Limits...
Development of a genetic sexing strain in Bactrocera carambolae (Diptera: Tephritidae) by introgression of sex sorting components from B. dorsalis, Salaya1 strain.

Isasawin S, Aketarawong N, Lertsiri S, Thanaphum S - BMC Genet. (2014)

Bottom Line: This fruit fly belongs to Bactrocera dorsalis species complex.Further experiments showed that the sterile males of Salaya5 can compete with wild males for mating with wild females in field cage conditions.In addition, mating competitiveness tests suggested that Salaya5 has a potential to be used in B. carambolae SIT programs based on male-only releases.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: The carambola fruit fly, Bactrocera carambolae Drew & Hancock is a high profile key pest that is widely distributed in the southwestern ASEAN region. In addition, it has trans-continentally invaded Suriname, where it has been expanding east and southward since 1975. This fruit fly belongs to Bactrocera dorsalis species complex. The development and application of a genetic sexing strain (Salaya1) of B. dorsalis sensu stricto (s.s.) (Hendel) for the sterile insect technique (SIT) has improved the fruit fly control. However, matings between B. dorsalis s.s. and B. carambolae are incompatible, which hinder the application of the Salaya1 strain to control the carambola fruit fly. To solve this problem, we introduced genetic sexing components from the Salaya1 strain into the B. carambolae genome by interspecific hybridization.

Results: Morphological characteristics, mating competitiveness, male pheromone profiles, and genetic relationships revealed consistencies that helped to distinguish Salaya1 and B. carambolae strains. A Y-autosome translocation linking the dominant wild-type allele of white pupae gene and a free autosome carrying a recessive white pupae homologue from the Salaya1 strain were introgressed into the gene pool of B. carambolae. A panel of Y-pseudo-linked microsatellite loci of the Salaya1 strain served as markers for the introgression experiments. This resulted in a newly derived genetic sexing strain called Salaya5, with morphological characteristics corresponding to B. carambolae. The rectal gland pheromone profile of Salaya5 males also contained a distinctive component of B. carambolae. Microsatellite DNA analyses confirmed the close genetic relationships between the Salaya5 strain and wild B. carambolae populations. Further experiments showed that the sterile males of Salaya5 can compete with wild males for mating with wild females in field cage conditions.

Conclusions: Introgression of sex sorting components from the Salaya1 strain to a closely related B. carambolae strain generated a new genetic sexing strain, Salaya5. Morphology-based taxonomic characteristics, distinctive pheromone components, microsatellite DNA markers, genetic relationships, and mating competitiveness provided parental baseline data and validation tools for the new strain. The Salaya5 strain shows a close similarity with those features in the wild B. carambolae strain. In addition, mating competitiveness tests suggested that Salaya5 has a potential to be used in B. carambolae SIT programs based on male-only releases.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Three-dimension plot of Principle Coordinate Analysis (PCoA) and STRUCTURE analyses. The planes of the first three principle coordinates 62.31%, 33.82%, and 3.87% of total genetic variation, respectively, derived from five variable microsatellite loci (A). The planes of the first three principle coordinates 47.08%, 28.78%, and 15.18% of total genetic variation, respectively, derived from four Y-pseudo-linked microsatellite loci (B). The pie graph represents average membership distribution to three (A) and two (B) clusters, respectively. 1, B. dorsalis Salaya1 strain; 2, B. dorsalis wild strain; 3, B. carambolae Salaya5 strain; 4, B. carambolae Jakarta strain; 5, B. carambolae Sumatra strain.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4255791&req=5

Figure 5: Three-dimension plot of Principle Coordinate Analysis (PCoA) and STRUCTURE analyses. The planes of the first three principle coordinates 62.31%, 33.82%, and 3.87% of total genetic variation, respectively, derived from five variable microsatellite loci (A). The planes of the first three principle coordinates 47.08%, 28.78%, and 15.18% of total genetic variation, respectively, derived from four Y-pseudo-linked microsatellite loci (B). The pie graph represents average membership distribution to three (A) and two (B) clusters, respectively. 1, B. dorsalis Salaya1 strain; 2, B. dorsalis wild strain; 3, B. carambolae Salaya5 strain; 4, B. carambolae Jakarta strain; 5, B. carambolae Sumatra strain.

Mentions: Principle Coordinate Analysis (PCoA) derived from two different sets of microsatellite markers illustrates the genetic divergence of wild fruit fly populations and genetic sexing strains (Figure 5). Using five polymorphic microsatellite loci (Figure 5A), the first axis accounts for 62.31% of total variation and can distinguish two species (B. dorsalis and B. carambolae). The second (33.82% of total variation) mainly separates Salaya1 from wild B. dorsalis population, but still groups Salaya5 strain to B. carambolae Jakarta strain (the original strain) (Figure 5A). On the other hand, using other four Y-pseudo-linked microsatellite loci (Figure 5B), the first axis (47.08% of total variation) separates genetic sexing strains (Salaya1 and Salaya5) from the wild populations. The second axis, accounting for 28.78% of total variation, divides B. dorsalis from B. carambolae.


Development of a genetic sexing strain in Bactrocera carambolae (Diptera: Tephritidae) by introgression of sex sorting components from B. dorsalis, Salaya1 strain.

Isasawin S, Aketarawong N, Lertsiri S, Thanaphum S - BMC Genet. (2014)

Three-dimension plot of Principle Coordinate Analysis (PCoA) and STRUCTURE analyses. The planes of the first three principle coordinates 62.31%, 33.82%, and 3.87% of total genetic variation, respectively, derived from five variable microsatellite loci (A). The planes of the first three principle coordinates 47.08%, 28.78%, and 15.18% of total genetic variation, respectively, derived from four Y-pseudo-linked microsatellite loci (B). The pie graph represents average membership distribution to three (A) and two (B) clusters, respectively. 1, B. dorsalis Salaya1 strain; 2, B. dorsalis wild strain; 3, B. carambolae Salaya5 strain; 4, B. carambolae Jakarta strain; 5, B. carambolae Sumatra strain.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4255791&req=5

Figure 5: Three-dimension plot of Principle Coordinate Analysis (PCoA) and STRUCTURE analyses. The planes of the first three principle coordinates 62.31%, 33.82%, and 3.87% of total genetic variation, respectively, derived from five variable microsatellite loci (A). The planes of the first three principle coordinates 47.08%, 28.78%, and 15.18% of total genetic variation, respectively, derived from four Y-pseudo-linked microsatellite loci (B). The pie graph represents average membership distribution to three (A) and two (B) clusters, respectively. 1, B. dorsalis Salaya1 strain; 2, B. dorsalis wild strain; 3, B. carambolae Salaya5 strain; 4, B. carambolae Jakarta strain; 5, B. carambolae Sumatra strain.
Mentions: Principle Coordinate Analysis (PCoA) derived from two different sets of microsatellite markers illustrates the genetic divergence of wild fruit fly populations and genetic sexing strains (Figure 5). Using five polymorphic microsatellite loci (Figure 5A), the first axis accounts for 62.31% of total variation and can distinguish two species (B. dorsalis and B. carambolae). The second (33.82% of total variation) mainly separates Salaya1 from wild B. dorsalis population, but still groups Salaya5 strain to B. carambolae Jakarta strain (the original strain) (Figure 5A). On the other hand, using other four Y-pseudo-linked microsatellite loci (Figure 5B), the first axis (47.08% of total variation) separates genetic sexing strains (Salaya1 and Salaya5) from the wild populations. The second axis, accounting for 28.78% of total variation, divides B. dorsalis from B. carambolae.

Bottom Line: This fruit fly belongs to Bactrocera dorsalis species complex.Further experiments showed that the sterile males of Salaya5 can compete with wild males for mating with wild females in field cage conditions.In addition, mating competitiveness tests suggested that Salaya5 has a potential to be used in B. carambolae SIT programs based on male-only releases.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: The carambola fruit fly, Bactrocera carambolae Drew & Hancock is a high profile key pest that is widely distributed in the southwestern ASEAN region. In addition, it has trans-continentally invaded Suriname, where it has been expanding east and southward since 1975. This fruit fly belongs to Bactrocera dorsalis species complex. The development and application of a genetic sexing strain (Salaya1) of B. dorsalis sensu stricto (s.s.) (Hendel) for the sterile insect technique (SIT) has improved the fruit fly control. However, matings between B. dorsalis s.s. and B. carambolae are incompatible, which hinder the application of the Salaya1 strain to control the carambola fruit fly. To solve this problem, we introduced genetic sexing components from the Salaya1 strain into the B. carambolae genome by interspecific hybridization.

Results: Morphological characteristics, mating competitiveness, male pheromone profiles, and genetic relationships revealed consistencies that helped to distinguish Salaya1 and B. carambolae strains. A Y-autosome translocation linking the dominant wild-type allele of white pupae gene and a free autosome carrying a recessive white pupae homologue from the Salaya1 strain were introgressed into the gene pool of B. carambolae. A panel of Y-pseudo-linked microsatellite loci of the Salaya1 strain served as markers for the introgression experiments. This resulted in a newly derived genetic sexing strain called Salaya5, with morphological characteristics corresponding to B. carambolae. The rectal gland pheromone profile of Salaya5 males also contained a distinctive component of B. carambolae. Microsatellite DNA analyses confirmed the close genetic relationships between the Salaya5 strain and wild B. carambolae populations. Further experiments showed that the sterile males of Salaya5 can compete with wild males for mating with wild females in field cage conditions.

Conclusions: Introgression of sex sorting components from the Salaya1 strain to a closely related B. carambolae strain generated a new genetic sexing strain, Salaya5. Morphology-based taxonomic characteristics, distinctive pheromone components, microsatellite DNA markers, genetic relationships, and mating competitiveness provided parental baseline data and validation tools for the new strain. The Salaya5 strain shows a close similarity with those features in the wild B. carambolae strain. In addition, mating competitiveness tests suggested that Salaya5 has a potential to be used in B. carambolae SIT programs based on male-only releases.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus