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Behavioural asymmetries on the greyscales task: The influence of native reading direction.

Friedrich TE, Elias LJ - Cult Brain (2014)

Bottom Line: Reliable leftward attentional and perceptual biases demonstrated in a variety of visuospatial tasks have been found to deviate from the left in research examining the influence of scanning habits.The aim of the current research was to examine the influence of native script direction on pseudoneglect during the greyscales task in a representative sample of native right-to-left readers.Fifty-four native left-to-right readers and 43 right-to-left readers completed the greyscales task, which required judging the darker of two left-right mirrored brightness gradients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Saskatchewan, 9 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A5 Canada.

ABSTRACT

Reliable leftward attentional and perceptual biases demonstrated in a variety of visuospatial tasks have been found to deviate from the left in research examining the influence of scanning habits. The aim of the current research was to examine the influence of native script direction on pseudoneglect during the greyscales task in a representative sample of native right-to-left readers. Fifty-four native left-to-right readers and 43 right-to-left readers completed the greyscales task, which required judging the darker of two left-right mirrored brightness gradients. Native left-to-right readers demonstrated a left response bias on the greyscales task, whereas right-to-left readers failed to demonstrate a bias, however, both groups responded more quickly when making leftward choices. The research suggests that the strength of attentional biases are influenced by behavioural biases, such as scanning habits, and neural and anatomical asymmetries in the right parietal and frontal cortices. Thus, to improve the clinical utility of the greyscales task for diagnosing neglect, right-to-left readers should be examined to fully understand the normal range of biases displayed by neurologically healthy individuals.

No MeSH data available.


The mean response bias for the greyscales task demonstrated by native left-to-right (LtoR) and native right-to-left (RtoL) readers. A negative score indicates a preference for the darkest edge of the equiluminant gradient stimulus pair to be located on the left. Error bars represent standard error of the mean
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Fig2: The mean response bias for the greyscales task demonstrated by native left-to-right (LtoR) and native right-to-left (RtoL) readers. A negative score indicates a preference for the darkest edge of the equiluminant gradient stimulus pair to be located on the left. Error bars represent standard error of the mean

Mentions: The response bias was analyzed with a 2 (Reading direction [left-to-right, right-to-left]) × 2 (Sex [male, female]) repeated-measures ANOVA. There was a significant effect for reading direction, F(1, 93) = 8.489, p = .004, ηρ2 = .0894, but no significant effect of sex F(1, 93) = .026, p = .872, ηρ2 = .0003, and no interaction between the two factors, F(1, 93) = .049, p = .825, ηρ2 = .0005. The native left-to-right readers demonstrated a larger response bias (M = −34.6, SD = 37.67) compared to the right-to-left readers (M = −.99, SD = 42.06) (Fig. 2). One-sample t tests, compared to the test-value of zero, were conducted to evaluate whether a significant side bias was observed; left-to-right readers demonstrated a leftward response bias, t(53) = −5.097, p < .001, 95 % CI −48.28, −21.46, whereas right-to-left readers failed to demonstrate a significant bias t(42) = −.109, p = .914, 95 % CI −19.50, 17.45.Fig. 2


Behavioural asymmetries on the greyscales task: The influence of native reading direction.

Friedrich TE, Elias LJ - Cult Brain (2014)

The mean response bias for the greyscales task demonstrated by native left-to-right (LtoR) and native right-to-left (RtoL) readers. A negative score indicates a preference for the darkest edge of the equiluminant gradient stimulus pair to be located on the left. Error bars represent standard error of the mean
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4256519&req=5

Fig2: The mean response bias for the greyscales task demonstrated by native left-to-right (LtoR) and native right-to-left (RtoL) readers. A negative score indicates a preference for the darkest edge of the equiluminant gradient stimulus pair to be located on the left. Error bars represent standard error of the mean
Mentions: The response bias was analyzed with a 2 (Reading direction [left-to-right, right-to-left]) × 2 (Sex [male, female]) repeated-measures ANOVA. There was a significant effect for reading direction, F(1, 93) = 8.489, p = .004, ηρ2 = .0894, but no significant effect of sex F(1, 93) = .026, p = .872, ηρ2 = .0003, and no interaction between the two factors, F(1, 93) = .049, p = .825, ηρ2 = .0005. The native left-to-right readers demonstrated a larger response bias (M = −34.6, SD = 37.67) compared to the right-to-left readers (M = −.99, SD = 42.06) (Fig. 2). One-sample t tests, compared to the test-value of zero, were conducted to evaluate whether a significant side bias was observed; left-to-right readers demonstrated a leftward response bias, t(53) = −5.097, p < .001, 95 % CI −48.28, −21.46, whereas right-to-left readers failed to demonstrate a significant bias t(42) = −.109, p = .914, 95 % CI −19.50, 17.45.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Reliable leftward attentional and perceptual biases demonstrated in a variety of visuospatial tasks have been found to deviate from the left in research examining the influence of scanning habits.The aim of the current research was to examine the influence of native script direction on pseudoneglect during the greyscales task in a representative sample of native right-to-left readers.Fifty-four native left-to-right readers and 43 right-to-left readers completed the greyscales task, which required judging the darker of two left-right mirrored brightness gradients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Saskatchewan, 9 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A5 Canada.

ABSTRACT

Reliable leftward attentional and perceptual biases demonstrated in a variety of visuospatial tasks have been found to deviate from the left in research examining the influence of scanning habits. The aim of the current research was to examine the influence of native script direction on pseudoneglect during the greyscales task in a representative sample of native right-to-left readers. Fifty-four native left-to-right readers and 43 right-to-left readers completed the greyscales task, which required judging the darker of two left-right mirrored brightness gradients. Native left-to-right readers demonstrated a left response bias on the greyscales task, whereas right-to-left readers failed to demonstrate a bias, however, both groups responded more quickly when making leftward choices. The research suggests that the strength of attentional biases are influenced by behavioural biases, such as scanning habits, and neural and anatomical asymmetries in the right parietal and frontal cortices. Thus, to improve the clinical utility of the greyscales task for diagnosing neglect, right-to-left readers should be examined to fully understand the normal range of biases displayed by neurologically healthy individuals.

No MeSH data available.