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Reducing Campylobacter jejuni colonization of poultry via vaccination.

Neal-McKinney JM, Samuelson DR, Eucker TP, Nissen MS, Crespo R, Konkel ME - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Seven days following challenge, chickens were necropsied and cecal contents were serially diluted and plated to determine the number of C. jejuni per gram of material.The sera from the chickens were also analyzed to determine the concentration and specificity of antibodies reactive against the C. jejuni SECPs.Vaccination of chickens with the CadF, FlaA, and FlpA peptides resulted in a reduction in the number of C. jejuni in the ceca compared to the non-vaccinated C. jejuni-challenged group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Molecular Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Campylobacter jejuni is a leading bacterial cause of human gastrointestinal disease worldwide. While C. jejuni is a commensal organism in chickens, case-studies have demonstrated a link between infection with C. jejuni and the consumption of foods that have been cross-contaminated with raw or undercooked poultry. We hypothesized that vaccination of chickens with C. jejuni surface-exposed colonization proteins (SECPs) would reduce the ability of C. jejuni to colonize chickens, thereby reducing the contamination of poultry products at the retail level and potentially providing a safer food product for consumers. To test our hypothesis, we injected chickens with recombinant C. jejuni peptides from CadF, FlaA, FlpA, CmeC, and a CadF-FlaA-FlpA fusion protein. Seven days following challenge, chickens were necropsied and cecal contents were serially diluted and plated to determine the number of C. jejuni per gram of material. The sera from the chickens were also analyzed to determine the concentration and specificity of antibodies reactive against the C. jejuni SECPs. Vaccination of chickens with the CadF, FlaA, and FlpA peptides resulted in a reduction in the number of C. jejuni in the ceca compared to the non-vaccinated C. jejuni-challenged group. The greatest reduction in C. jejuni colonization was observed in chickens injected with the FlaA, FlpA, or CadF-FlaA-FlpA fusion proteins. Vaccination of chickens with different SECPs resulted in the production of C. jejuni-specific IgY antibodies. In summary, we show that the vaccination of poultry with individual C. jejuni SECPs or a combination of SECPs provides protection of chickens from C. jejuni colonization.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Experimental design of chicken vaccination experiment.The first peptide injections were given at a dose of 240 µg (GST-CadF, GST-FlaA, GST-FlpA, GST-CmeC, and the CadF-FlaA-FlpA GST-trifecta groups) and the booster injections were given at a dose of 240 µg (CadF-His, FlpA-His, GST-FlaA, GST-CmeC, and CadF-FlaA-FlpA GST-trifecta). Groups 1 and 2 were not injected with a C. jejuni SECP (NI = no injection). Each chicken within Groups 2 through 7 received a dose of 2×108 CFU of C. jejuni at day 20. The chickens were necropsied at 27 days of age.
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pone-0114254-g003: Experimental design of chicken vaccination experiment.The first peptide injections were given at a dose of 240 µg (GST-CadF, GST-FlaA, GST-FlpA, GST-CmeC, and the CadF-FlaA-FlpA GST-trifecta groups) and the booster injections were given at a dose of 240 µg (CadF-His, FlpA-His, GST-FlaA, GST-CmeC, and CadF-FlaA-FlpA GST-trifecta). Groups 1 and 2 were not injected with a C. jejuni SECP (NI = no injection). Each chicken within Groups 2 through 7 received a dose of 2×108 CFU of C. jejuni at day 20. The chickens were necropsied at 27 days of age.

Mentions: The experimental design of the chicken vaccination experiment is shown in Figure 3. One-day-old chicks were divided into seven groups and placed in isolator chambers. At six days of age, the chicks were injected with 240 µg of the GST-tagged 90 mer peptides GST-CadF, GST-FlaA, GST-FlpA, GST-CmeC, and GST-trifecta. The booster injection given on day 16 consisted of 240 µg of full-length CadF-His, FlaA-His, FlpA-His, and CmeC-His, or 240 µg of a mixture of 80 µg each of CadF-His, FlaA-His, and FlpA-His. Two groups of non-injected birds were included as controls; one group was not challenged while the other was challenged with C. jejuni. At 20 days of age, the chicks were orally challenged with 2×108 CFU of C. jejuni F38011 wild-type strain. One week later (day 27) the chicks were necropsied and ceca and blood collected for analysis.


Reducing Campylobacter jejuni colonization of poultry via vaccination.

Neal-McKinney JM, Samuelson DR, Eucker TP, Nissen MS, Crespo R, Konkel ME - PLoS ONE (2014)

Experimental design of chicken vaccination experiment.The first peptide injections were given at a dose of 240 µg (GST-CadF, GST-FlaA, GST-FlpA, GST-CmeC, and the CadF-FlaA-FlpA GST-trifecta groups) and the booster injections were given at a dose of 240 µg (CadF-His, FlpA-His, GST-FlaA, GST-CmeC, and CadF-FlaA-FlpA GST-trifecta). Groups 1 and 2 were not injected with a C. jejuni SECP (NI = no injection). Each chicken within Groups 2 through 7 received a dose of 2×108 CFU of C. jejuni at day 20. The chickens were necropsied at 27 days of age.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4256221&req=5

pone-0114254-g003: Experimental design of chicken vaccination experiment.The first peptide injections were given at a dose of 240 µg (GST-CadF, GST-FlaA, GST-FlpA, GST-CmeC, and the CadF-FlaA-FlpA GST-trifecta groups) and the booster injections were given at a dose of 240 µg (CadF-His, FlpA-His, GST-FlaA, GST-CmeC, and CadF-FlaA-FlpA GST-trifecta). Groups 1 and 2 were not injected with a C. jejuni SECP (NI = no injection). Each chicken within Groups 2 through 7 received a dose of 2×108 CFU of C. jejuni at day 20. The chickens were necropsied at 27 days of age.
Mentions: The experimental design of the chicken vaccination experiment is shown in Figure 3. One-day-old chicks were divided into seven groups and placed in isolator chambers. At six days of age, the chicks were injected with 240 µg of the GST-tagged 90 mer peptides GST-CadF, GST-FlaA, GST-FlpA, GST-CmeC, and GST-trifecta. The booster injection given on day 16 consisted of 240 µg of full-length CadF-His, FlaA-His, FlpA-His, and CmeC-His, or 240 µg of a mixture of 80 µg each of CadF-His, FlaA-His, and FlpA-His. Two groups of non-injected birds were included as controls; one group was not challenged while the other was challenged with C. jejuni. At 20 days of age, the chicks were orally challenged with 2×108 CFU of C. jejuni F38011 wild-type strain. One week later (day 27) the chicks were necropsied and ceca and blood collected for analysis.

Bottom Line: Seven days following challenge, chickens were necropsied and cecal contents were serially diluted and plated to determine the number of C. jejuni per gram of material.The sera from the chickens were also analyzed to determine the concentration and specificity of antibodies reactive against the C. jejuni SECPs.Vaccination of chickens with the CadF, FlaA, and FlpA peptides resulted in a reduction in the number of C. jejuni in the ceca compared to the non-vaccinated C. jejuni-challenged group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Molecular Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Campylobacter jejuni is a leading bacterial cause of human gastrointestinal disease worldwide. While C. jejuni is a commensal organism in chickens, case-studies have demonstrated a link between infection with C. jejuni and the consumption of foods that have been cross-contaminated with raw or undercooked poultry. We hypothesized that vaccination of chickens with C. jejuni surface-exposed colonization proteins (SECPs) would reduce the ability of C. jejuni to colonize chickens, thereby reducing the contamination of poultry products at the retail level and potentially providing a safer food product for consumers. To test our hypothesis, we injected chickens with recombinant C. jejuni peptides from CadF, FlaA, FlpA, CmeC, and a CadF-FlaA-FlpA fusion protein. Seven days following challenge, chickens were necropsied and cecal contents were serially diluted and plated to determine the number of C. jejuni per gram of material. The sera from the chickens were also analyzed to determine the concentration and specificity of antibodies reactive against the C. jejuni SECPs. Vaccination of chickens with the CadF, FlaA, and FlpA peptides resulted in a reduction in the number of C. jejuni in the ceca compared to the non-vaccinated C. jejuni-challenged group. The greatest reduction in C. jejuni colonization was observed in chickens injected with the FlaA, FlpA, or CadF-FlaA-FlpA fusion proteins. Vaccination of chickens with different SECPs resulted in the production of C. jejuni-specific IgY antibodies. In summary, we show that the vaccination of poultry with individual C. jejuni SECPs or a combination of SECPs provides protection of chickens from C. jejuni colonization.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus