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Analysis of the Phlebiopsis gigantea genome, transcriptome and secretome provides insight into its pioneer colonization strategies of wood.

Hori C, Ishida T, Igarashi K, Samejima M, Suzuki H, Master E, Ferreira P, Ruiz-Dueñas FJ, Held B, Canessa P, Larrondo LF, Schmoll M, Druzhinina IS, Kubicek CP, Gaskell JA, Kersten P, St John F, Glasner J, Sabat G, Splinter BonDurant S, Syed K, Yadav J, Mgbeahuruike AC, Kovalchuk A, Asiegbu FO, Lackner G, Hoffmeister D, Rencoret J, Gutiérrez A, Sun H, Lindquist E, Barry K, Riley R, Grigoriev IV, Henrissat B, Kües U, Berka RM, Martínez AT, Covert SF, Blanchette RA, Cullen D - PLoS Genet. (2014)

Bottom Line: Their products included an ABC transporter, lipases, cytochrome P450s, glutathione S-transferase and aldehyde dehydrogenase.Other regulated genes of unknown function and several constitutively expressed genes are also likely involved in P. gigantea's extractives metabolism.These results contribute to our fundamental understanding of pioneer colonization of conifer wood and provide insight into the diverse chemistries employed by fungi in carbon cycling processes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomaterials Sciences, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Collectively classified as white-rot fungi, certain basidiomycetes efficiently degrade the major structural polymers of wood cell walls. A small subset of these Agaricomycetes, exemplified by Phlebiopsis gigantea, is capable of colonizing freshly exposed conifer sapwood despite its high content of extractives, which retards the establishment of other fungal species. The mechanism(s) by which P. gigantea tolerates and metabolizes resinous compounds have not been explored. Here, we report the annotated P. gigantea genome and compare profiles of its transcriptome and secretome when cultured on fresh-cut versus solvent-extracted loblolly pine wood. The P. gigantea genome contains a conventional repertoire of hydrolase genes involved in cellulose/hemicellulose degradation, whose patterns of expression were relatively unperturbed by the absence of extractives. The expression of genes typically ascribed to lignin degradation was also largely unaffected. In contrast, genes likely involved in the transformation and detoxification of wood extractives were highly induced in its presence. Their products included an ABC transporter, lipases, cytochrome P450s, glutathione S-transferase and aldehyde dehydrogenase. Other regulated genes of unknown function and several constitutively expressed genes are also likely involved in P. gigantea's extractives metabolism. These results contribute to our fundamental understanding of pioneer colonization of conifer wood and provide insight into the diverse chemistries employed by fungi in carbon cycling processes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Wood decay characteristics.Comparative weight loss of parental strain 11061 and single basidiospore derivatives on colonized loblolly pine wood (Pinus taeda) wood wafers were determined after 4, 8 and 12 weeks incubation (bottom left panel) as described in Methods. Single basidiospore strain 5–6 also aggressively decayed birch and spruce (Text S1) and was selected for sequencing. Upper panels show scanning electron microscopy [68] of radial (left) and transverse (right) sections of pine wood tracheids that were substantially eroded or completely degraded by P. gigantea strain 5–6 by week twelve. Transverse section of sound wood (bottom photo) provides comparison. (Bar  = 40 µm).
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pgen-1004759-g002: Wood decay characteristics.Comparative weight loss of parental strain 11061 and single basidiospore derivatives on colonized loblolly pine wood (Pinus taeda) wood wafers were determined after 4, 8 and 12 weeks incubation (bottom left panel) as described in Methods. Single basidiospore strain 5–6 also aggressively decayed birch and spruce (Text S1) and was selected for sequencing. Upper panels show scanning electron microscopy [68] of radial (left) and transverse (right) sections of pine wood tracheids that were substantially eroded or completely degraded by P. gigantea strain 5–6 by week twelve. Transverse section of sound wood (bottom photo) provides comparison. (Bar  = 40 µm).

Mentions: Following an assessment of wood decay properties (Figure 2), P. gigantea single basidiospore strain 5–6 was selected for sequencing using Illumina reads assembled with AllPathsLG. Genome size was estimated to be approximately 30 Mbp (Text S1), somewhat lower than closely related members of the ‘Phlebia clade’ [23], [37] such as C. subvermispora (39 Mbp) and P. chrysosporium (35 Mbp) [22], [27]. Aided by 17,915 mapped EST clusters, the JGI annotation pipeline predicted 11,891 genes. Proteins were assigned to 6412, 5615, 6932 and 2253 KOG categories, GO terms, pfam domains and EC numbers, respectively. Significant synteny with P. chrysosporium was observed (Figure S1). Detailed information on the assembly and annotations is available via the JGI portal MycoCosm [38].


Analysis of the Phlebiopsis gigantea genome, transcriptome and secretome provides insight into its pioneer colonization strategies of wood.

Hori C, Ishida T, Igarashi K, Samejima M, Suzuki H, Master E, Ferreira P, Ruiz-Dueñas FJ, Held B, Canessa P, Larrondo LF, Schmoll M, Druzhinina IS, Kubicek CP, Gaskell JA, Kersten P, St John F, Glasner J, Sabat G, Splinter BonDurant S, Syed K, Yadav J, Mgbeahuruike AC, Kovalchuk A, Asiegbu FO, Lackner G, Hoffmeister D, Rencoret J, Gutiérrez A, Sun H, Lindquist E, Barry K, Riley R, Grigoriev IV, Henrissat B, Kües U, Berka RM, Martínez AT, Covert SF, Blanchette RA, Cullen D - PLoS Genet. (2014)

Wood decay characteristics.Comparative weight loss of parental strain 11061 and single basidiospore derivatives on colonized loblolly pine wood (Pinus taeda) wood wafers were determined after 4, 8 and 12 weeks incubation (bottom left panel) as described in Methods. Single basidiospore strain 5–6 also aggressively decayed birch and spruce (Text S1) and was selected for sequencing. Upper panels show scanning electron microscopy [68] of radial (left) and transverse (right) sections of pine wood tracheids that were substantially eroded or completely degraded by P. gigantea strain 5–6 by week twelve. Transverse section of sound wood (bottom photo) provides comparison. (Bar  = 40 µm).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4256170&req=5

pgen-1004759-g002: Wood decay characteristics.Comparative weight loss of parental strain 11061 and single basidiospore derivatives on colonized loblolly pine wood (Pinus taeda) wood wafers were determined after 4, 8 and 12 weeks incubation (bottom left panel) as described in Methods. Single basidiospore strain 5–6 also aggressively decayed birch and spruce (Text S1) and was selected for sequencing. Upper panels show scanning electron microscopy [68] of radial (left) and transverse (right) sections of pine wood tracheids that were substantially eroded or completely degraded by P. gigantea strain 5–6 by week twelve. Transverse section of sound wood (bottom photo) provides comparison. (Bar  = 40 µm).
Mentions: Following an assessment of wood decay properties (Figure 2), P. gigantea single basidiospore strain 5–6 was selected for sequencing using Illumina reads assembled with AllPathsLG. Genome size was estimated to be approximately 30 Mbp (Text S1), somewhat lower than closely related members of the ‘Phlebia clade’ [23], [37] such as C. subvermispora (39 Mbp) and P. chrysosporium (35 Mbp) [22], [27]. Aided by 17,915 mapped EST clusters, the JGI annotation pipeline predicted 11,891 genes. Proteins were assigned to 6412, 5615, 6932 and 2253 KOG categories, GO terms, pfam domains and EC numbers, respectively. Significant synteny with P. chrysosporium was observed (Figure S1). Detailed information on the assembly and annotations is available via the JGI portal MycoCosm [38].

Bottom Line: Their products included an ABC transporter, lipases, cytochrome P450s, glutathione S-transferase and aldehyde dehydrogenase.Other regulated genes of unknown function and several constitutively expressed genes are also likely involved in P. gigantea's extractives metabolism.These results contribute to our fundamental understanding of pioneer colonization of conifer wood and provide insight into the diverse chemistries employed by fungi in carbon cycling processes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomaterials Sciences, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Collectively classified as white-rot fungi, certain basidiomycetes efficiently degrade the major structural polymers of wood cell walls. A small subset of these Agaricomycetes, exemplified by Phlebiopsis gigantea, is capable of colonizing freshly exposed conifer sapwood despite its high content of extractives, which retards the establishment of other fungal species. The mechanism(s) by which P. gigantea tolerates and metabolizes resinous compounds have not been explored. Here, we report the annotated P. gigantea genome and compare profiles of its transcriptome and secretome when cultured on fresh-cut versus solvent-extracted loblolly pine wood. The P. gigantea genome contains a conventional repertoire of hydrolase genes involved in cellulose/hemicellulose degradation, whose patterns of expression were relatively unperturbed by the absence of extractives. The expression of genes typically ascribed to lignin degradation was also largely unaffected. In contrast, genes likely involved in the transformation and detoxification of wood extractives were highly induced in its presence. Their products included an ABC transporter, lipases, cytochrome P450s, glutathione S-transferase and aldehyde dehydrogenase. Other regulated genes of unknown function and several constitutively expressed genes are also likely involved in P. gigantea's extractives metabolism. These results contribute to our fundamental understanding of pioneer colonization of conifer wood and provide insight into the diverse chemistries employed by fungi in carbon cycling processes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus