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Skip areas of retained melanin: a clue to the histopathological diagnosis of idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis.

Joshi R - Indian J Dermatol (2014)

Bottom Line: The epidermis had markedly decreased to absent melanin in the basal layer and reduced numbers of melanocytes at the dermoepidermal junction.One-third of patients had a sparse perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate, whereas the rest had no significant dermal inflammation.This finding has not been reported earlier and appears to be quite specific to IGH and may be used as a clue to differentiate IGH from other similar conditions such as vitiligo and guttate morphea.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, P. D. Hinduja Hospital, Mahim, Mumbai, India.

ABSTRACT
Biopsy findings in 55 cases of idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis (IGH) are reported. Most cases had a flat epidermis with loss of the rete pattern and a thickened orthokeratotic basket weave stratum corneum. The epidermis had markedly decreased to absent melanin in the basal layer and reduced numbers of melanocytes at the dermoepidermal junction. One-third of patients had a sparse perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate, whereas the rest had no significant dermal inflammation. These findings are in concordance with current literature. However, small foci of retained melanin in the basal layer (skip areas) alternating with larger areas of melanin loss were present in almost 80% of cases. This finding has not been reported earlier and appears to be quite specific to IGH and may be used as a clue to differentiate IGH from other similar conditions such as vitiligo and guttate morphea.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Age distribution of patients with idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis
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Figure 1: Age distribution of patients with idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis

Mentions: This is a retrospective study of biopsy findings of 55 patients rendered a histopathological diagnosis of IGH. The age distribution of patients is presented in Figure 1. The sites of biopsy were mainly the leg (39), other sites were arm (1), hand (1), forearm (2), chest (2), abdomen (2), back (2), thigh (2), and foot (1). In three patients the site of biopsy was not mentioned.


Skip areas of retained melanin: a clue to the histopathological diagnosis of idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis.

Joshi R - Indian J Dermatol (2014)

Age distribution of patients with idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4248493&req=5

Figure 1: Age distribution of patients with idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis
Mentions: This is a retrospective study of biopsy findings of 55 patients rendered a histopathological diagnosis of IGH. The age distribution of patients is presented in Figure 1. The sites of biopsy were mainly the leg (39), other sites were arm (1), hand (1), forearm (2), chest (2), abdomen (2), back (2), thigh (2), and foot (1). In three patients the site of biopsy was not mentioned.

Bottom Line: The epidermis had markedly decreased to absent melanin in the basal layer and reduced numbers of melanocytes at the dermoepidermal junction.One-third of patients had a sparse perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate, whereas the rest had no significant dermal inflammation.This finding has not been reported earlier and appears to be quite specific to IGH and may be used as a clue to differentiate IGH from other similar conditions such as vitiligo and guttate morphea.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, P. D. Hinduja Hospital, Mahim, Mumbai, India.

ABSTRACT
Biopsy findings in 55 cases of idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis (IGH) are reported. Most cases had a flat epidermis with loss of the rete pattern and a thickened orthokeratotic basket weave stratum corneum. The epidermis had markedly decreased to absent melanin in the basal layer and reduced numbers of melanocytes at the dermoepidermal junction. One-third of patients had a sparse perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate, whereas the rest had no significant dermal inflammation. These findings are in concordance with current literature. However, small foci of retained melanin in the basal layer (skip areas) alternating with larger areas of melanin loss were present in almost 80% of cases. This finding has not been reported earlier and appears to be quite specific to IGH and may be used as a clue to differentiate IGH from other similar conditions such as vitiligo and guttate morphea.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus