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Comparative genomics and transcriptomics analyses reveal divergent lifestyle features of nematode endoparasitic fungus Hirsutella minnesotensis.

Lai Y, Liu K, Zhang X, Zhang X, Li K, Wang N, Shu C, Wu Y, Wang C, Bushley KE, Xiang M, Liu X - Genome Biol Evol (2014)

Bottom Line: Its genome was de novo sequenced and compared with five entomopathogenic fungi in the Hypocreales and three nematode-trapping fungi in the Orbiliales (Ascomycota).Those results indicate that H. minnesotensis has evolved different mechanism for nematode endoparasitism compared with nematode-trapping fungi.Genome and transcriptome analyses provided comprehensive understanding of the evolution and lifestyle of nematode endoparasitism.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Mycology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.

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Genomic landscape of selected scaffolds containing secondary metabolite gene clusters in Hirsutella minnesotensis. (A) Gene clusters located in TE-poor regions are syntenic between H. minnesotensis and other insect fungi. (B) Gene clusters located in TE-rich regions are expanded and diverse without synteny.
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evu241-F4: Genomic landscape of selected scaffolds containing secondary metabolite gene clusters in Hirsutella minnesotensis. (A) Gene clusters located in TE-poor regions are syntenic between H. minnesotensis and other insect fungi. (B) Gene clusters located in TE-rich regions are expanded and diverse without synteny.

Mentions: The core genes for secondary metabolite production in fungal genomes are typically located in clusters with other accessory genes, such as those encoding dehydrogenases, methyltransferases, acetyl transferases, prenyltransferases, oxidoreductases, and cytochrome P450s (Gao et al. 2011). In total, 94 secondary metabolite gene clusters were identified in H. minnesotensis genome. Although most PKS and NRPS genes are orthologous across the nematophagous fungi and insect fungi, the accessory genes in the secondary metabolite gene clusters are more dynamic. Only five secondary metabolism gene clusters are shared between H. minnesotensis and other insect pathogens with limited synteny (fig. 4A). This cluster diversity seems to have resulted from gene duplication or loss related to TEs associated with the secondary metabolism gene clusters (fig. 4B). Thirty-two of 94 gene clusters in H. minnesotensis are located in TE-rich regions (>60% TE).Fig. 4.—


Comparative genomics and transcriptomics analyses reveal divergent lifestyle features of nematode endoparasitic fungus Hirsutella minnesotensis.

Lai Y, Liu K, Zhang X, Zhang X, Li K, Wang N, Shu C, Wu Y, Wang C, Bushley KE, Xiang M, Liu X - Genome Biol Evol (2014)

Genomic landscape of selected scaffolds containing secondary metabolite gene clusters in Hirsutella minnesotensis. (A) Gene clusters located in TE-poor regions are syntenic between H. minnesotensis and other insect fungi. (B) Gene clusters located in TE-rich regions are expanded and diverse without synteny.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4255773&req=5

evu241-F4: Genomic landscape of selected scaffolds containing secondary metabolite gene clusters in Hirsutella minnesotensis. (A) Gene clusters located in TE-poor regions are syntenic between H. minnesotensis and other insect fungi. (B) Gene clusters located in TE-rich regions are expanded and diverse without synteny.
Mentions: The core genes for secondary metabolite production in fungal genomes are typically located in clusters with other accessory genes, such as those encoding dehydrogenases, methyltransferases, acetyl transferases, prenyltransferases, oxidoreductases, and cytochrome P450s (Gao et al. 2011). In total, 94 secondary metabolite gene clusters were identified in H. minnesotensis genome. Although most PKS and NRPS genes are orthologous across the nematophagous fungi and insect fungi, the accessory genes in the secondary metabolite gene clusters are more dynamic. Only five secondary metabolism gene clusters are shared between H. minnesotensis and other insect pathogens with limited synteny (fig. 4A). This cluster diversity seems to have resulted from gene duplication or loss related to TEs associated with the secondary metabolism gene clusters (fig. 4B). Thirty-two of 94 gene clusters in H. minnesotensis are located in TE-rich regions (>60% TE).Fig. 4.—

Bottom Line: Its genome was de novo sequenced and compared with five entomopathogenic fungi in the Hypocreales and three nematode-trapping fungi in the Orbiliales (Ascomycota).Those results indicate that H. minnesotensis has evolved different mechanism for nematode endoparasitism compared with nematode-trapping fungi.Genome and transcriptome analyses provided comprehensive understanding of the evolution and lifestyle of nematode endoparasitism.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Mycology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus