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MicroRNAs influence reproductive responses by females to male sex peptide in Drosophila melanogaster.

Fricke C, Green D, Smith D, Dalmay T, Chapman T - Genetics (2014)

Bottom Line: However, these effects interacted significantly with the genetic background of the miRNA-lacking females.No significant survival effects were observed in miRNA-lacking females housed continually with SP or control males.The results provide the first insight into the effects and importance of miRNAs in regulating postmating responses in females.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, NR4 7TJ United Kingdom Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity, University of Muenster, 48149 Muenster, Germany.

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(A–D) Remating rate (number of females remating in 1 hr) at 24 or 48 hr following initial matings with either SP-transferring (SP+, bars with light shading) or SP-lacking (SP0, bars with dark shading) males. Simultaneously, the mating rate of age- and genotype-matched virgin females (bars with intermediate shading) was measured for comparison. (A and B) Remating in females hypomorphic for mir-279 and mir-317 in the w[Dah] or w[CS] genetic backgrounds, respectively. (C) Receptivity of mir-278 knockout females in the w[Dah] genetic background and (D) receptivity of mir-184 knockout females in the w1118 background. (E–H) Effect size (SP0 − SP+ treatment) and 95% CI for female remating rate for the different female genotypes mated first to a SP+ or SP0 male and provided with an opportunity to remate with a Dahomey wild-type male either 24 (diamonds with dark shading) or 48 hr (squares with light shading) after a first mating. Note that in the tests of the mir-184 knockout, (Figure 2H) all the control w1118 females remated; therefore, Cohen’s d could not be calculated. Hence only the effect size for mir-184 is shown.
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fig2: (A–D) Remating rate (number of females remating in 1 hr) at 24 or 48 hr following initial matings with either SP-transferring (SP+, bars with light shading) or SP-lacking (SP0, bars with dark shading) males. Simultaneously, the mating rate of age- and genotype-matched virgin females (bars with intermediate shading) was measured for comparison. (A and B) Remating in females hypomorphic for mir-279 and mir-317 in the w[Dah] or w[CS] genetic backgrounds, respectively. (C) Receptivity of mir-278 knockout females in the w[Dah] genetic background and (D) receptivity of mir-184 knockout females in the w1118 background. (E–H) Effect size (SP0 − SP+ treatment) and 95% CI for female remating rate for the different female genotypes mated first to a SP+ or SP0 male and provided with an opportunity to remate with a Dahomey wild-type male either 24 (diamonds with dark shading) or 48 hr (squares with light shading) after a first mating. Note that in the tests of the mir-184 knockout, (Figure 2H) all the control w1118 females remated; therefore, Cohen’s d could not be calculated. Hence only the effect size for mir-184 is shown.

Mentions: Virgin mutant and control females did not differ in their willingness to mate in their first mating (G22 = 1.67, P = 0.434) and this did not change over time (G21 = 2.84, P = 0.092; interaction = ns). There was a marginally nonsignificant difference in mating rate among the mated females (G22 = 5.33, P = 0.070) and the effect of time since the first mating on willingness to remate was similarly marginally nonsignificant (G21 = 3.15, P = 0.076). Receipt of SP significantly suppressed remating rate as expected (G21 = 84.26, P < 0.0001). There was a marginally nonsignificant interaction between female and male genotype (G22 = 5.68, P = 0.059, all other interactions = ns). This suggests that the effect of SP receipt on female sexual receptivity varied across the female genotypes tested. Across genotypes, females that received no SP remated at a rate similar to virgin females. However, SP was less efficient in suppressing remating in mir-317D females, whereas in mir-279D females, SP was equally effective in suppressing remating after 24 and 48 hr (Figure 2, A and E).


MicroRNAs influence reproductive responses by females to male sex peptide in Drosophila melanogaster.

Fricke C, Green D, Smith D, Dalmay T, Chapman T - Genetics (2014)

(A–D) Remating rate (number of females remating in 1 hr) at 24 or 48 hr following initial matings with either SP-transferring (SP+, bars with light shading) or SP-lacking (SP0, bars with dark shading) males. Simultaneously, the mating rate of age- and genotype-matched virgin females (bars with intermediate shading) was measured for comparison. (A and B) Remating in females hypomorphic for mir-279 and mir-317 in the w[Dah] or w[CS] genetic backgrounds, respectively. (C) Receptivity of mir-278 knockout females in the w[Dah] genetic background and (D) receptivity of mir-184 knockout females in the w1118 background. (E–H) Effect size (SP0 − SP+ treatment) and 95% CI for female remating rate for the different female genotypes mated first to a SP+ or SP0 male and provided with an opportunity to remate with a Dahomey wild-type male either 24 (diamonds with dark shading) or 48 hr (squares with light shading) after a first mating. Note that in the tests of the mir-184 knockout, (Figure 2H) all the control w1118 females remated; therefore, Cohen’s d could not be calculated. Hence only the effect size for mir-184 is shown.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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fig2: (A–D) Remating rate (number of females remating in 1 hr) at 24 or 48 hr following initial matings with either SP-transferring (SP+, bars with light shading) or SP-lacking (SP0, bars with dark shading) males. Simultaneously, the mating rate of age- and genotype-matched virgin females (bars with intermediate shading) was measured for comparison. (A and B) Remating in females hypomorphic for mir-279 and mir-317 in the w[Dah] or w[CS] genetic backgrounds, respectively. (C) Receptivity of mir-278 knockout females in the w[Dah] genetic background and (D) receptivity of mir-184 knockout females in the w1118 background. (E–H) Effect size (SP0 − SP+ treatment) and 95% CI for female remating rate for the different female genotypes mated first to a SP+ or SP0 male and provided with an opportunity to remate with a Dahomey wild-type male either 24 (diamonds with dark shading) or 48 hr (squares with light shading) after a first mating. Note that in the tests of the mir-184 knockout, (Figure 2H) all the control w1118 females remated; therefore, Cohen’s d could not be calculated. Hence only the effect size for mir-184 is shown.
Mentions: Virgin mutant and control females did not differ in their willingness to mate in their first mating (G22 = 1.67, P = 0.434) and this did not change over time (G21 = 2.84, P = 0.092; interaction = ns). There was a marginally nonsignificant difference in mating rate among the mated females (G22 = 5.33, P = 0.070) and the effect of time since the first mating on willingness to remate was similarly marginally nonsignificant (G21 = 3.15, P = 0.076). Receipt of SP significantly suppressed remating rate as expected (G21 = 84.26, P < 0.0001). There was a marginally nonsignificant interaction between female and male genotype (G22 = 5.68, P = 0.059, all other interactions = ns). This suggests that the effect of SP receipt on female sexual receptivity varied across the female genotypes tested. Across genotypes, females that received no SP remated at a rate similar to virgin females. However, SP was less efficient in suppressing remating in mir-317D females, whereas in mir-279D females, SP was equally effective in suppressing remating after 24 and 48 hr (Figure 2, A and E).

Bottom Line: However, these effects interacted significantly with the genetic background of the miRNA-lacking females.No significant survival effects were observed in miRNA-lacking females housed continually with SP or control males.The results provide the first insight into the effects and importance of miRNAs in regulating postmating responses in females.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, NR4 7TJ United Kingdom Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity, University of Muenster, 48149 Muenster, Germany.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus