Limits...
Endovascular repair of aortic dissection and intramural hematoma: indications and serial changes.

Sueyoshi E, Onitsuka H, Nagayama H, Sakamoto I, Uetani M - Springerplus (2014)

Bottom Line: It can be fatal if not promptly diagnosed and treated.Intramural hematoma (IMH) of the aorta is recognized as distinct from classic (double-barreled) AD.IMH also frequently leads to aortic emergency, which can be fatal unless rapidly diagnosed and treated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, 1-7-1 Sakamoto, Nagasaki, 852-8501 Japan.

ABSTRACT
Thoracic aortic dissection (AD) is one of the most common aortic emergencies. It can be fatal if not promptly diagnosed and treated. Intramural hematoma (IMH) of the aorta is recognized as distinct from classic (double-barreled) AD. IMH also frequently leads to aortic emergency, which can be fatal unless rapidly diagnosed and treated. Recently, thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has been used for the treatment of complications caused by AD. TEVAR is also a viable option for the treatment of complicated IHM. In this article, we review the details of TEVAR as treatment options for AD and IMH, including the indications for TEVAR, imaging, and follow-up.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A 72-year-old male with type B acute AD. A. One month after onset, contrast-enhanced CT image shows progressive dilatation of the false lumen. B. Aortography shows the entry in the descending aorta (arrow). TEVAR (GORE TAG: 34-mm diameter & 20-cm length) was conducted to close the entry. C. One week after endovascular treatment, CT image shows thrombosed false lumen. D. Two months after endovascular treatment, contrast-enhanced CT image shows that the false lumen has markedly decreased.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4252497&req=5

Fig1: A 72-year-old male with type B acute AD. A. One month after onset, contrast-enhanced CT image shows progressive dilatation of the false lumen. B. Aortography shows the entry in the descending aorta (arrow). TEVAR (GORE TAG: 34-mm diameter & 20-cm length) was conducted to close the entry. C. One week after endovascular treatment, CT image shows thrombosed false lumen. D. Two months after endovascular treatment, contrast-enhanced CT image shows that the false lumen has markedly decreased.

Mentions: Covering the entry site in acute AD may lead to the total regression of the false lumen, and so few additional complete therapeutic procedures may be required (Figure 1). Alternatively, in chronic AD, the false lumen may be partially thrombosed and the intima is more rigid, and so exclusion of the flow into the false lumen causes thrombosis and partial false lumen shrinkage (Garzon et al.2005) (Figure 2).Figure 1


Endovascular repair of aortic dissection and intramural hematoma: indications and serial changes.

Sueyoshi E, Onitsuka H, Nagayama H, Sakamoto I, Uetani M - Springerplus (2014)

A 72-year-old male with type B acute AD. A. One month after onset, contrast-enhanced CT image shows progressive dilatation of the false lumen. B. Aortography shows the entry in the descending aorta (arrow). TEVAR (GORE TAG: 34-mm diameter & 20-cm length) was conducted to close the entry. C. One week after endovascular treatment, CT image shows thrombosed false lumen. D. Two months after endovascular treatment, contrast-enhanced CT image shows that the false lumen has markedly decreased.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4252497&req=5

Fig1: A 72-year-old male with type B acute AD. A. One month after onset, contrast-enhanced CT image shows progressive dilatation of the false lumen. B. Aortography shows the entry in the descending aorta (arrow). TEVAR (GORE TAG: 34-mm diameter & 20-cm length) was conducted to close the entry. C. One week after endovascular treatment, CT image shows thrombosed false lumen. D. Two months after endovascular treatment, contrast-enhanced CT image shows that the false lumen has markedly decreased.
Mentions: Covering the entry site in acute AD may lead to the total regression of the false lumen, and so few additional complete therapeutic procedures may be required (Figure 1). Alternatively, in chronic AD, the false lumen may be partially thrombosed and the intima is more rigid, and so exclusion of the flow into the false lumen causes thrombosis and partial false lumen shrinkage (Garzon et al.2005) (Figure 2).Figure 1

Bottom Line: It can be fatal if not promptly diagnosed and treated.Intramural hematoma (IMH) of the aorta is recognized as distinct from classic (double-barreled) AD.IMH also frequently leads to aortic emergency, which can be fatal unless rapidly diagnosed and treated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, 1-7-1 Sakamoto, Nagasaki, 852-8501 Japan.

ABSTRACT
Thoracic aortic dissection (AD) is one of the most common aortic emergencies. It can be fatal if not promptly diagnosed and treated. Intramural hematoma (IMH) of the aorta is recognized as distinct from classic (double-barreled) AD. IMH also frequently leads to aortic emergency, which can be fatal unless rapidly diagnosed and treated. Recently, thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has been used for the treatment of complications caused by AD. TEVAR is also a viable option for the treatment of complicated IHM. In this article, we review the details of TEVAR as treatment options for AD and IMH, including the indications for TEVAR, imaging, and follow-up.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus