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Characterization of acute ischemia-related physiological responses associated with remote ischemic preconditioning: a randomized controlled, crossover human study.

Sharma V, Cunniffe B, Verma AP, Cardinale M, Yellon D - Physiol Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: There is little evidence to support what limb (upper or lower) or cuff inflation pressures are most effective to deliver this intervention without causing undue discomfort/pain in nonanesthetized humans.Physiological changes in the occluded limb and any pain/discomfort associated with RIPC with each cuff inflation pressure were determined.However, whether benefits of RIPC can also be derived with protocols delivered to the upper limb using lower cuff inflation pressures and with lesser discomfort compared to the lower limb, remains to be investigated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Hatter Cardiovascular Institute, UCL, London, UK Department of Internal Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Illustration of the fraction of the total number volunteers (n =6) in whom arterial blood flow was occluded (shown in black) at each cuff inflation pressure per limb. (A) 140 mmHg (UL); (B) 160 mmHg (UL); (C) 180 mmHg (UL); (D) 140 mmHg (LL); (E) 160 mmHg (LL); (F) 180 mmHg (LL); UL, upper limb, LL, lower limb.
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fig02: Illustration of the fraction of the total number volunteers (n =6) in whom arterial blood flow was occluded (shown in black) at each cuff inflation pressure per limb. (A) 140 mmHg (UL); (B) 160 mmHg (UL); (C) 180 mmHg (UL); (D) 140 mmHg (LL); (E) 160 mmHg (LL); (F) 180 mmHg (LL); UL, upper limb, LL, lower limb.

Mentions: Cuff inflation pressure of 140 mmHg (Upper limb), caused a cessation of pulsatile arterial blood flow in three of six volunteers during all three RIPC cycles. This was identified through the loss of Doppler signal in the radial artery in the corresponding limb, distal to the site of cuff inflation. At 160 mmHg cuff inflation pressure (Upper Limb), arterial blood flow was successfully occluded during all occlusions in five of six volunteers. At an inflation pressure of 180 mmHg in the upper limb, arterial blood flow was occluded in all three cuff inflations and in all individuals (Fig. 2).


Characterization of acute ischemia-related physiological responses associated with remote ischemic preconditioning: a randomized controlled, crossover human study.

Sharma V, Cunniffe B, Verma AP, Cardinale M, Yellon D - Physiol Rep (2014)

Illustration of the fraction of the total number volunteers (n =6) in whom arterial blood flow was occluded (shown in black) at each cuff inflation pressure per limb. (A) 140 mmHg (UL); (B) 160 mmHg (UL); (C) 180 mmHg (UL); (D) 140 mmHg (LL); (E) 160 mmHg (LL); (F) 180 mmHg (LL); UL, upper limb, LL, lower limb.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4255807&req=5

fig02: Illustration of the fraction of the total number volunteers (n =6) in whom arterial blood flow was occluded (shown in black) at each cuff inflation pressure per limb. (A) 140 mmHg (UL); (B) 160 mmHg (UL); (C) 180 mmHg (UL); (D) 140 mmHg (LL); (E) 160 mmHg (LL); (F) 180 mmHg (LL); UL, upper limb, LL, lower limb.
Mentions: Cuff inflation pressure of 140 mmHg (Upper limb), caused a cessation of pulsatile arterial blood flow in three of six volunteers during all three RIPC cycles. This was identified through the loss of Doppler signal in the radial artery in the corresponding limb, distal to the site of cuff inflation. At 160 mmHg cuff inflation pressure (Upper Limb), arterial blood flow was successfully occluded during all occlusions in five of six volunteers. At an inflation pressure of 180 mmHg in the upper limb, arterial blood flow was occluded in all three cuff inflations and in all individuals (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: There is little evidence to support what limb (upper or lower) or cuff inflation pressures are most effective to deliver this intervention without causing undue discomfort/pain in nonanesthetized humans.Physiological changes in the occluded limb and any pain/discomfort associated with RIPC with each cuff inflation pressure were determined.However, whether benefits of RIPC can also be derived with protocols delivered to the upper limb using lower cuff inflation pressures and with lesser discomfort compared to the lower limb, remains to be investigated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Hatter Cardiovascular Institute, UCL, London, UK Department of Internal Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus