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Genetics and biology of Anastrepha fraterculus: research supporting the use of the sterile insect technique (SIT) to control this pest in Argentina.

Cladera JL, Vilardi JC, Juri M, Paulin LE, Giardini MC, Gómez Cendra PV, Segura DF, Lanzavecchia SB - BMC Genet. (2014)

Bottom Line: In recent years, research groups have been building a network in Argentina in order to address particular aspects of the development of the SIT for Anastrepha fraterculus.The problems being addressed by these groups include improvement of artificial diets, facilitation of insect mass rearing, radiation doses and conditions for insect sterilisation, basic knowledge supporting the development of males-only strains, reduction of male maturation time to facilitate releases, identification and isolation of chemical communication signals, and a good deal of population genetic studies.This paper is the product of a concerted effort to gather all this knowledge scattered in numerous and often hard-to-access reports and papers and summarize their basic conclusions in a single publication.

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ABSTRACT
Two species of true fruit flies (taxonomic family Tephritidae) are considered pests of fruit and vegetable production in Argentina: the cosmopolitan Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata Wiedemann) and the new world South American fruit fly (Anastrepha fraterculus Wiedemann). The distribution of these two species in Argentina overlaps north of the capital, Buenos Aires. Regarding the control of these two pests, the varied geographical fruit producing regions in Argentina are in different fly control situations. One part is under a programme using the sterile insect technique (SIT) for the eradication of C. capitata, because A. fraterculus is not present in this area. The application of the SIT to control C. capitata north of the present line with the possibility of A. fraterculus occupying the niche left vacant by C. capitata becomes a cause of much concern. Only initial steps have been taken to investigate the genetics and biology of A. fraterculus. Consequently, only fragmentary information has been recorded in the literature regarding the use of SIT to control this species. For these reasons, the research to develop a SIT protocol to control A. fraterculus is greatly needed. In recent years, research groups have been building a network in Argentina in order to address particular aspects of the development of the SIT for Anastrepha fraterculus. The problems being addressed by these groups include improvement of artificial diets, facilitation of insect mass rearing, radiation doses and conditions for insect sterilisation, basic knowledge supporting the development of males-only strains, reduction of male maturation time to facilitate releases, identification and isolation of chemical communication signals, and a good deal of population genetic studies. This paper is the product of a concerted effort to gather all this knowledge scattered in numerous and often hard-to-access reports and papers and summarize their basic conclusions in a single publication.

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Female A. fraterculus. Approaching a male in an attempt to copulate (dot of color paint on the thorax for identification of flies in a caged tree)
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Figure 2: Female A. fraterculus. Approaching a male in an attempt to copulate (dot of color paint on the thorax for identification of flies in a caged tree)

Mentions: Sexual success: In the SIT the external morphology may be relevant to the mating success of released sterile males. Sciurano et al. [75] compared the multivariate phenotype between successful and unsuccessful males competing to copulate in caged trees ( see Figure 2). Specific traits, such as wing width and thorax length, were identified as most probable targets of sexual selection. Male mating success does not seem associated with size but rather to body shape. In fact, Segura et al. [63] found no relationship between body size and mating success or the ability of males to integrate into leks; however, the "face width" was found to be negatively associated to copula duration and positively associated with latency (the time between fly release into the cage and copulation), and the "eye length" was positively associated with copula duration and probability to mate. Artificial rearing may have a side effect on the multivariate phenotype of A. fraterculus. In general, lab flies are larger and show reduced variance in body size related traits compared to flies from the wild. Specifically, lab males have wider head, longer eye and narrower wing than wild males [5].


Genetics and biology of Anastrepha fraterculus: research supporting the use of the sterile insect technique (SIT) to control this pest in Argentina.

Cladera JL, Vilardi JC, Juri M, Paulin LE, Giardini MC, Gómez Cendra PV, Segura DF, Lanzavecchia SB - BMC Genet. (2014)

Female A. fraterculus. Approaching a male in an attempt to copulate (dot of color paint on the thorax for identification of flies in a caged tree)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4255781&req=5

Figure 2: Female A. fraterculus. Approaching a male in an attempt to copulate (dot of color paint on the thorax for identification of flies in a caged tree)
Mentions: Sexual success: In the SIT the external morphology may be relevant to the mating success of released sterile males. Sciurano et al. [75] compared the multivariate phenotype between successful and unsuccessful males competing to copulate in caged trees ( see Figure 2). Specific traits, such as wing width and thorax length, were identified as most probable targets of sexual selection. Male mating success does not seem associated with size but rather to body shape. In fact, Segura et al. [63] found no relationship between body size and mating success or the ability of males to integrate into leks; however, the "face width" was found to be negatively associated to copula duration and positively associated with latency (the time between fly release into the cage and copulation), and the "eye length" was positively associated with copula duration and probability to mate. Artificial rearing may have a side effect on the multivariate phenotype of A. fraterculus. In general, lab flies are larger and show reduced variance in body size related traits compared to flies from the wild. Specifically, lab males have wider head, longer eye and narrower wing than wild males [5].

Bottom Line: In recent years, research groups have been building a network in Argentina in order to address particular aspects of the development of the SIT for Anastrepha fraterculus.The problems being addressed by these groups include improvement of artificial diets, facilitation of insect mass rearing, radiation doses and conditions for insect sterilisation, basic knowledge supporting the development of males-only strains, reduction of male maturation time to facilitate releases, identification and isolation of chemical communication signals, and a good deal of population genetic studies.This paper is the product of a concerted effort to gather all this knowledge scattered in numerous and often hard-to-access reports and papers and summarize their basic conclusions in a single publication.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Two species of true fruit flies (taxonomic family Tephritidae) are considered pests of fruit and vegetable production in Argentina: the cosmopolitan Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata Wiedemann) and the new world South American fruit fly (Anastrepha fraterculus Wiedemann). The distribution of these two species in Argentina overlaps north of the capital, Buenos Aires. Regarding the control of these two pests, the varied geographical fruit producing regions in Argentina are in different fly control situations. One part is under a programme using the sterile insect technique (SIT) for the eradication of C. capitata, because A. fraterculus is not present in this area. The application of the SIT to control C. capitata north of the present line with the possibility of A. fraterculus occupying the niche left vacant by C. capitata becomes a cause of much concern. Only initial steps have been taken to investigate the genetics and biology of A. fraterculus. Consequently, only fragmentary information has been recorded in the literature regarding the use of SIT to control this species. For these reasons, the research to develop a SIT protocol to control A. fraterculus is greatly needed. In recent years, research groups have been building a network in Argentina in order to address particular aspects of the development of the SIT for Anastrepha fraterculus. The problems being addressed by these groups include improvement of artificial diets, facilitation of insect mass rearing, radiation doses and conditions for insect sterilisation, basic knowledge supporting the development of males-only strains, reduction of male maturation time to facilitate releases, identification and isolation of chemical communication signals, and a good deal of population genetic studies. This paper is the product of a concerted effort to gather all this knowledge scattered in numerous and often hard-to-access reports and papers and summarize their basic conclusions in a single publication.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus