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Task complexity and maximal isometric strength gains through motor learning.

McGuire J, Green LA, Gabriel DA - Physiol Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: Both groups exhibited comparable increases in strength (20.2%, P < 0.01) and reductions in mean torque variability (26.2%, P < 0.01), which were retained and transferred.There was a decrease in the coactivation ratio (antagonist/agonist muscle activity) for both groups, which was retained and transferred (35.2%, P < 0.01).The control group underwent a decrease in variability of the torque- and sEMG-time curves from the first day of training to retention, but participants returned to baseline levels during the transfer condition (P < 0.01).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Electromyographic Kinesiology Laboratory, Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Multiple correlational relationship predicting the log of torque variance ratio (VR) from log of the coactivation ratio and log of total surface electromyographic (sEMG) VR.
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fig05: Multiple correlational relationship predicting the log of torque variance ratio (VR) from log of the coactivation ratio and log of total surface electromyographic (sEMG) VR.

Mentions: Increases in maximal isometric wrist flexion torque were associated with a reduction in both log of RMS error (r = −0.51, P < 0.001) and the log of torque VR (r = −0.47, P < 0.001). There was a significant correlation between mean maximal isometric wrist flexion torque and the log of the coactivation ratio (r = −0.41, P = 0.001). The log of the RMS error had a slightly lower correlation with the log of the coactivation ratio (r = 0.34, P = 0.001). Figure 4 illustrates the interrelationship between the log of the coactivation ratio, maximal isometric wrist flexion torque, and the log of the RMS error. Decreases in the log of torque VR were associated with decreases in total sEMG VR, so the correlation between the two variables was r = 0.44 (P < 0.001). The log of torque VR had a slightly lower but significant correlation with the log of the coactivation ratio (r = 0.34, P < 0.001). Both sEMG variables (coactivation and variance) were used in a multiple regression prediction equation for the log of torque VR. The two sEMG predictor variables resulted in a multiple correlation coefficient of R = 0.51 (R2 = 0.26, P < 0.001) which is depicted in Figure 5.


Task complexity and maximal isometric strength gains through motor learning.

McGuire J, Green LA, Gabriel DA - Physiol Rep (2014)

Multiple correlational relationship predicting the log of torque variance ratio (VR) from log of the coactivation ratio and log of total surface electromyographic (sEMG) VR.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4255822&req=5

fig05: Multiple correlational relationship predicting the log of torque variance ratio (VR) from log of the coactivation ratio and log of total surface electromyographic (sEMG) VR.
Mentions: Increases in maximal isometric wrist flexion torque were associated with a reduction in both log of RMS error (r = −0.51, P < 0.001) and the log of torque VR (r = −0.47, P < 0.001). There was a significant correlation between mean maximal isometric wrist flexion torque and the log of the coactivation ratio (r = −0.41, P = 0.001). The log of the RMS error had a slightly lower correlation with the log of the coactivation ratio (r = 0.34, P = 0.001). Figure 4 illustrates the interrelationship between the log of the coactivation ratio, maximal isometric wrist flexion torque, and the log of the RMS error. Decreases in the log of torque VR were associated with decreases in total sEMG VR, so the correlation between the two variables was r = 0.44 (P < 0.001). The log of torque VR had a slightly lower but significant correlation with the log of the coactivation ratio (r = 0.34, P < 0.001). Both sEMG variables (coactivation and variance) were used in a multiple regression prediction equation for the log of torque VR. The two sEMG predictor variables resulted in a multiple correlation coefficient of R = 0.51 (R2 = 0.26, P < 0.001) which is depicted in Figure 5.

Bottom Line: Both groups exhibited comparable increases in strength (20.2%, P < 0.01) and reductions in mean torque variability (26.2%, P < 0.01), which were retained and transferred.There was a decrease in the coactivation ratio (antagonist/agonist muscle activity) for both groups, which was retained and transferred (35.2%, P < 0.01).The control group underwent a decrease in variability of the torque- and sEMG-time curves from the first day of training to retention, but participants returned to baseline levels during the transfer condition (P < 0.01).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Electromyographic Kinesiology Laboratory, Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus