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The Protective Effects of IGF-1 on Different Subpopulations of DRG Neurons with Neurotoxicity Induced by gp120 and Dideoxycytidine In Vitro.

Lu L, Dong H, Liu G, Yuan B, Li Y, Liu H - Biomol Ther (Seoul) (2014)

Bottom Line: Peripheral neuropathy induced by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and antiretroviral therapy is not only difficult to distinguish in clinical practice, but also difficult to relieve the pain symptoms by analgesics because of the severity of the disease at the later stage.DRG neurons were exposed to gp120 (500 pmol/L), ddC (50 μmol/L), gp120 (500 pmol/L) plus ddC (50 μmol/L), gp120 (500 pmol/L) plus IGF-1 (20 nmol/L), ddC (50 μmol/L) plus IGF-1 (20 nmol/L), gp120 (500 pmol/L) plus ddC (50 μmol/L) plus IGF-1 (20 nmol/L), respectively, for 72 hours.These data provide new insights in elucidating the pathogenesis of HIV infection- or antiretroviral therapy-related peripheral neuropathy and facilitating the development of novel treatment strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Shandong University Affiliated Shandong Provincial Hospital, Jinan 250021.

ABSTRACT
Peripheral neuropathy induced by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and antiretroviral therapy is not only difficult to distinguish in clinical practice, but also difficult to relieve the pain symptoms by analgesics because of the severity of the disease at the later stage. Hence, to explore the mechanisms of HIV-related neuropathy and find new therapeutic options are particularly important for relieving neuropathic pain symptoms of the patients. In the present study, primary cultured embryonic rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were used to determine the neurotoxic effects of HIV-gp120 protein and/or antiretroviral drug dideoxycytidine (ddC) and the therapeutic actions of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) on gp120- or ddC-induced neurotoxicity. DRG neurons were exposed to gp120 (500 pmol/L), ddC (50 μmol/L), gp120 (500 pmol/L) plus ddC (50 μmol/L), gp120 (500 pmol/L) plus IGF-1 (20 nmol/L), ddC (50 μmol/L) plus IGF-1 (20 nmol/L), gp120 (500 pmol/L) plus ddC (50 μmol/L) plus IGF-1 (20 nmol/L), respectively, for 72 hours. The results showed that gp120 and/or ddC caused neurotoxicity of primary cultured DRG neurons. Interestingly, the severity of neurotoxicity induced by gp120 and ddC was different in different subpopulation of DRG neurons. gp120 mainly affected large diameter DRG neurons (>25 μm), whereas ddC mainly affected small diameter DRG neurons (≤25 μm). IGF-1 could reverse the neurotoxicity induced by gp120 and/or ddC on small, but not large, DRG neurons. These data provide new insights in elucidating the pathogenesis of HIV infection- or antiretroviral therapy-related peripheral neuropathy and facilitating the development of novel treatment strategies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Double fluorescent labeling of MAP2 and GAP-43 of DRG neurons treatment with different agents. Panel A (control): A1, MAP2-IR neurons; A2, GAP-43-IR neurons; A3, overlay of A1 and A2. Panel B (500 pmol/L gp120): B1, MAP2-IR neurons; B2, GAP-43-IR neurons; B3, overlay of B1 and B2. Panel C (50 μmol/L ddC): C1, MAP2-IR neurons; C2, GAP-43-IR neurons; C3, overlay of C1 and C2. Panel D (500 pmol/L gp120+50 μmol/L ddC): D1, MAP2-IR neurons; D2, GAP-43-IR neurons; D3, overlay of D1 and D2. Panel E (500 pmol/L gp120+IGF-1): E1, MAP2-IR neurons; E2, GAP-43-IR neurons; E3, overlay of E1 and E2. Panel F (50 μmol/L ddC+IGF-1): F1, MAP2-IR neurons; F2, GAP-43-IR neurons; F3, overlay of F1 and F2. Panel G (500 pmol/L gp120+50 μmol/L ddC+IGF-1): G1, MAP2-IR neurons; G2, GAP-43-IR neurons; G3, overlay of G1 and G2. Scale bar=50 μm.
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f4-bt-22-532: Double fluorescent labeling of MAP2 and GAP-43 of DRG neurons treatment with different agents. Panel A (control): A1, MAP2-IR neurons; A2, GAP-43-IR neurons; A3, overlay of A1 and A2. Panel B (500 pmol/L gp120): B1, MAP2-IR neurons; B2, GAP-43-IR neurons; B3, overlay of B1 and B2. Panel C (50 μmol/L ddC): C1, MAP2-IR neurons; C2, GAP-43-IR neurons; C3, overlay of C1 and C2. Panel D (500 pmol/L gp120+50 μmol/L ddC): D1, MAP2-IR neurons; D2, GAP-43-IR neurons; D3, overlay of D1 and D2. Panel E (500 pmol/L gp120+IGF-1): E1, MAP2-IR neurons; E2, GAP-43-IR neurons; E3, overlay of E1 and E2. Panel F (50 μmol/L ddC+IGF-1): F1, MAP2-IR neurons; F2, GAP-43-IR neurons; F3, overlay of F1 and F2. Panel G (500 pmol/L gp120+50 μmol/L ddC+IGF-1): G1, MAP2-IR neurons; G2, GAP-43-IR neurons; G3, overlay of G1 and G2. Scale bar=50 μm.

Mentions: To determine the percentage of GAP-43-IR neurons of small DRG neurons (the diameter of neuronal cell body ≤ 25 μm), DRG neuronal cultures at 72 hours after treatment with different agents were processed for double fluorescent labeling of MAP2 and GAP-43. The percentage of GAP-43-IR neurons of small DRG neurons in control group, gp120 (500 pmol/L), ddC (50 μmol/L), gp120 (500 pmol/L)+ddC (50 μmol/L), gp120 (500 pmol/L)+IGF-1 (20 nmol/L), ddC (50 μmol/L)+IGF-1 (20 nmol/L), and gp120 (500 pmol/L)+ddC (50 μmol/L)+IGF-1 (20 nmol/L) treated cultures was 39.6 ± 5.3%, 27.2 ± 3.4%, 20.6 ± 4.1%, 17.3 ± 3.9%, 34.0 ± 4.0%, 30.2 ± 4.2%, and 26.8 ± 4.0%, respectively. The percentage of GAP-43-IR neurons decreased significantly in gp120 and/or ddC treated cultures (gp120, F=0.871, p=0.002; ddC, F=0.175, p=0.000; gp120+ddC, F=0.319, p=0.000). ddC caused more severe decreases in the percentage of GAP-43-IR neurons of small DRG neurons compared with that in gp120-treated cultures (F=0.503, p=0.023). The combination of gp120 and ddC did not cause any further decreases in the percentage of GAP-43-IR neurons of small DRG neurons compared with that in ddC-treated cultures suggesting a ceiling effect. Exogenous IGF-1 administration increased the proportion of GAP-43-IR neurons of small DRG neurons in the presence of gp120 and/ or ddC (gp120, F=0.178, p=0.019; ddC, F=0.015, p=0.006; gp120+ddC, F=0.008, p=0.005) (Fig. 4, 5).


The Protective Effects of IGF-1 on Different Subpopulations of DRG Neurons with Neurotoxicity Induced by gp120 and Dideoxycytidine In Vitro.

Lu L, Dong H, Liu G, Yuan B, Li Y, Liu H - Biomol Ther (Seoul) (2014)

Double fluorescent labeling of MAP2 and GAP-43 of DRG neurons treatment with different agents. Panel A (control): A1, MAP2-IR neurons; A2, GAP-43-IR neurons; A3, overlay of A1 and A2. Panel B (500 pmol/L gp120): B1, MAP2-IR neurons; B2, GAP-43-IR neurons; B3, overlay of B1 and B2. Panel C (50 μmol/L ddC): C1, MAP2-IR neurons; C2, GAP-43-IR neurons; C3, overlay of C1 and C2. Panel D (500 pmol/L gp120+50 μmol/L ddC): D1, MAP2-IR neurons; D2, GAP-43-IR neurons; D3, overlay of D1 and D2. Panel E (500 pmol/L gp120+IGF-1): E1, MAP2-IR neurons; E2, GAP-43-IR neurons; E3, overlay of E1 and E2. Panel F (50 μmol/L ddC+IGF-1): F1, MAP2-IR neurons; F2, GAP-43-IR neurons; F3, overlay of F1 and F2. Panel G (500 pmol/L gp120+50 μmol/L ddC+IGF-1): G1, MAP2-IR neurons; G2, GAP-43-IR neurons; G3, overlay of G1 and G2. Scale bar=50 μm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4256033&req=5

f4-bt-22-532: Double fluorescent labeling of MAP2 and GAP-43 of DRG neurons treatment with different agents. Panel A (control): A1, MAP2-IR neurons; A2, GAP-43-IR neurons; A3, overlay of A1 and A2. Panel B (500 pmol/L gp120): B1, MAP2-IR neurons; B2, GAP-43-IR neurons; B3, overlay of B1 and B2. Panel C (50 μmol/L ddC): C1, MAP2-IR neurons; C2, GAP-43-IR neurons; C3, overlay of C1 and C2. Panel D (500 pmol/L gp120+50 μmol/L ddC): D1, MAP2-IR neurons; D2, GAP-43-IR neurons; D3, overlay of D1 and D2. Panel E (500 pmol/L gp120+IGF-1): E1, MAP2-IR neurons; E2, GAP-43-IR neurons; E3, overlay of E1 and E2. Panel F (50 μmol/L ddC+IGF-1): F1, MAP2-IR neurons; F2, GAP-43-IR neurons; F3, overlay of F1 and F2. Panel G (500 pmol/L gp120+50 μmol/L ddC+IGF-1): G1, MAP2-IR neurons; G2, GAP-43-IR neurons; G3, overlay of G1 and G2. Scale bar=50 μm.
Mentions: To determine the percentage of GAP-43-IR neurons of small DRG neurons (the diameter of neuronal cell body ≤ 25 μm), DRG neuronal cultures at 72 hours after treatment with different agents were processed for double fluorescent labeling of MAP2 and GAP-43. The percentage of GAP-43-IR neurons of small DRG neurons in control group, gp120 (500 pmol/L), ddC (50 μmol/L), gp120 (500 pmol/L)+ddC (50 μmol/L), gp120 (500 pmol/L)+IGF-1 (20 nmol/L), ddC (50 μmol/L)+IGF-1 (20 nmol/L), and gp120 (500 pmol/L)+ddC (50 μmol/L)+IGF-1 (20 nmol/L) treated cultures was 39.6 ± 5.3%, 27.2 ± 3.4%, 20.6 ± 4.1%, 17.3 ± 3.9%, 34.0 ± 4.0%, 30.2 ± 4.2%, and 26.8 ± 4.0%, respectively. The percentage of GAP-43-IR neurons decreased significantly in gp120 and/or ddC treated cultures (gp120, F=0.871, p=0.002; ddC, F=0.175, p=0.000; gp120+ddC, F=0.319, p=0.000). ddC caused more severe decreases in the percentage of GAP-43-IR neurons of small DRG neurons compared with that in gp120-treated cultures (F=0.503, p=0.023). The combination of gp120 and ddC did not cause any further decreases in the percentage of GAP-43-IR neurons of small DRG neurons compared with that in ddC-treated cultures suggesting a ceiling effect. Exogenous IGF-1 administration increased the proportion of GAP-43-IR neurons of small DRG neurons in the presence of gp120 and/ or ddC (gp120, F=0.178, p=0.019; ddC, F=0.015, p=0.006; gp120+ddC, F=0.008, p=0.005) (Fig. 4, 5).

Bottom Line: Peripheral neuropathy induced by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and antiretroviral therapy is not only difficult to distinguish in clinical practice, but also difficult to relieve the pain symptoms by analgesics because of the severity of the disease at the later stage.DRG neurons were exposed to gp120 (500 pmol/L), ddC (50 μmol/L), gp120 (500 pmol/L) plus ddC (50 μmol/L), gp120 (500 pmol/L) plus IGF-1 (20 nmol/L), ddC (50 μmol/L) plus IGF-1 (20 nmol/L), gp120 (500 pmol/L) plus ddC (50 μmol/L) plus IGF-1 (20 nmol/L), respectively, for 72 hours.These data provide new insights in elucidating the pathogenesis of HIV infection- or antiretroviral therapy-related peripheral neuropathy and facilitating the development of novel treatment strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Shandong University Affiliated Shandong Provincial Hospital, Jinan 250021.

ABSTRACT
Peripheral neuropathy induced by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and antiretroviral therapy is not only difficult to distinguish in clinical practice, but also difficult to relieve the pain symptoms by analgesics because of the severity of the disease at the later stage. Hence, to explore the mechanisms of HIV-related neuropathy and find new therapeutic options are particularly important for relieving neuropathic pain symptoms of the patients. In the present study, primary cultured embryonic rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were used to determine the neurotoxic effects of HIV-gp120 protein and/or antiretroviral drug dideoxycytidine (ddC) and the therapeutic actions of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) on gp120- or ddC-induced neurotoxicity. DRG neurons were exposed to gp120 (500 pmol/L), ddC (50 μmol/L), gp120 (500 pmol/L) plus ddC (50 μmol/L), gp120 (500 pmol/L) plus IGF-1 (20 nmol/L), ddC (50 μmol/L) plus IGF-1 (20 nmol/L), gp120 (500 pmol/L) plus ddC (50 μmol/L) plus IGF-1 (20 nmol/L), respectively, for 72 hours. The results showed that gp120 and/or ddC caused neurotoxicity of primary cultured DRG neurons. Interestingly, the severity of neurotoxicity induced by gp120 and ddC was different in different subpopulation of DRG neurons. gp120 mainly affected large diameter DRG neurons (>25 μm), whereas ddC mainly affected small diameter DRG neurons (≤25 μm). IGF-1 could reverse the neurotoxicity induced by gp120 and/or ddC on small, but not large, DRG neurons. These data provide new insights in elucidating the pathogenesis of HIV infection- or antiretroviral therapy-related peripheral neuropathy and facilitating the development of novel treatment strategies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus