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Dynamics of genetic variability in Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera: Tephritidae) during adaptation to laboratory rearing conditions.

Parreño MA, Scannapieco AC, Remis MI, Juri M, Vera MT, Segura DF, Cladera JL, Lanzavecchia SB - BMC Genet. (2014)

Bottom Line: A better understanding of the genetic variability during the introduction and adaptation of wild A. fraterculus populations to laboratory conditions is required for the development of stable and vigorous experimental colonies and mass-reared strains in support of successful Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) efforts.In CL, the relatively high values of genetic variability appear to be maintained across generations and could denote an intrinsic capacity to avoid the loss of genetic diversity in time.The impact of evolutionary forces on this species during the adaptation process as well as the best approach to choose strategies to introduce experimental and mass-reared A. fraterculus strains for SIT programs are discussed.

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ABSTRACT

Background: Anastrepha fraterculus is one of the most important fruit fly plagues in the American continent and only chemical control is applied in the field to diminish its population densities. A better understanding of the genetic variability during the introduction and adaptation of wild A. fraterculus populations to laboratory conditions is required for the development of stable and vigorous experimental colonies and mass-reared strains in support of successful Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) efforts.

Methods: The present study aims to analyze the dynamics of changes in genetic variability during the first six generations under artificial rearing conditions in two populations: a) a wild population recently introduced to laboratory culture, named TW and, b) a long-established control line, named CL.

Results: Results showed a declining tendency of genetic variability in TW. In CL, the relatively high values of genetic variability appear to be maintained across generations and could denote an intrinsic capacity to avoid the loss of genetic diversity in time.

Discussion: The impact of evolutionary forces on this species during the adaptation process as well as the best approach to choose strategies to introduce experimental and mass-reared A. fraterculus strains for SIT programs are discussed.

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Heterozygosity ratios (Ln RH) between generations n and n+6 for CL (A) and TW (B) populations. Dashed lines represent the 95% confidence interval of the normal distribution. Positive and negative Ln RH values denote an increase or a decrease in variability through time, respectively.
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Figure 2: Heterozygosity ratios (Ln RH) between generations n and n+6 for CL (A) and TW (B) populations. Dashed lines represent the 95% confidence interval of the normal distribution. Positive and negative Ln RH values denote an increase or a decrease in variability through time, respectively.

Mentions: Figure 2 shows the results obtained for the Ln RH test applied to detect deviations from neutrality in our microsatellite data set. No microsatellite locus exhibited any consistent indication of positive selection, except for locus A112 in R1 TW, whose Ln RH value fell slightly outside the 95% limits of the normal distribution. This locus showed a decrease in variability through generations in this TW replicate (Figure 2).


Dynamics of genetic variability in Anastrepha fraterculus (Diptera: Tephritidae) during adaptation to laboratory rearing conditions.

Parreño MA, Scannapieco AC, Remis MI, Juri M, Vera MT, Segura DF, Cladera JL, Lanzavecchia SB - BMC Genet. (2014)

Heterozygosity ratios (Ln RH) between generations n and n+6 for CL (A) and TW (B) populations. Dashed lines represent the 95% confidence interval of the normal distribution. Positive and negative Ln RH values denote an increase or a decrease in variability through time, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4255785&req=5

Figure 2: Heterozygosity ratios (Ln RH) between generations n and n+6 for CL (A) and TW (B) populations. Dashed lines represent the 95% confidence interval of the normal distribution. Positive and negative Ln RH values denote an increase or a decrease in variability through time, respectively.
Mentions: Figure 2 shows the results obtained for the Ln RH test applied to detect deviations from neutrality in our microsatellite data set. No microsatellite locus exhibited any consistent indication of positive selection, except for locus A112 in R1 TW, whose Ln RH value fell slightly outside the 95% limits of the normal distribution. This locus showed a decrease in variability through generations in this TW replicate (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: A better understanding of the genetic variability during the introduction and adaptation of wild A. fraterculus populations to laboratory conditions is required for the development of stable and vigorous experimental colonies and mass-reared strains in support of successful Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) efforts.In CL, the relatively high values of genetic variability appear to be maintained across generations and could denote an intrinsic capacity to avoid the loss of genetic diversity in time.The impact of evolutionary forces on this species during the adaptation process as well as the best approach to choose strategies to introduce experimental and mass-reared A. fraterculus strains for SIT programs are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Anastrepha fraterculus is one of the most important fruit fly plagues in the American continent and only chemical control is applied in the field to diminish its population densities. A better understanding of the genetic variability during the introduction and adaptation of wild A. fraterculus populations to laboratory conditions is required for the development of stable and vigorous experimental colonies and mass-reared strains in support of successful Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) efforts.

Methods: The present study aims to analyze the dynamics of changes in genetic variability during the first six generations under artificial rearing conditions in two populations: a) a wild population recently introduced to laboratory culture, named TW and, b) a long-established control line, named CL.

Results: Results showed a declining tendency of genetic variability in TW. In CL, the relatively high values of genetic variability appear to be maintained across generations and could denote an intrinsic capacity to avoid the loss of genetic diversity in time.

Discussion: The impact of evolutionary forces on this species during the adaptation process as well as the best approach to choose strategies to introduce experimental and mass-reared A. fraterculus strains for SIT programs are discussed.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus