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Effect of variety and processing method on functional properties of traditional sweet potato flour ("elubo") and sensory acceptability of cooked paste ("amala").

Fetuga G, Tomlins K, Henshaw F, Idowu M - Food Sci Nutr (2014)

Bottom Line: In order to overcome its high perishability and increase the utilization of sweet potato roots, three varieties of sweet potato roots were processed into flour using two methods.The interactive effect of variety and the processing method had a significant effect (P < 0.05) on all the functional properties of the flour except yellowness, setback viscosity, and peak time.Acceptable sweet potato "amala" with average sensory acceptability score of 7.5 were obtained from yellow-fleshed varieties irrespective of the processing method.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Food Science and Technology, Federal University of Agriculture Abeokuta, Nigeria.

ABSTRACT
"Amala" is a generic term in Nigeria, used to describe a thick paste prepared by stirring flour ("elubo") from yam, cassava or unripe plantain, in hot water, to form a smooth consistency. In order to overcome its high perishability and increase the utilization of sweet potato roots, three varieties of sweet potato roots were processed into flour using two methods. The interactive effect of variety and the processing method had a significant effect (P < 0.05) on all the functional properties of the flour except yellowness, setback viscosity, and peak time. Acceptable sweet potato "amala" with average sensory acceptability score of 7.5 were obtained from yellow-fleshed varieties irrespective of the processing method. Flour that produced acceptable "amala" were characterized by lower values of protein (2.20-3.94%), fiber (1.30-1.65%), total sugar (12.41-38.83 μg/mg), water absorption capacity (168-215 g/100 g), water solubility (8.29-14.65%), swelling power (0.52-0.82 g/g), and higher peak time (6.9-8.7 min).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Consumer acceptability of sweet potato “amala” as influenced by variety and the processing method. UYF, Ugandan yellow-fleshed; AOF, American orange-fleshed; NYF, Nigerian yellow-fleshed.
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fig01: Consumer acceptability of sweet potato “amala” as influenced by variety and the processing method. UYF, Ugandan yellow-fleshed; AOF, American orange-fleshed; NYF, Nigerian yellow-fleshed.

Mentions: Sensory scores for consumer acceptability of sweet potato “amala” are shown in Figure1. “Amala” from yellow-fleshed varieties were scored high (7.3–7.7) while those from the orange-fleshed variety were scored very low (3.3–3.8). Among the “amala” with high sensory scores, those prepared from sweet potato flour using the parboiling method were scored higher; Ugandan yellow-fleshed (7.7) and Nigerian yellow-fleshed (7.3). Acceptbility of “amala” was significantly correlated (P < 0.01) with ash,b* and WS (r ranged from −0.92 to −0.96), as well as with fiber, sugars, and peak time (r ranged from −0.83 to −0.91) (P < 0.05) of sweet potato “elubo”.


Effect of variety and processing method on functional properties of traditional sweet potato flour ("elubo") and sensory acceptability of cooked paste ("amala").

Fetuga G, Tomlins K, Henshaw F, Idowu M - Food Sci Nutr (2014)

Consumer acceptability of sweet potato “amala” as influenced by variety and the processing method. UYF, Ugandan yellow-fleshed; AOF, American orange-fleshed; NYF, Nigerian yellow-fleshed.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4256573&req=5

fig01: Consumer acceptability of sweet potato “amala” as influenced by variety and the processing method. UYF, Ugandan yellow-fleshed; AOF, American orange-fleshed; NYF, Nigerian yellow-fleshed.
Mentions: Sensory scores for consumer acceptability of sweet potato “amala” are shown in Figure1. “Amala” from yellow-fleshed varieties were scored high (7.3–7.7) while those from the orange-fleshed variety were scored very low (3.3–3.8). Among the “amala” with high sensory scores, those prepared from sweet potato flour using the parboiling method were scored higher; Ugandan yellow-fleshed (7.7) and Nigerian yellow-fleshed (7.3). Acceptbility of “amala” was significantly correlated (P < 0.01) with ash,b* and WS (r ranged from −0.92 to −0.96), as well as with fiber, sugars, and peak time (r ranged from −0.83 to −0.91) (P < 0.05) of sweet potato “elubo”.

Bottom Line: In order to overcome its high perishability and increase the utilization of sweet potato roots, three varieties of sweet potato roots were processed into flour using two methods.The interactive effect of variety and the processing method had a significant effect (P < 0.05) on all the functional properties of the flour except yellowness, setback viscosity, and peak time.Acceptable sweet potato "amala" with average sensory acceptability score of 7.5 were obtained from yellow-fleshed varieties irrespective of the processing method.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Food Science and Technology, Federal University of Agriculture Abeokuta, Nigeria.

ABSTRACT
"Amala" is a generic term in Nigeria, used to describe a thick paste prepared by stirring flour ("elubo") from yam, cassava or unripe plantain, in hot water, to form a smooth consistency. In order to overcome its high perishability and increase the utilization of sweet potato roots, three varieties of sweet potato roots were processed into flour using two methods. The interactive effect of variety and the processing method had a significant effect (P < 0.05) on all the functional properties of the flour except yellowness, setback viscosity, and peak time. Acceptable sweet potato "amala" with average sensory acceptability score of 7.5 were obtained from yellow-fleshed varieties irrespective of the processing method. Flour that produced acceptable "amala" were characterized by lower values of protein (2.20-3.94%), fiber (1.30-1.65%), total sugar (12.41-38.83 μg/mg), water absorption capacity (168-215 g/100 g), water solubility (8.29-14.65%), swelling power (0.52-0.82 g/g), and higher peak time (6.9-8.7 min).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus