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Australian endemic pest tephritids: genetic, molecular and microbial tools for improved Sterile Insect Technique.

Raphael KA, Shearman DC, Gilchrist AS, Sved JA, Morrow JL, Sherwin WB, Riegler M, Frommer M - BMC Genet. (2014)

Bottom Line: Transcriptomes from various species, tissues and developmental stages, to aid in identification of manipulation targets for improving SIT, have been assembled and are in the pipeline.Broad analyses of the microbiome have revealed a metagenome that is highly variable within and across species and defined by the environment.More specific analyses detected Wolbachia at low prevalence in the tropics but absent in temperate regions, suggesting a possible role for this endosymbiont in future control strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Among Australian endemic tephritid fruit flies, the sibling species Bactrocera tryoni and Bactrocera neohumeralis have been serious horticultural pests since the introduction of horticulture in the nineteenth century. More recently, Bactrocera jarvisi has also been declared a pest in northern Australia. After several decades of genetic research there is now a range of classical and molecular genetic tools that can be used to develop improved Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) strains for control of these pests. Four-way crossing strategies have the potential to overcome the problem of inbreeding in mass-reared strains of B. tryoni. The ability to produce hybrids between B. tryoni and the other two species in the laboratory has proved useful for the development of genetically marked strains. The identification of Y-chromosome markers in B. jarvisi means that male and female embryos can be distinguished in any strain that carries a B. jarvisi Y chromosome. This has enabled the study of homologues of the sex-determination genes during development of B jarvisi and B. tryoni, which is necessary for the generation of genetic-sexing strains. Germ-line transformation has been established and a draft genome sequence for B. tryoni released. Transcriptomes from various species, tissues and developmental stages, to aid in identification of manipulation targets for improving SIT, have been assembled and are in the pipeline. Broad analyses of the microbiome have revealed a metagenome that is highly variable within and across species and defined by the environment. More specific analyses detected Wolbachia at low prevalence in the tropics but absent in temperate regions, suggesting a possible role for this endosymbiont in future control strategies.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The 4-way crossing scheme to produce an outbred Factory strain [9]. Three domesticated (inbred) strains are maintained in the Factory and crossed following the illustrated scheme with the fourth strain coming from the mass-reared flies. Genetic markers can be incorporated via one of the inbred strains (1*). If the marker is mitochondrial DNA, then 1* must be all female and in the second generation cross the females must be the daughters of the marked females in generation 1.
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Figure 2: The 4-way crossing scheme to produce an outbred Factory strain [9]. Three domesticated (inbred) strains are maintained in the Factory and crossed following the illustrated scheme with the fourth strain coming from the mass-reared flies. Genetic markers can be incorporated via one of the inbred strains (1*). If the marker is mitochondrial DNA, then 1* must be all female and in the second generation cross the females must be the daughters of the marked females in generation 1.

Mentions: Introducing wild flies into the mass-reared strains every year is ineffective since the mass-reared strain immediately out-competes the wild flies, and simply repeats the problem of inbreeding after domestication. A solution to this problem was proposed by Gilchrist [9] who used a 4-way crossing scheme designed to allow simple and rapid annual replacement of mass-reared strains in even small facilities. The scheme, which involves crossing 3 partially inbred lines with an existing mass-reared strain (Figure 2), avoids the problem of inbreeding and lab adaptation while maintaining high productivity. Because these flies were outbred, their field performance approached that of wild flies, showing improved longevity, temperature stress resistance and dispersal, all important post-release fitness characters that allow released males to compete with wild flies in the field. Significantly, the high productivity shown by these hybrid strains was equal to that of the existing mass-reared strain, meaning that even with annual replacement, the facility will suffer no loss of output [22]. The scheme could be compatible with the incorporation of a genetic-sexing strain (GSS).


Australian endemic pest tephritids: genetic, molecular and microbial tools for improved Sterile Insect Technique.

Raphael KA, Shearman DC, Gilchrist AS, Sved JA, Morrow JL, Sherwin WB, Riegler M, Frommer M - BMC Genet. (2014)

The 4-way crossing scheme to produce an outbred Factory strain [9]. Three domesticated (inbred) strains are maintained in the Factory and crossed following the illustrated scheme with the fourth strain coming from the mass-reared flies. Genetic markers can be incorporated via one of the inbred strains (1*). If the marker is mitochondrial DNA, then 1* must be all female and in the second generation cross the females must be the daughters of the marked females in generation 1.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4255846&req=5

Figure 2: The 4-way crossing scheme to produce an outbred Factory strain [9]. Three domesticated (inbred) strains are maintained in the Factory and crossed following the illustrated scheme with the fourth strain coming from the mass-reared flies. Genetic markers can be incorporated via one of the inbred strains (1*). If the marker is mitochondrial DNA, then 1* must be all female and in the second generation cross the females must be the daughters of the marked females in generation 1.
Mentions: Introducing wild flies into the mass-reared strains every year is ineffective since the mass-reared strain immediately out-competes the wild flies, and simply repeats the problem of inbreeding after domestication. A solution to this problem was proposed by Gilchrist [9] who used a 4-way crossing scheme designed to allow simple and rapid annual replacement of mass-reared strains in even small facilities. The scheme, which involves crossing 3 partially inbred lines with an existing mass-reared strain (Figure 2), avoids the problem of inbreeding and lab adaptation while maintaining high productivity. Because these flies were outbred, their field performance approached that of wild flies, showing improved longevity, temperature stress resistance and dispersal, all important post-release fitness characters that allow released males to compete with wild flies in the field. Significantly, the high productivity shown by these hybrid strains was equal to that of the existing mass-reared strain, meaning that even with annual replacement, the facility will suffer no loss of output [22]. The scheme could be compatible with the incorporation of a genetic-sexing strain (GSS).

Bottom Line: Transcriptomes from various species, tissues and developmental stages, to aid in identification of manipulation targets for improving SIT, have been assembled and are in the pipeline.Broad analyses of the microbiome have revealed a metagenome that is highly variable within and across species and defined by the environment.More specific analyses detected Wolbachia at low prevalence in the tropics but absent in temperate regions, suggesting a possible role for this endosymbiont in future control strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Among Australian endemic tephritid fruit flies, the sibling species Bactrocera tryoni and Bactrocera neohumeralis have been serious horticultural pests since the introduction of horticulture in the nineteenth century. More recently, Bactrocera jarvisi has also been declared a pest in northern Australia. After several decades of genetic research there is now a range of classical and molecular genetic tools that can be used to develop improved Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) strains for control of these pests. Four-way crossing strategies have the potential to overcome the problem of inbreeding in mass-reared strains of B. tryoni. The ability to produce hybrids between B. tryoni and the other two species in the laboratory has proved useful for the development of genetically marked strains. The identification of Y-chromosome markers in B. jarvisi means that male and female embryos can be distinguished in any strain that carries a B. jarvisi Y chromosome. This has enabled the study of homologues of the sex-determination genes during development of B jarvisi and B. tryoni, which is necessary for the generation of genetic-sexing strains. Germ-line transformation has been established and a draft genome sequence for B. tryoni released. Transcriptomes from various species, tissues and developmental stages, to aid in identification of manipulation targets for improving SIT, have been assembled and are in the pipeline. Broad analyses of the microbiome have revealed a metagenome that is highly variable within and across species and defined by the environment. More specific analyses detected Wolbachia at low prevalence in the tropics but absent in temperate regions, suggesting a possible role for this endosymbiont in future control strategies.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus