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Male pelvic squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary origin.

Chiec L, Verma S, Kendler A, Abdel Karim N - Case Rep Oncol Med (2014)

Bottom Line: The patient was treated with concomitant chemoradiation, including cisplatin and intensity-modulated radiation therapy, followed by carboplatin and paclitaxel.The patient achieved partial remission, in which he remained one year after his presentation.Further studies are necessary to determine the most appropriate work-up, diagnosis, and optimal treatment strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267, USA.

ABSTRACT
Pelvic squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary origin has been described in several case reports of female patients. However, there have been no published reports describing male patients with pelvic squamous cell cancer of unknown primary origin. Our case describes a 52-year-old man who presented with right buttock pain, rectal urgency, and constipation. His physical examination demonstrated tenderness to palpation around his gluteal folds. Computed tomography scan of his abdomen and pelvis demonstrated a large mass in his retroperitoneum. The mass was determined to be squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary origin. Additionally, the patient had small nodules in his right lower lung lobe and right hepatic lobe. The patient was treated with concomitant chemoradiation, including cisplatin and intensity-modulated radiation therapy, followed by carboplatin and paclitaxel. The patient achieved partial remission, in which he remained one year after his presentation. Our case is consistent with the literature which suggests that squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary origin occurring outside of the head and neck region may have a more favorable prognosis than other carcinomas of unknown primary origin. Further studies are necessary to determine the most appropriate work-up, diagnosis, and optimal treatment strategies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Contrast-enhanced CT scan of the pelvis demonstrates a 3.4 × 1.7 cm pelvic lesion (arrows) with no substantial soft-tissue component. The lesion is linear and elongated and appears to be comprised mainly of necrotic tissue, consistent with postradiation changes.
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fig4: Contrast-enhanced CT scan of the pelvis demonstrates a 3.4 × 1.7 cm pelvic lesion (arrows) with no substantial soft-tissue component. The lesion is linear and elongated and appears to be comprised mainly of necrotic tissue, consistent with postradiation changes.

Mentions: Follow-up CT chest, abdomen, and pelvis at 12 months after diagnosis (8 months after beginning treatment) showed a continued interval decrease in size of the pelvic lesion to 3.4 × 1.7 cm (Figures 4(a) and 4(b)). The patient has thus achieved a partial remission per RECIST 1.1 criteria [5], with an overall 47% decrease in the size of the lesion. In addition, the total response may be underestimated given that the residual mass had a linear and elongated shape and consisted of mainly necrotic tissue. Liver and lung lesions remain stable.


Male pelvic squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary origin.

Chiec L, Verma S, Kendler A, Abdel Karim N - Case Rep Oncol Med (2014)

Contrast-enhanced CT scan of the pelvis demonstrates a 3.4 × 1.7 cm pelvic lesion (arrows) with no substantial soft-tissue component. The lesion is linear and elongated and appears to be comprised mainly of necrotic tissue, consistent with postradiation changes.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4247932&req=5

fig4: Contrast-enhanced CT scan of the pelvis demonstrates a 3.4 × 1.7 cm pelvic lesion (arrows) with no substantial soft-tissue component. The lesion is linear and elongated and appears to be comprised mainly of necrotic tissue, consistent with postradiation changes.
Mentions: Follow-up CT chest, abdomen, and pelvis at 12 months after diagnosis (8 months after beginning treatment) showed a continued interval decrease in size of the pelvic lesion to 3.4 × 1.7 cm (Figures 4(a) and 4(b)). The patient has thus achieved a partial remission per RECIST 1.1 criteria [5], with an overall 47% decrease in the size of the lesion. In addition, the total response may be underestimated given that the residual mass had a linear and elongated shape and consisted of mainly necrotic tissue. Liver and lung lesions remain stable.

Bottom Line: The patient was treated with concomitant chemoradiation, including cisplatin and intensity-modulated radiation therapy, followed by carboplatin and paclitaxel.The patient achieved partial remission, in which he remained one year after his presentation.Further studies are necessary to determine the most appropriate work-up, diagnosis, and optimal treatment strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267, USA.

ABSTRACT
Pelvic squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary origin has been described in several case reports of female patients. However, there have been no published reports describing male patients with pelvic squamous cell cancer of unknown primary origin. Our case describes a 52-year-old man who presented with right buttock pain, rectal urgency, and constipation. His physical examination demonstrated tenderness to palpation around his gluteal folds. Computed tomography scan of his abdomen and pelvis demonstrated a large mass in his retroperitoneum. The mass was determined to be squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary origin. Additionally, the patient had small nodules in his right lower lung lobe and right hepatic lobe. The patient was treated with concomitant chemoradiation, including cisplatin and intensity-modulated radiation therapy, followed by carboplatin and paclitaxel. The patient achieved partial remission, in which he remained one year after his presentation. Our case is consistent with the literature which suggests that squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary origin occurring outside of the head and neck region may have a more favorable prognosis than other carcinomas of unknown primary origin. Further studies are necessary to determine the most appropriate work-up, diagnosis, and optimal treatment strategies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus