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Positive pleiotropic effects of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor on vitiligo.

Noël M, Gagné C, Bergeron J, Jobin J, Poirier P - Lipids Health Dis (2004)

Bottom Line: HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are commonly used in medicine to control blood lipid disorder.The relation between simvastatin and regression of vitiligo in this case report may be related to the autoimmune pathophysiology of the disease.This unexpected beneficial impact provides another scientific credence to the hypothesis that immune mechanisms play a role in the development of vitiligo and that the use of statins as immuno-modulator could be of use not only for treatment relative to organ transplant but in other pathologies such as vitiligo.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre de Recherche Clinique, Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de Québec, Hôpital Laval, Ste-Foy, Canada. martin.noel@crhl.ulaval.ca

ABSTRACT

Background: HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are commonly used in medicine to control blood lipid disorder. Large clinical trials have demonstrated that statins greatly reduces cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality in patients with and without coronary artery disease. Also, the use of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors has been reported to have immunosuppressive effects.

Case presentation: We describe an unusual case of regression of vitiligo in a patient treated with high dose simvastatin. The relation between simvastatin and regression of vitiligo in this case report may be related to the autoimmune pathophysiology of the disease.

Conclusion: This unexpected beneficial impact provides another scientific credence to the hypothesis that immune mechanisms play a role in the development of vitiligo and that the use of statins as immuno-modulator could be of use not only for treatment relative to organ transplant but in other pathologies such as vitiligo.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Subject's picture showing a positive and unattended side effect of simvastatin on skin depigmenting disorder called vitiligo.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Figure 2: Subject's picture showing a positive and unattended side effect of simvastatin on skin depigmenting disorder called vitiligo.

Mentions: According to the study protocol requirement, simvastatin was stopped on March 28th, 2001 until May 18th, 2001 when atorvastatin (Lipitor®; Pfizer; New York, USA) 10 mg per os OD was introduced. Five days later, on May 23rd, 2001, following the subject's request and the study physician recommendation, the subject was pulled out of the study due to the study medication's side effects (headaches). At the physical exam of May 23rd, 2001, it was noticed by the physician and reported by the subject that skin depigmentation secondary to vitiligo had increased significantly since the entry in the study two months earlier especially in the face area. Following the study discharge, atorvastatin was stopped and simvastatin re-started at a dosage of 80 mg at bedtime. Later, consent form was obtained from the subject and pictures taken on July 18th, 2001 (Figure 1). At this point in time, the subject had recently started his medication and clear signs of skin depigmentation, comparable to those found at the physical exam 55 days ago, were still present. The subject returned for pictures on November 22nd, 2001 and August 21st, 2002 to compare the progression of his vitiligo in the summer and in the winter season (Figure 1). As compared in Figure 2, a clear regression of the skin's depigmentation of the face was noticeable between the sets of pictures when the subject was on and off simvastatin. Of notes, all other drugs were kept unchanged.


Positive pleiotropic effects of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor on vitiligo.

Noël M, Gagné C, Bergeron J, Jobin J, Poirier P - Lipids Health Dis (2004)

Subject's picture showing a positive and unattended side effect of simvastatin on skin depigmenting disorder called vitiligo.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC425594&req=5

Figure 2: Subject's picture showing a positive and unattended side effect of simvastatin on skin depigmenting disorder called vitiligo.
Mentions: According to the study protocol requirement, simvastatin was stopped on March 28th, 2001 until May 18th, 2001 when atorvastatin (Lipitor®; Pfizer; New York, USA) 10 mg per os OD was introduced. Five days later, on May 23rd, 2001, following the subject's request and the study physician recommendation, the subject was pulled out of the study due to the study medication's side effects (headaches). At the physical exam of May 23rd, 2001, it was noticed by the physician and reported by the subject that skin depigmentation secondary to vitiligo had increased significantly since the entry in the study two months earlier especially in the face area. Following the study discharge, atorvastatin was stopped and simvastatin re-started at a dosage of 80 mg at bedtime. Later, consent form was obtained from the subject and pictures taken on July 18th, 2001 (Figure 1). At this point in time, the subject had recently started his medication and clear signs of skin depigmentation, comparable to those found at the physical exam 55 days ago, were still present. The subject returned for pictures on November 22nd, 2001 and August 21st, 2002 to compare the progression of his vitiligo in the summer and in the winter season (Figure 1). As compared in Figure 2, a clear regression of the skin's depigmentation of the face was noticeable between the sets of pictures when the subject was on and off simvastatin. Of notes, all other drugs were kept unchanged.

Bottom Line: HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are commonly used in medicine to control blood lipid disorder.The relation between simvastatin and regression of vitiligo in this case report may be related to the autoimmune pathophysiology of the disease.This unexpected beneficial impact provides another scientific credence to the hypothesis that immune mechanisms play a role in the development of vitiligo and that the use of statins as immuno-modulator could be of use not only for treatment relative to organ transplant but in other pathologies such as vitiligo.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre de Recherche Clinique, Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de Québec, Hôpital Laval, Ste-Foy, Canada. martin.noel@crhl.ulaval.ca

ABSTRACT

Background: HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are commonly used in medicine to control blood lipid disorder. Large clinical trials have demonstrated that statins greatly reduces cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality in patients with and without coronary artery disease. Also, the use of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors has been reported to have immunosuppressive effects.

Case presentation: We describe an unusual case of regression of vitiligo in a patient treated with high dose simvastatin. The relation between simvastatin and regression of vitiligo in this case report may be related to the autoimmune pathophysiology of the disease.

Conclusion: This unexpected beneficial impact provides another scientific credence to the hypothesis that immune mechanisms play a role in the development of vitiligo and that the use of statins as immuno-modulator could be of use not only for treatment relative to organ transplant but in other pathologies such as vitiligo.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus