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Are the Norwegian health research investments in line with the disease burden?

Kinge JM, Roxrud I, Vollset SE, Skirbekk V, Røttingen JA - Health Res Policy Syst (2014)

Bottom Line: Generally, when the disease burden was relatively high in Norway compared with the rest of the world, research investments were also high.Across therapeutic areas, the Norwegian research investments appeared aligned with the Norwegian disease burden.The correlation between the Norwegian research investments and the global disease burden was much lower.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Postboks 4404, Nydalen, 0403 Oslo, Norway. jonas.minet.kinge@fhi.no.

ABSTRACT

Background: The relationship between research funding across therapeutic areas and the burden of disease in Norway has not been investigated. Further, few studies have looked at the association between national research investments and the global disease burden. The aim of the present study was to analyze the correlation between a significant part of Norwegian investment in health research and the burden of disease across therapeutic areas, using both Norwegian and global burden of disease estimates.

Methods: We used research investment records for 2012 from the Research Council of Norway, and the investment records distributed through liaison committees between regional health authorities and universities. Both were classified by the Health Research Classification System (HRCS). Furthermore, we used the years of life lost and Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) for Norway and globally from the Global Burden of Disease 2010 project. We created a matrix to match the expenditures by HRCS with the values from the Global Burden of Disease project.

Results: Disease-specific research funding increased with the Norwegian burden of disease measured as years of life lost (correlation coefficient = 0.73). Similar findings were done when the Norwegian disease burden was measured as DALYs (correlation coefficient = 0.62). The correlation between research funding and the global disease burden was low both when years of life lost (correlation coefficient = 0.11) and DALYs (correlation coefficient = 0.12) were used. Generally, when the disease burden was relatively high in Norway compared with the rest of the world, research investments were also high.

Conclusions: Across therapeutic areas, the Norwegian research investments appeared aligned with the Norwegian disease burden. The correlation between the Norwegian research investments and the global disease burden was much lower.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Scatter plot with the association between total research investments and rates (% Norway DALYs/global DALYs). The solid line depicted is the best-fit linear regression line. Blood and Urogen, Blood and Urogenital; Reprod H & Childb, Reproductive health and childbirth.
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Fig2: Scatter plot with the association between total research investments and rates (% Norway DALYs/global DALYs). The solid line depicted is the best-fit linear regression line. Blood and Urogen, Blood and Urogenital; Reprod H & Childb, Reproductive health and childbirth.

Mentions: Figure 2 illustrates the relative Norwegian DALYs to the global DALYs by disease category. This is mapped against the total research investment included in the analysis. As shown in the figure, the burden of musculoskeletal disorders has been especially high in Norway, but the research investments have been relatively low. The burden of diseases related to reproductive health and childbirth as well as infectious diseases was very small in Norway. With the exception of musculoskeletal disorders, the RCN and RHAs invested more in diseases in which the disease burden was high in Norway compared with the rest of the world.Figure 1


Are the Norwegian health research investments in line with the disease burden?

Kinge JM, Roxrud I, Vollset SE, Skirbekk V, Røttingen JA - Health Res Policy Syst (2014)

Scatter plot with the association between total research investments and rates (% Norway DALYs/global DALYs). The solid line depicted is the best-fit linear regression line. Blood and Urogen, Blood and Urogenital; Reprod H & Childb, Reproductive health and childbirth.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4256793&req=5

Fig2: Scatter plot with the association between total research investments and rates (% Norway DALYs/global DALYs). The solid line depicted is the best-fit linear regression line. Blood and Urogen, Blood and Urogenital; Reprod H & Childb, Reproductive health and childbirth.
Mentions: Figure 2 illustrates the relative Norwegian DALYs to the global DALYs by disease category. This is mapped against the total research investment included in the analysis. As shown in the figure, the burden of musculoskeletal disorders has been especially high in Norway, but the research investments have been relatively low. The burden of diseases related to reproductive health and childbirth as well as infectious diseases was very small in Norway. With the exception of musculoskeletal disorders, the RCN and RHAs invested more in diseases in which the disease burden was high in Norway compared with the rest of the world.Figure 1

Bottom Line: Generally, when the disease burden was relatively high in Norway compared with the rest of the world, research investments were also high.Across therapeutic areas, the Norwegian research investments appeared aligned with the Norwegian disease burden.The correlation between the Norwegian research investments and the global disease burden was much lower.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Postboks 4404, Nydalen, 0403 Oslo, Norway. jonas.minet.kinge@fhi.no.

ABSTRACT

Background: The relationship between research funding across therapeutic areas and the burden of disease in Norway has not been investigated. Further, few studies have looked at the association between national research investments and the global disease burden. The aim of the present study was to analyze the correlation between a significant part of Norwegian investment in health research and the burden of disease across therapeutic areas, using both Norwegian and global burden of disease estimates.

Methods: We used research investment records for 2012 from the Research Council of Norway, and the investment records distributed through liaison committees between regional health authorities and universities. Both were classified by the Health Research Classification System (HRCS). Furthermore, we used the years of life lost and Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) for Norway and globally from the Global Burden of Disease 2010 project. We created a matrix to match the expenditures by HRCS with the values from the Global Burden of Disease project.

Results: Disease-specific research funding increased with the Norwegian burden of disease measured as years of life lost (correlation coefficient = 0.73). Similar findings were done when the Norwegian disease burden was measured as DALYs (correlation coefficient = 0.62). The correlation between research funding and the global disease burden was low both when years of life lost (correlation coefficient = 0.11) and DALYs (correlation coefficient = 0.12) were used. Generally, when the disease burden was relatively high in Norway compared with the rest of the world, research investments were also high.

Conclusions: Across therapeutic areas, the Norwegian research investments appeared aligned with the Norwegian disease burden. The correlation between the Norwegian research investments and the global disease burden was much lower.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus