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Construct validity and impact of mode of administration of the PedsQL™ among a pediatric injury population.

Kruse S, Schneeberg A, Brussoni M - Health Qual Life Outcomes (2014)

Bottom Line: Pearson's correlations were highly significant across three modalities of survey administration: paper and pencil, computer and telephone administration (range: .92 to .97, p < .001).Bland-Altman plots showed strong consistency.This is important as depending on the setting, clinical or research, different modalities of completing this instrument may be more appropriate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: British Columbia Injury Research & Prevention Unit, F508 - 4480 Oak Street, Vancouver, BC, V6H 3V4, Canada. skruse@cw.bc.ca.

ABSTRACT

Background: The purpose of this study was to determine the construct validity of the PedsQL™ health related quality of life (HRQoL) instrument for use among injured children and to examine the impact of using different modes of administration, including paper and pencil, online and telephone.

Methods: Two hundred thirty-three participants (aged 0 - 16) were recruited from hospital wards and the emergency department of a pediatric hospital in a large urban center in British Columbia, Canada. Data used to evaluate the construct validity of the PedsQL™ were collected from participants at the time of seeking injury treatment (baseline) to capture a retrospective measure of pre injury health, and one month post injury. Data used to compare different modes of administration (n = 44) were collected at baseline. To assess construct validity repeated measures analysis of variance (rANOVA) was used to determine whether the PedsQL™ tool was able to discriminate between patients pre and post injury while investigating possible interaction by category of length of stay in hospital. The impact of different modalities of administering the PedsQL™ on item responses was investigated using Bland-Altman plots.

Results: rANOVA showed significant differences in PedsQL™ total score between baseline and one month post injury (p < .001), and differences in mean total score at one month post injury by category of injury severity (p < .001). There was also significant interaction by category of injury severity for the change in PedsQL™ total score from baseline to one month (p < .001). Pearson's correlations were highly significant across three modalities of survey administration: paper and pencil, computer and telephone administration (range: .92 to .97, p < .001). Bland-Altman plots showed strong consistency.

Conclusion: The PedsQL™ instrument is able to discriminate between pre and post injury HRQoL, as well as HRQoL post injury for injuries of varying severity. These findings are an indication that this instrument has good construct validity for the purpose of evaluating HRQoL of injured children. Data collected via paper-pencil, online and telephone administration were highly consistent. This is important as depending on the setting, clinical or research, different modalities of completing this instrument may be more appropriate.

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Bland-Altman plots for Total PedsQL scores.
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Fig2: Bland-Altman plots for Total PedsQL scores.

Mentions: Pearson’s correlations between total PedsQL scores across the three modalities were highly significant, ranging from 0.92 to 0.97 (p < .001). Overall, the Bland-Altman plots show considerable consistency across the different modalities of questionnaire administration (Figure 2). At most only three data points lay beyond two standard deviations of the mean when comparing the mean difference scores for each of the modalities. The majority of participants preferred internet based administration (54%), followed by paper and pencil (26%) and phone administration (20%).Figure 2


Construct validity and impact of mode of administration of the PedsQL™ among a pediatric injury population.

Kruse S, Schneeberg A, Brussoni M - Health Qual Life Outcomes (2014)

Bland-Altman plots for Total PedsQL scores.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4255920&req=5

Fig2: Bland-Altman plots for Total PedsQL scores.
Mentions: Pearson’s correlations between total PedsQL scores across the three modalities were highly significant, ranging from 0.92 to 0.97 (p < .001). Overall, the Bland-Altman plots show considerable consistency across the different modalities of questionnaire administration (Figure 2). At most only three data points lay beyond two standard deviations of the mean when comparing the mean difference scores for each of the modalities. The majority of participants preferred internet based administration (54%), followed by paper and pencil (26%) and phone administration (20%).Figure 2

Bottom Line: Pearson's correlations were highly significant across three modalities of survey administration: paper and pencil, computer and telephone administration (range: .92 to .97, p < .001).Bland-Altman plots showed strong consistency.This is important as depending on the setting, clinical or research, different modalities of completing this instrument may be more appropriate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: British Columbia Injury Research & Prevention Unit, F508 - 4480 Oak Street, Vancouver, BC, V6H 3V4, Canada. skruse@cw.bc.ca.

ABSTRACT

Background: The purpose of this study was to determine the construct validity of the PedsQL™ health related quality of life (HRQoL) instrument for use among injured children and to examine the impact of using different modes of administration, including paper and pencil, online and telephone.

Methods: Two hundred thirty-three participants (aged 0 - 16) were recruited from hospital wards and the emergency department of a pediatric hospital in a large urban center in British Columbia, Canada. Data used to evaluate the construct validity of the PedsQL™ were collected from participants at the time of seeking injury treatment (baseline) to capture a retrospective measure of pre injury health, and one month post injury. Data used to compare different modes of administration (n = 44) were collected at baseline. To assess construct validity repeated measures analysis of variance (rANOVA) was used to determine whether the PedsQL™ tool was able to discriminate between patients pre and post injury while investigating possible interaction by category of length of stay in hospital. The impact of different modalities of administering the PedsQL™ on item responses was investigated using Bland-Altman plots.

Results: rANOVA showed significant differences in PedsQL™ total score between baseline and one month post injury (p < .001), and differences in mean total score at one month post injury by category of injury severity (p < .001). There was also significant interaction by category of injury severity for the change in PedsQL™ total score from baseline to one month (p < .001). Pearson's correlations were highly significant across three modalities of survey administration: paper and pencil, computer and telephone administration (range: .92 to .97, p < .001). Bland-Altman plots showed strong consistency.

Conclusion: The PedsQL™ instrument is able to discriminate between pre and post injury HRQoL, as well as HRQoL post injury for injuries of varying severity. These findings are an indication that this instrument has good construct validity for the purpose of evaluating HRQoL of injured children. Data collected via paper-pencil, online and telephone administration were highly consistent. This is important as depending on the setting, clinical or research, different modalities of completing this instrument may be more appropriate.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus