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Low rates of antimicrobial-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in wildlife in Taï National Park, Côte d'Ivoire, surrounded by villages with high prevalence of multiresistant ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in people and domestic animals.

Albrechtova K, Papousek I, De Nys H, Pauly M, Anoh E, Mossoun A, Dolejska M, Masarikova M, Metzger S, Couacy-Hymann E, Akoua-Koffi C, Wittig RM, Klimes J, Cizek A, Leendertz FH, Literak I - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Antimicrobial resistance genes can be found in all ecosystems, including those where antibiotic selective pressure has never been exerted.In TNP, different variants of qnrB were detected in Citrobacter freundii isolates originating non-human primates and mice.In conclusion, ESBL and PMQR genes frequently found in humans and domestic animals in the villages were rather exceptional in wildlife living in the protected area.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology and Wildlife Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Hygiene and Ecology, University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Brno, Czech Republic.

ABSTRACT
Antimicrobial resistance genes can be found in all ecosystems, including those where antibiotic selective pressure has never been exerted. We investigated resistance genes in a collection of faecal samples of wildlife (non-human primates, mice), people and domestic animals (dogs, cats) in Côte d'Ivoire; in the chimpanzee research area of Taï National Park (TNP) and adjacent villages. Single bacteria isolates were collected from antibiotic-containing agar plates and subjected to molecular analysis to detect Enterobacteriaceae isolates with plasmid-mediated genes of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR). While the prevalence of ESBL-producing E. coli in the villages was 27% in people (n = 77) and 32% in dogs (n = 38), no ESBL-producer was found in wildlife of TNP (n = 75). PMQR genes, mainly represented by qnrS1, were also present in human- and dog-originating isolates from the villages (36% and 42% in people and dogs, respectively), but no qnrS has been found in the park. In TNP, different variants of qnrB were detected in Citrobacter freundii isolates originating non-human primates and mice. In conclusion, ESBL and PMQR genes frequently found in humans and domestic animals in the villages were rather exceptional in wildlife living in the protected area. Although people enter the park, the strict biosecurity levels they are obliged to follow probably impede transmission of bacteria between them and wildlife.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Dendrogram of resistant E. coli isolates’ PFGE profiles.Generated by cluster analysis of the Dice similarity indices in the BioNumerics fingerprinting software (optimization 1%, band matching tolerance 1%, tolerance change 1%). Isolates marked with “cip” were obtained by cultivation on ciprofloxacin and harbored PMQR genes, isolates with “ctx” represent the CTX-M-15 producing E. coli. “H” isolate from human, “D” isolate from dog, “C” isolate from cat.
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pone-0113548-g001: Dendrogram of resistant E. coli isolates’ PFGE profiles.Generated by cluster analysis of the Dice similarity indices in the BioNumerics fingerprinting software (optimization 1%, band matching tolerance 1%, tolerance change 1%). Isolates marked with “cip” were obtained by cultivation on ciprofloxacin and harbored PMQR genes, isolates with “ctx” represent the CTX-M-15 producing E. coli. “H” isolate from human, “D” isolate from dog, “C” isolate from cat.

Mentions: According to the PFGE analysis, the ESBL- and PMQR- resistant isolates grouped into 15 clusters of >80% similarity irrespective of their host (dogs versus humans) and sampling site (village). No clone seemed to be characteristic of a given locality. Isolates with identical PFGE profile were detected in humans and animals living in the same villages (Figure 1).


Low rates of antimicrobial-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in wildlife in Taï National Park, Côte d'Ivoire, surrounded by villages with high prevalence of multiresistant ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in people and domestic animals.

Albrechtova K, Papousek I, De Nys H, Pauly M, Anoh E, Mossoun A, Dolejska M, Masarikova M, Metzger S, Couacy-Hymann E, Akoua-Koffi C, Wittig RM, Klimes J, Cizek A, Leendertz FH, Literak I - PLoS ONE (2014)

Dendrogram of resistant E. coli isolates’ PFGE profiles.Generated by cluster analysis of the Dice similarity indices in the BioNumerics fingerprinting software (optimization 1%, band matching tolerance 1%, tolerance change 1%). Isolates marked with “cip” were obtained by cultivation on ciprofloxacin and harbored PMQR genes, isolates with “ctx” represent the CTX-M-15 producing E. coli. “H” isolate from human, “D” isolate from dog, “C” isolate from cat.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4256204&req=5

pone-0113548-g001: Dendrogram of resistant E. coli isolates’ PFGE profiles.Generated by cluster analysis of the Dice similarity indices in the BioNumerics fingerprinting software (optimization 1%, band matching tolerance 1%, tolerance change 1%). Isolates marked with “cip” were obtained by cultivation on ciprofloxacin and harbored PMQR genes, isolates with “ctx” represent the CTX-M-15 producing E. coli. “H” isolate from human, “D” isolate from dog, “C” isolate from cat.
Mentions: According to the PFGE analysis, the ESBL- and PMQR- resistant isolates grouped into 15 clusters of >80% similarity irrespective of their host (dogs versus humans) and sampling site (village). No clone seemed to be characteristic of a given locality. Isolates with identical PFGE profile were detected in humans and animals living in the same villages (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Antimicrobial resistance genes can be found in all ecosystems, including those where antibiotic selective pressure has never been exerted.In TNP, different variants of qnrB were detected in Citrobacter freundii isolates originating non-human primates and mice.In conclusion, ESBL and PMQR genes frequently found in humans and domestic animals in the villages were rather exceptional in wildlife living in the protected area.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology and Wildlife Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Hygiene and Ecology, University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Brno, Czech Republic.

ABSTRACT
Antimicrobial resistance genes can be found in all ecosystems, including those where antibiotic selective pressure has never been exerted. We investigated resistance genes in a collection of faecal samples of wildlife (non-human primates, mice), people and domestic animals (dogs, cats) in Côte d'Ivoire; in the chimpanzee research area of Taï National Park (TNP) and adjacent villages. Single bacteria isolates were collected from antibiotic-containing agar plates and subjected to molecular analysis to detect Enterobacteriaceae isolates with plasmid-mediated genes of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR). While the prevalence of ESBL-producing E. coli in the villages was 27% in people (n = 77) and 32% in dogs (n = 38), no ESBL-producer was found in wildlife of TNP (n = 75). PMQR genes, mainly represented by qnrS1, were also present in human- and dog-originating isolates from the villages (36% and 42% in people and dogs, respectively), but no qnrS has been found in the park. In TNP, different variants of qnrB were detected in Citrobacter freundii isolates originating non-human primates and mice. In conclusion, ESBL and PMQR genes frequently found in humans and domestic animals in the villages were rather exceptional in wildlife living in the protected area. Although people enter the park, the strict biosecurity levels they are obliged to follow probably impede transmission of bacteria between them and wildlife.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus