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Does oxygen delivery explain interindividual variation in forearm critical impulse?

Kellawan JM, Bentley RF, Bravo MF, Moynes JS, Tschakovsky ME - Physiol Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: Both vasodilation (r(2) = 0.64, P < 0.001) and the exercise pressor response (r(2) = 0.33, P < 0.001) independently contributed to interindividual differences in FBF.Furthermore, individual differences in pressor response play an important role in determining differences in O2 delivery in addition to vasodilation.The mechanistic origins of this vasodilatory and pressor response heterogeneity across individuals remain to be determined.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Kinesiology, School of Education, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

ΔFVC and ΔMAP from baseline as predictors of ΔFBF. Panel A: ΔFBF versus ΔFVC as quantified by the difference between rest and the last 30 sec of the maximal effort test (r2 = 0.64, P < 0.001). Panel B: ΔFBF versus ΔMAP as quantified by the difference between rest and the last 30 sec of the maximal effort test (r2 = 0.33, P < 0.001).
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fig04: ΔFVC and ΔMAP from baseline as predictors of ΔFBF. Panel A: ΔFBF versus ΔFVC as quantified by the difference between rest and the last 30 sec of the maximal effort test (r2 = 0.64, P < 0.001). Panel B: ΔFBF versus ΔMAP as quantified by the difference between rest and the last 30 sec of the maximal effort test (r2 = 0.33, P < 0.001).

Mentions: When assessed separately with simple linear regression, correlation of ΔFBF with ΔFVC from baseline was statistically significant (r = 0.80, r2 = 0.64, P = 0.006) but not with ΔMAP (r = 0.49, r2 = 0.235, P = 0.15). However, forward stepwise linear regression analysis revealed that the addition of ΔMAP to ΔFVC substantially improved the model's ability to account for interindividual variation in FBF (Table 3 and Fig. 4).


Does oxygen delivery explain interindividual variation in forearm critical impulse?

Kellawan JM, Bentley RF, Bravo MF, Moynes JS, Tschakovsky ME - Physiol Rep (2014)

ΔFVC and ΔMAP from baseline as predictors of ΔFBF. Panel A: ΔFBF versus ΔFVC as quantified by the difference between rest and the last 30 sec of the maximal effort test (r2 = 0.64, P < 0.001). Panel B: ΔFBF versus ΔMAP as quantified by the difference between rest and the last 30 sec of the maximal effort test (r2 = 0.33, P < 0.001).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4255810&req=5

fig04: ΔFVC and ΔMAP from baseline as predictors of ΔFBF. Panel A: ΔFBF versus ΔFVC as quantified by the difference between rest and the last 30 sec of the maximal effort test (r2 = 0.64, P < 0.001). Panel B: ΔFBF versus ΔMAP as quantified by the difference between rest and the last 30 sec of the maximal effort test (r2 = 0.33, P < 0.001).
Mentions: When assessed separately with simple linear regression, correlation of ΔFBF with ΔFVC from baseline was statistically significant (r = 0.80, r2 = 0.64, P = 0.006) but not with ΔMAP (r = 0.49, r2 = 0.235, P = 0.15). However, forward stepwise linear regression analysis revealed that the addition of ΔMAP to ΔFVC substantially improved the model's ability to account for interindividual variation in FBF (Table 3 and Fig. 4).

Bottom Line: Both vasodilation (r(2) = 0.64, P < 0.001) and the exercise pressor response (r(2) = 0.33, P < 0.001) independently contributed to interindividual differences in FBF.Furthermore, individual differences in pressor response play an important role in determining differences in O2 delivery in addition to vasodilation.The mechanistic origins of this vasodilatory and pressor response heterogeneity across individuals remain to be determined.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Kinesiology, School of Education, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus