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Ubiquinol decreases hemorrhagic shock/resuscitation-induced microvascular inflammation in rat mesenteric microcirculation.

Shen Q, Holloway N, Thimmesch A, Wood JG, Clancy RL, Pierce JD - Physiol Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: In addition, vascular permeability in the control group (0.54 ± 0.11) was significantly greater than the ubiquinol group (0.34 ± 0.04).In conclusion, ubiquinol attenuates HS and FR-induced microvascular inflammation.These results suggest that ubiquinol provides protection to mesenteric microcirculation through its antioxidant properties.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Nursing, University of Kansas, Kansas City, Kansas, USA (Q.S., A.T., J.D.P.).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Vascular permeability in the control (n = 6) and ubiquinol (n = 6) groups following hemorrhagic shock (HS) and fluid resuscitation (FR). The vascular permeability index is the ratio of extra‐ and intravascular FITC‐albumin fluorescence intensity. †Significantly different from baseline (P <0.05). *Significantly different from the control group (P <0.01).
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fig03: Vascular permeability in the control (n = 6) and ubiquinol (n = 6) groups following hemorrhagic shock (HS) and fluid resuscitation (FR). The vascular permeability index is the ratio of extra‐ and intravascular FITC‐albumin fluorescence intensity. †Significantly different from baseline (P <0.05). *Significantly different from the control group (P <0.01).

Mentions: Figure 3 summarizes vascular permeability index, which was calculated as the ratio of extravascular to the intravascular FITC‐albumin fluorescence intensity. The greater the vascular permeability to FITC‐albumin, the higher is the vascular permeability index. At baseline, the vascular permeability indexes in both the control and ubiquinol groups were similar and relatively low (0.05 ± 0.02 vs. 0.09 ± 0.01, respectively, P >0.05). After 1 h of HS, the vascular permeability index increased to 0.17 ± 0.06 in the control group and 0.15 ± 0.02 in the ubiquinol group, respectively, indicating an increase in vascular permeability. The differences in vascular permeability index between the control and ubiquinol groups at HS were not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Similar results were observed at 1 h after FR in both the control and ubiquinol groups as the vascular permeability indexes continued to increase significantly relative to baseline (0.36 ± 0.08 vs. 0.38 ± 0.09, respectively). Compared to baseline, the vascular permeability index in the control group increased more than 10 times at 2 h after FR (0.54 ± 0.05 vs. 0.05 ± 0.02, P <0.01). Administration of ubiquinol prior to FR significantly reduced the increase in vascular permeability at 2 h after FR to 0.34 ± 0.02, which was significantly less than the control group (0.54 ± 0.05) (P <0.01).


Ubiquinol decreases hemorrhagic shock/resuscitation-induced microvascular inflammation in rat mesenteric microcirculation.

Shen Q, Holloway N, Thimmesch A, Wood JG, Clancy RL, Pierce JD - Physiol Rep (2014)

Vascular permeability in the control (n = 6) and ubiquinol (n = 6) groups following hemorrhagic shock (HS) and fluid resuscitation (FR). The vascular permeability index is the ratio of extra‐ and intravascular FITC‐albumin fluorescence intensity. †Significantly different from baseline (P <0.05). *Significantly different from the control group (P <0.01).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4255806&req=5

fig03: Vascular permeability in the control (n = 6) and ubiquinol (n = 6) groups following hemorrhagic shock (HS) and fluid resuscitation (FR). The vascular permeability index is the ratio of extra‐ and intravascular FITC‐albumin fluorescence intensity. †Significantly different from baseline (P <0.05). *Significantly different from the control group (P <0.01).
Mentions: Figure 3 summarizes vascular permeability index, which was calculated as the ratio of extravascular to the intravascular FITC‐albumin fluorescence intensity. The greater the vascular permeability to FITC‐albumin, the higher is the vascular permeability index. At baseline, the vascular permeability indexes in both the control and ubiquinol groups were similar and relatively low (0.05 ± 0.02 vs. 0.09 ± 0.01, respectively, P >0.05). After 1 h of HS, the vascular permeability index increased to 0.17 ± 0.06 in the control group and 0.15 ± 0.02 in the ubiquinol group, respectively, indicating an increase in vascular permeability. The differences in vascular permeability index between the control and ubiquinol groups at HS were not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Similar results were observed at 1 h after FR in both the control and ubiquinol groups as the vascular permeability indexes continued to increase significantly relative to baseline (0.36 ± 0.08 vs. 0.38 ± 0.09, respectively). Compared to baseline, the vascular permeability index in the control group increased more than 10 times at 2 h after FR (0.54 ± 0.05 vs. 0.05 ± 0.02, P <0.01). Administration of ubiquinol prior to FR significantly reduced the increase in vascular permeability at 2 h after FR to 0.34 ± 0.02, which was significantly less than the control group (0.54 ± 0.05) (P <0.01).

Bottom Line: In addition, vascular permeability in the control group (0.54 ± 0.11) was significantly greater than the ubiquinol group (0.34 ± 0.04).In conclusion, ubiquinol attenuates HS and FR-induced microvascular inflammation.These results suggest that ubiquinol provides protection to mesenteric microcirculation through its antioxidant properties.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Nursing, University of Kansas, Kansas City, Kansas, USA (Q.S., A.T., J.D.P.).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus