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Characterization of acute ischemia-related physiological responses associated with remote ischemic preconditioning: a randomized controlled, crossover human study.

Sharma V, Cunniffe B, Verma AP, Cardinale M, Yellon D - Physiol Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: There is little evidence to support what limb (upper or lower) or cuff inflation pressures are most effective to deliver this intervention without causing undue discomfort/pain in nonanesthetized humans.Physiological changes in the occluded limb and any pain/discomfort associated with RIPC with each cuff inflation pressure were determined.However, whether benefits of RIPC can also be derived with protocols delivered to the upper limb using lower cuff inflation pressures and with lesser discomfort compared to the lower limb, remains to be investigated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Hatter Cardiovascular Institute, UCL, London, UK Department of Internal Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

In the upper limb, cuff inflation at 140, 160 and 180 mmHg during all three cycles of RIPC led to cyclical rise in the capillary arterial lactate levels, which returned to baseline by the end of 5 min of cuff deflation. In the lower limb, significant cyclical rise and fall in capillary arterial lactate levels was only noted at a cuff inflation pressure of 180 mmHg.
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fig05: In the upper limb, cuff inflation at 140, 160 and 180 mmHg during all three cycles of RIPC led to cyclical rise in the capillary arterial lactate levels, which returned to baseline by the end of 5 min of cuff deflation. In the lower limb, significant cyclical rise and fall in capillary arterial lactate levels was only noted at a cuff inflation pressure of 180 mmHg.

Mentions: There was a significant rise in the mean capillary arterial blood lactate levels with each of the three cuff inflations at 140, 160, and 180 mmHg cuff inflation pressures (P < 0.01) (Table 2). In all these cases, the mean lactate levels returned back to baseline levels at the end of 5 min of cuff deflation (Table 2; Fig. 5). Though there was a cyclical rise and fall in the mean lactate levels with the three cycles of RIPC, there was no cumulative increase in the lactate levels with successive cycles of RIPC. In the lower limb, similar significant increase in the mean lactate levels was only noted at 180 mmHg cuff inflation pressure (P < 0.01).


Characterization of acute ischemia-related physiological responses associated with remote ischemic preconditioning: a randomized controlled, crossover human study.

Sharma V, Cunniffe B, Verma AP, Cardinale M, Yellon D - Physiol Rep (2014)

In the upper limb, cuff inflation at 140, 160 and 180 mmHg during all three cycles of RIPC led to cyclical rise in the capillary arterial lactate levels, which returned to baseline by the end of 5 min of cuff deflation. In the lower limb, significant cyclical rise and fall in capillary arterial lactate levels was only noted at a cuff inflation pressure of 180 mmHg.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4255807&req=5

fig05: In the upper limb, cuff inflation at 140, 160 and 180 mmHg during all three cycles of RIPC led to cyclical rise in the capillary arterial lactate levels, which returned to baseline by the end of 5 min of cuff deflation. In the lower limb, significant cyclical rise and fall in capillary arterial lactate levels was only noted at a cuff inflation pressure of 180 mmHg.
Mentions: There was a significant rise in the mean capillary arterial blood lactate levels with each of the three cuff inflations at 140, 160, and 180 mmHg cuff inflation pressures (P < 0.01) (Table 2). In all these cases, the mean lactate levels returned back to baseline levels at the end of 5 min of cuff deflation (Table 2; Fig. 5). Though there was a cyclical rise and fall in the mean lactate levels with the three cycles of RIPC, there was no cumulative increase in the lactate levels with successive cycles of RIPC. In the lower limb, similar significant increase in the mean lactate levels was only noted at 180 mmHg cuff inflation pressure (P < 0.01).

Bottom Line: There is little evidence to support what limb (upper or lower) or cuff inflation pressures are most effective to deliver this intervention without causing undue discomfort/pain in nonanesthetized humans.Physiological changes in the occluded limb and any pain/discomfort associated with RIPC with each cuff inflation pressure were determined.However, whether benefits of RIPC can also be derived with protocols delivered to the upper limb using lower cuff inflation pressures and with lesser discomfort compared to the lower limb, remains to be investigated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Hatter Cardiovascular Institute, UCL, London, UK Department of Internal Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus