Limits...
Decrease of free radical concentrations in humans following consumption of a high antioxidant capacity natural product.

Nemzer B, Chang T, Xie Z, Pietrzkowski Z, Reyes T, Ou B - Food Sci Nutr (2014)

Bottom Line: Dihydrorhodamine-6G (DHR6G) is indiscriminate to the various free radicals found in humans, and therefore can be useful in quantifying total ROS in vivo.This method is both reliable and efficient for evaluating the efficacy of antioxidants against ROS in vivo.Our data indicate that eleven participants responded to the intake of Spectra™ by significant decreases of ROS concentrations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: VDF FutureCeuticals 2692 N State Rt. 1-17, Momence, Illinois, 60954 ; University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 1201 W. Gregory Dr, Urbana, Illinois, 61801.

ABSTRACT
ORAC and other in vitro methods have to date proved useful in measuring antioxidant potential in foods. In order to better understand the potential relationship between diet and free radical production/mitigation, an in vivo analytic method can provide new insight into directly measuring reactive oxidant species (ROS). Dihydrorhodamine-6G (DHR6G) is indiscriminate to the various free radicals found in humans, and therefore can be useful in quantifying total ROS in vivo. Our aim was to investigate whether the total ROS in human subjects can be quantified using DHR6G after intake of a blend of antioxidants-rich fruit and vegetable-based materials. Twelve participants were given 100 mg of a proprietary blend of fruit, vegetable, and herb powders and concentrates commercially marketed under the trade name "Spectra™". Blood samples were collected at 0, 60, 120 and 180 min and were subsequently tested for ROS in serum using DHR6G as a fluorescent probe. By quantifying this fluorescence, we were able to measure ROS concentrations in human blood. This method is both reliable and efficient for evaluating the efficacy of antioxidants against ROS in vivo. Our data indicate that eleven participants responded to the intake of Spectra™ by significant decreases of ROS concentrations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The change of serum-free radical concentrations in placebo and treatment groups at (A) 60, (B) 120, and (C) 180 min.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4256568&req=5

fig05: The change of serum-free radical concentrations in placebo and treatment groups at (A) 60, (B) 120, and (C) 180 min.

Mentions: The efficacy of Spectra™ is demonstrated in Figures5, 6. Figure5 shows that in the placebo group, for most participants, free radical concentrations in serum were not decreased, while in the Spectra™ group, as shown in Figure6, there was a significant decrease in serum-free radical concentrations across the entire group within three hours of consumption of 100 mg of Spectra™.


Decrease of free radical concentrations in humans following consumption of a high antioxidant capacity natural product.

Nemzer B, Chang T, Xie Z, Pietrzkowski Z, Reyes T, Ou B - Food Sci Nutr (2014)

The change of serum-free radical concentrations in placebo and treatment groups at (A) 60, (B) 120, and (C) 180 min.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4256568&req=5

fig05: The change of serum-free radical concentrations in placebo and treatment groups at (A) 60, (B) 120, and (C) 180 min.
Mentions: The efficacy of Spectra™ is demonstrated in Figures5, 6. Figure5 shows that in the placebo group, for most participants, free radical concentrations in serum were not decreased, while in the Spectra™ group, as shown in Figure6, there was a significant decrease in serum-free radical concentrations across the entire group within three hours of consumption of 100 mg of Spectra™.

Bottom Line: Dihydrorhodamine-6G (DHR6G) is indiscriminate to the various free radicals found in humans, and therefore can be useful in quantifying total ROS in vivo.This method is both reliable and efficient for evaluating the efficacy of antioxidants against ROS in vivo.Our data indicate that eleven participants responded to the intake of Spectra™ by significant decreases of ROS concentrations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: VDF FutureCeuticals 2692 N State Rt. 1-17, Momence, Illinois, 60954 ; University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 1201 W. Gregory Dr, Urbana, Illinois, 61801.

ABSTRACT
ORAC and other in vitro methods have to date proved useful in measuring antioxidant potential in foods. In order to better understand the potential relationship between diet and free radical production/mitigation, an in vivo analytic method can provide new insight into directly measuring reactive oxidant species (ROS). Dihydrorhodamine-6G (DHR6G) is indiscriminate to the various free radicals found in humans, and therefore can be useful in quantifying total ROS in vivo. Our aim was to investigate whether the total ROS in human subjects can be quantified using DHR6G after intake of a blend of antioxidants-rich fruit and vegetable-based materials. Twelve participants were given 100 mg of a proprietary blend of fruit, vegetable, and herb powders and concentrates commercially marketed under the trade name "Spectra™". Blood samples were collected at 0, 60, 120 and 180 min and were subsequently tested for ROS in serum using DHR6G as a fluorescent probe. By quantifying this fluorescence, we were able to measure ROS concentrations in human blood. This method is both reliable and efficient for evaluating the efficacy of antioxidants against ROS in vivo. Our data indicate that eleven participants responded to the intake of Spectra™ by significant decreases of ROS concentrations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus