Limits...
Surgical travellers: tapestry to Bayeux.

Hedley-Whyte J, Milamed DR - Ulster Med J (2014)

Bottom Line: Kenner.King and Churchill were correct but total Allied air superiority allowed wide use of many of the Allies' Dakotas; 10,000 DC-3s were eventually in service.The multifaceted role of the Princess Royal in the Emergency Medical Services of the United Kingdom and her close liaison with the Consultant Surgeons was of great value to the Allies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: David S. Sheridan Professorship in Anaesthesia and Respiratory Therapy Harvard University, 1400 VFW Parkway Boston, MA 02132-4927 USA.

ABSTRACT
The planning for surgery in war was revisited in 1937 when Ian Fraser was elected a member of the Surgical Travellers. At their 1938 Surgical Travellers meeting in Vienna, Ian and Eleanor Fraser were evicted from their hotel room by the Nazis. The 1939 meeting in Belfast discussed the organization of surgery and the conduct of Emergency Medical Service Hospitals in the United Kingdom; the vast majority were to be under civilian government and military control. From 1943 lengthy and informative organizational meetings were held at least monthly under the chairmanship of Sir Alexander Hood, KBE, Head of the RAMC. Surgical Consultants, now Major Generals, Brigadiers or Full Colonels in the British and U.S. Armies stationed in the UK, prepared for the invasion of Europe. The allocation of medical, surgical, nursing and auxiliary responsibilities was delineated. Liaison with the RAF and US Army Air Force was close as it was with the proposed leaders, Ulstermen Brooke and Montgomery. Montgomery chose Arthur Porritt as Surgeon in Chief to Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force (SHAEF), and Eisenhower, General Albert W. Kenner. Just after D-Day, Porritt met Ian Fraser, who had waded in on Arromanches Beach. The triage and evacuation plans for Allied casualties had been controversial, particularly as regards Landing Ship Tanks (LSTs). The dispute with the Hood-selected surgeons on one side, against medical and surgical deployment of LSTs, and Admiral Ernest King and Winston Churchill on the other, favouring LST use for surgery and evacuation. King and Churchill were correct but total Allied air superiority allowed wide use of many of the Allies' Dakotas; 10,000 DC-3s were eventually in service. Supported by forty Allied combat planes to each Luftwaffe, the dispute about Landing Ship Tank use in about a fortnight became moot. The multifaceted role of the Princess Royal in the Emergency Medical Services of the United Kingdom and her close liaison with the Consultant Surgeons was of great value to the Allies.

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Baron Porritt of Wanganui and Hampstead, GCMG, GCVO, CBE (1900-1994)13. Portrait, oil on canvas, 128 x 93 cm,1964-65, by Sir James Gunn, RA. Reproduced with permission of the Hunterian Museum, Royal College of Surgeons of England, solely for this Medical History. Arthur Espie Porritt was born in Wanganui; his father was a surgeon as was his maternal grandfather. His commendable academic and athletic performances led to a Rhodes to Magdalen, Oxford. At the 1924 Paris Olympics he took a bronze in the 100 meters. Although a knee problem prevented further competition, he served as captain of New Zealand's Olympic Team in Amsterdam in 1928, the year he qualified BM from Oxford. Through house jobs at Mary's and after being Assistant Director of the Professorial Unit, he became surgeon to Mary's and then Surgeon-in-Ordinary to the Duke of York, later HM King George VI. Placed by Hood in the BEF2, he became known to Ulstermen Brooke, Alexander and Montgomery. In North Africa with Montgomery he was chosen as Surgeon in Chief Designate to SHAEF to help Montgomery and Eisenhower14.Always cheerful, optimistic and supremely practical he liaised well after D-Day with Americans, Canadians, French, Poles and the Allied Air Forces. His Presidency of the Royal College of Surgeons of England from 1960-1963 was rewarded with a Baronetcy. In 1967 he was appointed Governor-General of New Zealand. He and Lady Porritt, a former Sister in QAIMNS, were extremely popular and successful for their five-year term in the land of Porritt's birth. His death at their home in St. John's Wood, London was on New Year's Day; he had been fully active until Christmas14.
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fig03: Baron Porritt of Wanganui and Hampstead, GCMG, GCVO, CBE (1900-1994)13. Portrait, oil on canvas, 128 x 93 cm,1964-65, by Sir James Gunn, RA. Reproduced with permission of the Hunterian Museum, Royal College of Surgeons of England, solely for this Medical History. Arthur Espie Porritt was born in Wanganui; his father was a surgeon as was his maternal grandfather. His commendable academic and athletic performances led to a Rhodes to Magdalen, Oxford. At the 1924 Paris Olympics he took a bronze in the 100 meters. Although a knee problem prevented further competition, he served as captain of New Zealand's Olympic Team in Amsterdam in 1928, the year he qualified BM from Oxford. Through house jobs at Mary's and after being Assistant Director of the Professorial Unit, he became surgeon to Mary's and then Surgeon-in-Ordinary to the Duke of York, later HM King George VI. Placed by Hood in the BEF2, he became known to Ulstermen Brooke, Alexander and Montgomery. In North Africa with Montgomery he was chosen as Surgeon in Chief Designate to SHAEF to help Montgomery and Eisenhower14.Always cheerful, optimistic and supremely practical he liaised well after D-Day with Americans, Canadians, French, Poles and the Allied Air Forces. His Presidency of the Royal College of Surgeons of England from 1960-1963 was rewarded with a Baronetcy. In 1967 he was appointed Governor-General of New Zealand. He and Lady Porritt, a former Sister in QAIMNS, were extremely popular and successful for their five-year term in the land of Porritt's birth. His death at their home in St. John's Wood, London was on New Year's Day; he had been fully active until Christmas14.

Mentions: Howard Florey decided, on the suggestion of Hugh Cairns, that Ian Fraser should test penicillin “in the forward area on war casualties”6,7. Heneage Ogilvie was at the same time, in 1942 and early 1943 in North Africa, Sicily and Italy, testing regimens for sulfonamides1. Fraser caught diphtheria at the Salerno landings and was flown to Catania to be cured by Max Rosenheim5. Ogilvie, promoted to Major General, was recalled to the UK to be the consultant surgeon for the Eastern Command, while my father, having left Musgrave Park in July 1942, was from September 1942 consultant surgeon in the adjacent Northern Command9. From Friday, 5 March 1943 my father had been meeting with General Paul Hawley and Colonel Professor Elliott Cutler at the U.S. Army Medical Corps European Headquarters in Cheltenham. Sir Alexander Hood, DGMS, RAMC agreed that Ian Fraser should be Ogilvie's understudy in Eastern Command and at the War Office. Hood also arranged that Ogilvie and Fraser should meet together with General Paul Hawley and Cutler of the U.S. Army Medical Service, Vice-Admiral Gordon Gordon- Taylor of the Royal Navy (Fig.2), and Brigadier Arthur Porritt, Chief Surgeon designate to Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Forces, together with Northern command's Angus Hedley-Whyte (Fig. 3). Meetings of the group were held at 10:00 a.m. during April to December 1943 and on Thursday 13 January 1944, Wednesday, 9 February, Thursday, 13 April and Thursday, 11 May 1944 and Monday, 15 May 1944. Topics discussed included D-Day's General Plan of Operation for Allied Medical Units and their supply9.


Surgical travellers: tapestry to Bayeux.

Hedley-Whyte J, Milamed DR - Ulster Med J (2014)

Baron Porritt of Wanganui and Hampstead, GCMG, GCVO, CBE (1900-1994)13. Portrait, oil on canvas, 128 x 93 cm,1964-65, by Sir James Gunn, RA. Reproduced with permission of the Hunterian Museum, Royal College of Surgeons of England, solely for this Medical History. Arthur Espie Porritt was born in Wanganui; his father was a surgeon as was his maternal grandfather. His commendable academic and athletic performances led to a Rhodes to Magdalen, Oxford. At the 1924 Paris Olympics he took a bronze in the 100 meters. Although a knee problem prevented further competition, he served as captain of New Zealand's Olympic Team in Amsterdam in 1928, the year he qualified BM from Oxford. Through house jobs at Mary's and after being Assistant Director of the Professorial Unit, he became surgeon to Mary's and then Surgeon-in-Ordinary to the Duke of York, later HM King George VI. Placed by Hood in the BEF2, he became known to Ulstermen Brooke, Alexander and Montgomery. In North Africa with Montgomery he was chosen as Surgeon in Chief Designate to SHAEF to help Montgomery and Eisenhower14.Always cheerful, optimistic and supremely practical he liaised well after D-Day with Americans, Canadians, French, Poles and the Allied Air Forces. His Presidency of the Royal College of Surgeons of England from 1960-1963 was rewarded with a Baronetcy. In 1967 he was appointed Governor-General of New Zealand. He and Lady Porritt, a former Sister in QAIMNS, were extremely popular and successful for their five-year term in the land of Porritt's birth. His death at their home in St. John's Wood, London was on New Year's Day; he had been fully active until Christmas14.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4255837&req=5

fig03: Baron Porritt of Wanganui and Hampstead, GCMG, GCVO, CBE (1900-1994)13. Portrait, oil on canvas, 128 x 93 cm,1964-65, by Sir James Gunn, RA. Reproduced with permission of the Hunterian Museum, Royal College of Surgeons of England, solely for this Medical History. Arthur Espie Porritt was born in Wanganui; his father was a surgeon as was his maternal grandfather. His commendable academic and athletic performances led to a Rhodes to Magdalen, Oxford. At the 1924 Paris Olympics he took a bronze in the 100 meters. Although a knee problem prevented further competition, he served as captain of New Zealand's Olympic Team in Amsterdam in 1928, the year he qualified BM from Oxford. Through house jobs at Mary's and after being Assistant Director of the Professorial Unit, he became surgeon to Mary's and then Surgeon-in-Ordinary to the Duke of York, later HM King George VI. Placed by Hood in the BEF2, he became known to Ulstermen Brooke, Alexander and Montgomery. In North Africa with Montgomery he was chosen as Surgeon in Chief Designate to SHAEF to help Montgomery and Eisenhower14.Always cheerful, optimistic and supremely practical he liaised well after D-Day with Americans, Canadians, French, Poles and the Allied Air Forces. His Presidency of the Royal College of Surgeons of England from 1960-1963 was rewarded with a Baronetcy. In 1967 he was appointed Governor-General of New Zealand. He and Lady Porritt, a former Sister in QAIMNS, were extremely popular and successful for their five-year term in the land of Porritt's birth. His death at their home in St. John's Wood, London was on New Year's Day; he had been fully active until Christmas14.
Mentions: Howard Florey decided, on the suggestion of Hugh Cairns, that Ian Fraser should test penicillin “in the forward area on war casualties”6,7. Heneage Ogilvie was at the same time, in 1942 and early 1943 in North Africa, Sicily and Italy, testing regimens for sulfonamides1. Fraser caught diphtheria at the Salerno landings and was flown to Catania to be cured by Max Rosenheim5. Ogilvie, promoted to Major General, was recalled to the UK to be the consultant surgeon for the Eastern Command, while my father, having left Musgrave Park in July 1942, was from September 1942 consultant surgeon in the adjacent Northern Command9. From Friday, 5 March 1943 my father had been meeting with General Paul Hawley and Colonel Professor Elliott Cutler at the U.S. Army Medical Corps European Headquarters in Cheltenham. Sir Alexander Hood, DGMS, RAMC agreed that Ian Fraser should be Ogilvie's understudy in Eastern Command and at the War Office. Hood also arranged that Ogilvie and Fraser should meet together with General Paul Hawley and Cutler of the U.S. Army Medical Service, Vice-Admiral Gordon Gordon- Taylor of the Royal Navy (Fig.2), and Brigadier Arthur Porritt, Chief Surgeon designate to Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Forces, together with Northern command's Angus Hedley-Whyte (Fig. 3). Meetings of the group were held at 10:00 a.m. during April to December 1943 and on Thursday 13 January 1944, Wednesday, 9 February, Thursday, 13 April and Thursday, 11 May 1944 and Monday, 15 May 1944. Topics discussed included D-Day's General Plan of Operation for Allied Medical Units and their supply9.

Bottom Line: Kenner.King and Churchill were correct but total Allied air superiority allowed wide use of many of the Allies' Dakotas; 10,000 DC-3s were eventually in service.The multifaceted role of the Princess Royal in the Emergency Medical Services of the United Kingdom and her close liaison with the Consultant Surgeons was of great value to the Allies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: David S. Sheridan Professorship in Anaesthesia and Respiratory Therapy Harvard University, 1400 VFW Parkway Boston, MA 02132-4927 USA.

ABSTRACT
The planning for surgery in war was revisited in 1937 when Ian Fraser was elected a member of the Surgical Travellers. At their 1938 Surgical Travellers meeting in Vienna, Ian and Eleanor Fraser were evicted from their hotel room by the Nazis. The 1939 meeting in Belfast discussed the organization of surgery and the conduct of Emergency Medical Service Hospitals in the United Kingdom; the vast majority were to be under civilian government and military control. From 1943 lengthy and informative organizational meetings were held at least monthly under the chairmanship of Sir Alexander Hood, KBE, Head of the RAMC. Surgical Consultants, now Major Generals, Brigadiers or Full Colonels in the British and U.S. Armies stationed in the UK, prepared for the invasion of Europe. The allocation of medical, surgical, nursing and auxiliary responsibilities was delineated. Liaison with the RAF and US Army Air Force was close as it was with the proposed leaders, Ulstermen Brooke and Montgomery. Montgomery chose Arthur Porritt as Surgeon in Chief to Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force (SHAEF), and Eisenhower, General Albert W. Kenner. Just after D-Day, Porritt met Ian Fraser, who had waded in on Arromanches Beach. The triage and evacuation plans for Allied casualties had been controversial, particularly as regards Landing Ship Tanks (LSTs). The dispute with the Hood-selected surgeons on one side, against medical and surgical deployment of LSTs, and Admiral Ernest King and Winston Churchill on the other, favouring LST use for surgery and evacuation. King and Churchill were correct but total Allied air superiority allowed wide use of many of the Allies' Dakotas; 10,000 DC-3s were eventually in service. Supported by forty Allied combat planes to each Luftwaffe, the dispute about Landing Ship Tank use in about a fortnight became moot. The multifaceted role of the Princess Royal in the Emergency Medical Services of the United Kingdom and her close liaison with the Consultant Surgeons was of great value to the Allies.

Show MeSH