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A clinical and statistical survey of cutaneous changes in the first 120 hours of life.

Sadana DJ, Sharma YK, Chaudhari ND, Dash K, Rizvi A, Jethani S - Indian J Dermatol (2014)

Bottom Line: Lanugo and napkin dermatitis (ND) were statistically significant with respect to two neonatal factors and cradle cap (CC), a single maternal factor.Gestational age was of statistical significance regarding five cutaneous changes, associated maternal illness during pregnancy regarding four, birth weight as well as parity regarding three each, and sex of the neonate as well as mode of delivery regarding two each.Despite observing a statistically significant correlation of eight cutaneous changes with three maternal and/or three neonatal factors, more extensive studies in neonatal dermatology are required for validation of these unique statistical correlations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Leprology and Venereology, Dr. D.Y. Patil Medical College, Pimpri, Pune, Maharashtra, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: The spectrum of dermatological manifestations during neonatal period varies from transient self-limiting conditions to serious dermatoses; the latter, fortunately few, are disproportionately stressful to the parents, who due to lack of specialized pediatric dermatology clinics frequently get tossed between a dermatologist and a pediatrician.

Objectives: This study was formulated to record cutaneous changes over the first five postnatal days of life and to statistically correlate those changes occurring in ≥ 11 neonates with three (parity, associated illnesses, and mode of delivery) maternal and three (sex, birth weight, and gestational age) neonatal factors.

Methods: This descriptive, cross-sectional study at a tertiary care hospital entailed recording detailed dermatological examination of 300 neonates having some (physiological and/or pathological) cutaneous changes and their statistical evaluation using the Chi-square test and significance (P < 0.05) as above.

Results: Superficial cutaneous desquamation (SCD), Mongolian spots (MS), and erythema toxicum neonatorum (ETN) were the first three common changes among a total of 15 conditions observed overall; these three, as also milia and icterus, revealed statistical significance with both maternal as well as neonatal factors. Lanugo and napkin dermatitis (ND) were statistically significant with respect to two neonatal factors and cradle cap (CC), a single maternal factor. Gestational age was of statistical significance regarding five cutaneous changes, associated maternal illness during pregnancy regarding four, birth weight as well as parity regarding three each, and sex of the neonate as well as mode of delivery regarding two each.

Conclusion: Despite observing a statistically significant correlation of eight cutaneous changes with three maternal and/or three neonatal factors, more extensive studies in neonatal dermatology are required for validation of these unique statistical correlations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Milia
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Figure 4: Milia

Mentions: Occurrence of milia [Figure 4] in the previous similar studies has ranged from 1.4 to 93.1%.[358910111215] There was a statistically significant greater proportion (P = 0.001) of milia in neonates born at term (47; 70.2%) and having an NBW (40; 59.7%) in our study as also in two previous studies.[810] More (51; 76.2%) frequent (P = 0.001) occurrence of milia, as recorded in our study, in neonates born to multipara mothers was also observed in 67.9% of their study neonates by Zagne et al.[3] However, a statistically significant higher incidence (P < 0.05) of milia observed in our study (39; 58.2%) neonates whose mothers had some illness (fever 13 cases; hypertension 12 cases; diabetes four cases; anemia five cases; antepartum hemorrhage two cases; epilepsy two cases, and a single case of asthma) during pregnancy was not found reported previously.


A clinical and statistical survey of cutaneous changes in the first 120 hours of life.

Sadana DJ, Sharma YK, Chaudhari ND, Dash K, Rizvi A, Jethani S - Indian J Dermatol (2014)

Milia
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4248489&req=5

Figure 4: Milia
Mentions: Occurrence of milia [Figure 4] in the previous similar studies has ranged from 1.4 to 93.1%.[358910111215] There was a statistically significant greater proportion (P = 0.001) of milia in neonates born at term (47; 70.2%) and having an NBW (40; 59.7%) in our study as also in two previous studies.[810] More (51; 76.2%) frequent (P = 0.001) occurrence of milia, as recorded in our study, in neonates born to multipara mothers was also observed in 67.9% of their study neonates by Zagne et al.[3] However, a statistically significant higher incidence (P < 0.05) of milia observed in our study (39; 58.2%) neonates whose mothers had some illness (fever 13 cases; hypertension 12 cases; diabetes four cases; anemia five cases; antepartum hemorrhage two cases; epilepsy two cases, and a single case of asthma) during pregnancy was not found reported previously.

Bottom Line: Lanugo and napkin dermatitis (ND) were statistically significant with respect to two neonatal factors and cradle cap (CC), a single maternal factor.Gestational age was of statistical significance regarding five cutaneous changes, associated maternal illness during pregnancy regarding four, birth weight as well as parity regarding three each, and sex of the neonate as well as mode of delivery regarding two each.Despite observing a statistically significant correlation of eight cutaneous changes with three maternal and/or three neonatal factors, more extensive studies in neonatal dermatology are required for validation of these unique statistical correlations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Leprology and Venereology, Dr. D.Y. Patil Medical College, Pimpri, Pune, Maharashtra, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: The spectrum of dermatological manifestations during neonatal period varies from transient self-limiting conditions to serious dermatoses; the latter, fortunately few, are disproportionately stressful to the parents, who due to lack of specialized pediatric dermatology clinics frequently get tossed between a dermatologist and a pediatrician.

Objectives: This study was formulated to record cutaneous changes over the first five postnatal days of life and to statistically correlate those changes occurring in ≥ 11 neonates with three (parity, associated illnesses, and mode of delivery) maternal and three (sex, birth weight, and gestational age) neonatal factors.

Methods: This descriptive, cross-sectional study at a tertiary care hospital entailed recording detailed dermatological examination of 300 neonates having some (physiological and/or pathological) cutaneous changes and their statistical evaluation using the Chi-square test and significance (P < 0.05) as above.

Results: Superficial cutaneous desquamation (SCD), Mongolian spots (MS), and erythema toxicum neonatorum (ETN) were the first three common changes among a total of 15 conditions observed overall; these three, as also milia and icterus, revealed statistical significance with both maternal as well as neonatal factors. Lanugo and napkin dermatitis (ND) were statistically significant with respect to two neonatal factors and cradle cap (CC), a single maternal factor. Gestational age was of statistical significance regarding five cutaneous changes, associated maternal illness during pregnancy regarding four, birth weight as well as parity regarding three each, and sex of the neonate as well as mode of delivery regarding two each.

Conclusion: Despite observing a statistically significant correlation of eight cutaneous changes with three maternal and/or three neonatal factors, more extensive studies in neonatal dermatology are required for validation of these unique statistical correlations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus