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Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma possible application in wound healing.

Haertel B, von Woedtke T, Weltmann KD, Lindequist U - Biomol Ther (Seoul) (2014)

Bottom Line: Therefore, it cannot be equated with plasma from blood; it is not biological in nature.This review emphasizes plasma effects on wound healing.We summarize the effects of plasma on eukaryotic cells, especially on keratinocytes in terms of viability, proliferation, DNA, adhesion molecules and angiogenesis together with the role of reactive oxygen species and other components of plasma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pharmaceutical Biology, Institute of Pharmacy, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt University of Greifswald, D17489 Greifswald, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma, also named cold plasma, is defined as a partly ionized gas. Therefore, it cannot be equated with plasma from blood; it is not biological in nature. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma is a new innovative approach in medicine not only for the treatment of wounds, but with a wide-range of other applications, as e.g. topical treatment of other skin diseases with microbial involvement or treatment of cancer diseases. This review emphasizes plasma effects on wound healing. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma can support wound healing by its antiseptic effects, by stimulation of proliferation and migration of wound relating skin cells, by activation or inhibition of integrin receptors on the cell surface or by its pro-angiogenic effect. We summarize the effects of plasma on eukaryotic cells, especially on keratinocytes in terms of viability, proliferation, DNA, adhesion molecules and angiogenesis together with the role of reactive oxygen species and other components of plasma. The outcome of first clinical trials regarding wound healing is pointed out.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic summary of plasma effects on eukaryotic cells. Some interplay between plasma components e.g. reactive radicals or UV radiation and resulting effects are depicted. Effects on different levels of the cells were recognized.
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f6-bt-22-477: Schematic summary of plasma effects on eukaryotic cells. Some interplay between plasma components e.g. reactive radicals or UV radiation and resulting effects are depicted. Effects on different levels of the cells were recognized.

Mentions: Figure 6 summarizes the effects of plasma on eukaryotic cells and tries to demonstrate some interplay between plasma components e.g. reactive radicals or UV radiation and resulting effects. Effects on different levels of the cells were recognized. First target is the cell membrane with its lipids and all embedded receptor proteins or enzymes. Lipid peroxidation and modification of cell adhesion molecules were observed resulting e.g. in an altered cell migration and cell signaling. Reactive molecules reach the cells possibly by diffusion, but they can also be induced within the cells and can thereby exert their effects e.g. on proteins. UV radiation and reactive radicals are further able to influence the DNA leading to a change of cell proliferation or induction of apoptosis. All these effects are dependent on the plasma dose/plasma treatment time and thereby both stimulating and deleterious effects are possible.


Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma possible application in wound healing.

Haertel B, von Woedtke T, Weltmann KD, Lindequist U - Biomol Ther (Seoul) (2014)

Schematic summary of plasma effects on eukaryotic cells. Some interplay between plasma components e.g. reactive radicals or UV radiation and resulting effects are depicted. Effects on different levels of the cells were recognized.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4256026&req=5

f6-bt-22-477: Schematic summary of plasma effects on eukaryotic cells. Some interplay between plasma components e.g. reactive radicals or UV radiation and resulting effects are depicted. Effects on different levels of the cells were recognized.
Mentions: Figure 6 summarizes the effects of plasma on eukaryotic cells and tries to demonstrate some interplay between plasma components e.g. reactive radicals or UV radiation and resulting effects. Effects on different levels of the cells were recognized. First target is the cell membrane with its lipids and all embedded receptor proteins or enzymes. Lipid peroxidation and modification of cell adhesion molecules were observed resulting e.g. in an altered cell migration and cell signaling. Reactive molecules reach the cells possibly by diffusion, but they can also be induced within the cells and can thereby exert their effects e.g. on proteins. UV radiation and reactive radicals are further able to influence the DNA leading to a change of cell proliferation or induction of apoptosis. All these effects are dependent on the plasma dose/plasma treatment time and thereby both stimulating and deleterious effects are possible.

Bottom Line: Therefore, it cannot be equated with plasma from blood; it is not biological in nature.This review emphasizes plasma effects on wound healing.We summarize the effects of plasma on eukaryotic cells, especially on keratinocytes in terms of viability, proliferation, DNA, adhesion molecules and angiogenesis together with the role of reactive oxygen species and other components of plasma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pharmaceutical Biology, Institute of Pharmacy, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt University of Greifswald, D17489 Greifswald, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma, also named cold plasma, is defined as a partly ionized gas. Therefore, it cannot be equated with plasma from blood; it is not biological in nature. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma is a new innovative approach in medicine not only for the treatment of wounds, but with a wide-range of other applications, as e.g. topical treatment of other skin diseases with microbial involvement or treatment of cancer diseases. This review emphasizes plasma effects on wound healing. Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma can support wound healing by its antiseptic effects, by stimulation of proliferation and migration of wound relating skin cells, by activation or inhibition of integrin receptors on the cell surface or by its pro-angiogenic effect. We summarize the effects of plasma on eukaryotic cells, especially on keratinocytes in terms of viability, proliferation, DNA, adhesion molecules and angiogenesis together with the role of reactive oxygen species and other components of plasma. The outcome of first clinical trials regarding wound healing is pointed out.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus