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Differential contribution of ACh-muscarinic and β-adrenergic receptors to vasodilatation in noncontracting muscle during voluntary one-legged exercise.

Ishii K, Matsukawa K, Liang N, Endo K, Idesako M, Hamada H, Kataoka T, Ueno K, Watanabe T, Takahashi M - Physiol Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: Propranolol also failed to affect the initial increases in femoral blood flow and vascular conductance of nonexercising leg but significantly attenuated (P < 0.05) their later increases during exercise.Subsequent atropine (10-15 μg/kg iv) abolished the initial increases in Oxy-Hb of both VL muscles.It is likely that the rapid cholinergic and delayed β-adrenergic vasodilator mechanisms cooperate to increase muscle blood flow during exercise.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Integrative Physiology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) The time courses of the changes in MAP and mean internal diameter, blood flow velocity, blood flow, and vascular conductance of the femoral artery of nonexercising limb during voluntary one‐legged cycling at 20% MVE in the control (○, n = 5 subjects), propranolol (, n = 5 subjects), and atropine and propranolol conditions (●, n = 4 subjects). Each variable was sequentially calculated every 5 s. (B) The initial and later changes in MAP, femoral blood flow, and femoral vascular conductance during voluntary one‐legged cycling at 20% MVE in the control (□) and propranolol conditions () (n = 5 subjects). The femoral blood flow data in the atropine and propranolol condition were not statistically analyzed due to the small sample size. CON, control condition. PROP, propranolol condition. ATR+PROP, atropine and propranolol condition. *Significant difference (P <0.05) from the baseline. †Significant difference (P <0.05) between the control and propranolol conditions. N.S., not significant (P >0.05).
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fig03: (A) The time courses of the changes in MAP and mean internal diameter, blood flow velocity, blood flow, and vascular conductance of the femoral artery of nonexercising limb during voluntary one‐legged cycling at 20% MVE in the control (○, n = 5 subjects), propranolol (, n = 5 subjects), and atropine and propranolol conditions (●, n = 4 subjects). Each variable was sequentially calculated every 5 s. (B) The initial and later changes in MAP, femoral blood flow, and femoral vascular conductance during voluntary one‐legged cycling at 20% MVE in the control (□) and propranolol conditions () (n = 5 subjects). The femoral blood flow data in the atropine and propranolol condition were not statistically analyzed due to the small sample size. CON, control condition. PROP, propranolol condition. ATR+PROP, atropine and propranolol condition. *Significant difference (P <0.05) from the baseline. †Significant difference (P <0.05) between the control and propranolol conditions. N.S., not significant (P >0.05).

Mentions: Figure 3A represents the time courses of the average changes in MAP and the Doppler variables of the nonexercising limb during one‐legged cycling at 20% MVE. Femoral blood flow and vascular conductance as well as FBV increased during the exercise with a gradual rise in MAP, whereas mean internal diameter of the artery was unchanged throughout the exercise. Propranolol hardly affected the initial femoral blood flow responses but blunted their later increases without changing the femoral internal diameter (Fig. 3A). The effects of propranolol on the initial and later changes in MAP, femoral blood flow, and femoral vascular conductance are summarized in Fig. 3B. MAP did not change significantly at the early period but increased during the later period of exercise. The initial and later changes in MAP were not different (P >0.05) between the control and propranolol conditions (Fig. 3B). Although propranolol showed a tendency to attenuate the initial increases in femoral blood flow and vascular conductance, the effects were not significant (P >0.05). In contrast, the later increases in femoral blood flow and vascular conductance were substantially attenuated (P <0.05) by propranolol in Fig. 3B. Subsequent atropine and propranolol tended to abolish the initial increases in femoral blood flow and vascular conductance during the exercise (Fig. 3A).


Differential contribution of ACh-muscarinic and β-adrenergic receptors to vasodilatation in noncontracting muscle during voluntary one-legged exercise.

Ishii K, Matsukawa K, Liang N, Endo K, Idesako M, Hamada H, Kataoka T, Ueno K, Watanabe T, Takahashi M - Physiol Rep (2014)

(A) The time courses of the changes in MAP and mean internal diameter, blood flow velocity, blood flow, and vascular conductance of the femoral artery of nonexercising limb during voluntary one‐legged cycling at 20% MVE in the control (○, n = 5 subjects), propranolol (, n = 5 subjects), and atropine and propranolol conditions (●, n = 4 subjects). Each variable was sequentially calculated every 5 s. (B) The initial and later changes in MAP, femoral blood flow, and femoral vascular conductance during voluntary one‐legged cycling at 20% MVE in the control (□) and propranolol conditions () (n = 5 subjects). The femoral blood flow data in the atropine and propranolol condition were not statistically analyzed due to the small sample size. CON, control condition. PROP, propranolol condition. ATR+PROP, atropine and propranolol condition. *Significant difference (P <0.05) from the baseline. †Significant difference (P <0.05) between the control and propranolol conditions. N.S., not significant (P >0.05).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4255809&req=5

fig03: (A) The time courses of the changes in MAP and mean internal diameter, blood flow velocity, blood flow, and vascular conductance of the femoral artery of nonexercising limb during voluntary one‐legged cycling at 20% MVE in the control (○, n = 5 subjects), propranolol (, n = 5 subjects), and atropine and propranolol conditions (●, n = 4 subjects). Each variable was sequentially calculated every 5 s. (B) The initial and later changes in MAP, femoral blood flow, and femoral vascular conductance during voluntary one‐legged cycling at 20% MVE in the control (□) and propranolol conditions () (n = 5 subjects). The femoral blood flow data in the atropine and propranolol condition were not statistically analyzed due to the small sample size. CON, control condition. PROP, propranolol condition. ATR+PROP, atropine and propranolol condition. *Significant difference (P <0.05) from the baseline. †Significant difference (P <0.05) between the control and propranolol conditions. N.S., not significant (P >0.05).
Mentions: Figure 3A represents the time courses of the average changes in MAP and the Doppler variables of the nonexercising limb during one‐legged cycling at 20% MVE. Femoral blood flow and vascular conductance as well as FBV increased during the exercise with a gradual rise in MAP, whereas mean internal diameter of the artery was unchanged throughout the exercise. Propranolol hardly affected the initial femoral blood flow responses but blunted their later increases without changing the femoral internal diameter (Fig. 3A). The effects of propranolol on the initial and later changes in MAP, femoral blood flow, and femoral vascular conductance are summarized in Fig. 3B. MAP did not change significantly at the early period but increased during the later period of exercise. The initial and later changes in MAP were not different (P >0.05) between the control and propranolol conditions (Fig. 3B). Although propranolol showed a tendency to attenuate the initial increases in femoral blood flow and vascular conductance, the effects were not significant (P >0.05). In contrast, the later increases in femoral blood flow and vascular conductance were substantially attenuated (P <0.05) by propranolol in Fig. 3B. Subsequent atropine and propranolol tended to abolish the initial increases in femoral blood flow and vascular conductance during the exercise (Fig. 3A).

Bottom Line: Propranolol also failed to affect the initial increases in femoral blood flow and vascular conductance of nonexercising leg but significantly attenuated (P < 0.05) their later increases during exercise.Subsequent atropine (10-15 μg/kg iv) abolished the initial increases in Oxy-Hb of both VL muscles.It is likely that the rapid cholinergic and delayed β-adrenergic vasodilator mechanisms cooperate to increase muscle blood flow during exercise.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Integrative Physiology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus