flowers on top). Family 424: pale green plant. Family 164: darker leaf with shallow lobes (left, compared to wt leaf on the right). Family 176: fasciated, sessile inflorescences with reiterated organs, multiple petalled flowers and a branched ovary. Family FX: “cauliflower” mutant with arrested-development, reiterating, inflorescence with dense trichomes and a lanceolate leaf.
Mentions: Several seedlings that exhibited prominent abnormalities were grown to maturity, and outstanding phenotypes could be seen among the mature plants as well. These included persistent virescent or yellow-leaf character (Family 424), a fasciated plant with floral organ abnormalities and organ-fusions (Family 176), and more; Figure 3 provides a few examples. This demonstrates that the population is a rich source of morphological and developmental mutations that could be tapped using forward-genetic schemes. Since each M1 plant and the descendant M2 family harbors multiple point mutations, genetic analysis will be required to discern them and correlate a specific mutant phenotype with a single molecular event.Figure 3

Bottom Line: We report the development of a TILLING cucumber population, generated by EMS mutagenesis in the Poinsett76 genetic background.Suitability for detecting single nucleotide polymorphism in selected genes has been tested by screening a sample of amplicons, with detection rate of 1 SNP in ~1 Mbp.The population described in this Research Note represents a useful asset in cucumber research, to be exploited for forward genetic screens and functional genomics purposes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Mina and Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel. rafi.perl@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Ordered collections of mutants serve as invaluable tools in biological research. TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes) provides an efficient method to discover, in mutagenized populations, the possible phenotypes controlled by gene sequences whose function is unknown. This method can replace transgenic techniques for the functional validation of cloned genes, especially in the case of transformation-recalcitrant plants such as cucumber.

Results: We report the development of a TILLING cucumber population, generated by EMS mutagenesis in the Poinsett76 genetic background. The population was evaluated by screening for morphological mutations, and a range of developmental, pigmentation and spontaneous lesion mutants were observed. Suitability for detecting single nucleotide polymorphism in selected genes has been tested by screening a sample of amplicons, with detection rate of 1 SNP in ~1 Mbp.

Conclusion: The population described in this Research Note represents a useful asset in cucumber research, to be exploited for forward genetic screens and functional genomics purposes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus