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Distribution of anticoagulant rodenticide resistance in Rattus norvegicus in the Netherlands according to Vkorc1 mutations.

Meerburg BG, van Gent-Pelzer MP, Schoelitsz B, Esther A, van der Lee TA - Pest Manag. Sci. (2014)

Bottom Line: Here, the authors present the results of a survey in the Netherlands where tissue samples and droppings were tested using a newly developed TaqMan PCR test for genotypic variation at codon 139 in the Vkorc1 gene associated with anticoagulant rodenticide resistance.In addition, indications of a clear genetic substructure in the Netherlands were found.As rodenticides should keep their efficacy because they are a last resort in rodent management, more studies are urgently needed that link specific genetic mutations to the efficacy of active substances.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Wageningen UR Livestock Research, Lelystad, The Netherlands.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Overview of the questionnaire outcome among pest controllers (A) and the outcome of the analysis of tissue samples of R. norvegicus (B) presented on the map of Dutch postal codes (two digits). On map A, the dark-grey areas represent regions where the presence of resistant rats was suspected. On map B, in the dark-grey areas at least one mutation was discovered, based on tail tissue samples, while in the light-grey areas only the wild type (susceptible to anticoagulant rodenticides) was encountered.
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fig01: Overview of the questionnaire outcome among pest controllers (A) and the outcome of the analysis of tissue samples of R. norvegicus (B) presented on the map of Dutch postal codes (two digits). On map A, the dark-grey areas represent regions where the presence of resistant rats was suspected. On map B, in the dark-grey areas at least one mutation was discovered, based on tail tissue samples, while in the light-grey areas only the wild type (susceptible to anticoagulant rodenticides) was encountered.

Mentions: In total, 158 questionnaire responses were returned (117 online and 41 as hard copy), and these covered most of the Netherlands. Unfortunately, no farmers participated. The majority of respondents (59%) worked for local governments, while 30% worked for private pest control companies, water boards (6%) or other employers such as recreational parks or golf centres (5%). The major part (82%) did not experience problems with rodent control, while 18% did. However, only 8% of the respondents attributed these problems to emerging rodenticide resistance, while others mentioned other reasons: the availability of other feed sources during the rodent control phase, limited attention for rodent presence or absence of rodent proofing. Eight respondents suspected rodenticide resistance among R. norvegicus in 16 municipalities (Fig. 1A).


Distribution of anticoagulant rodenticide resistance in Rattus norvegicus in the Netherlands according to Vkorc1 mutations.

Meerburg BG, van Gent-Pelzer MP, Schoelitsz B, Esther A, van der Lee TA - Pest Manag. Sci. (2014)

Overview of the questionnaire outcome among pest controllers (A) and the outcome of the analysis of tissue samples of R. norvegicus (B) presented on the map of Dutch postal codes (two digits). On map A, the dark-grey areas represent regions where the presence of resistant rats was suspected. On map B, in the dark-grey areas at least one mutation was discovered, based on tail tissue samples, while in the light-grey areas only the wild type (susceptible to anticoagulant rodenticides) was encountered.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4238836&req=5

fig01: Overview of the questionnaire outcome among pest controllers (A) and the outcome of the analysis of tissue samples of R. norvegicus (B) presented on the map of Dutch postal codes (two digits). On map A, the dark-grey areas represent regions where the presence of resistant rats was suspected. On map B, in the dark-grey areas at least one mutation was discovered, based on tail tissue samples, while in the light-grey areas only the wild type (susceptible to anticoagulant rodenticides) was encountered.
Mentions: In total, 158 questionnaire responses were returned (117 online and 41 as hard copy), and these covered most of the Netherlands. Unfortunately, no farmers participated. The majority of respondents (59%) worked for local governments, while 30% worked for private pest control companies, water boards (6%) or other employers such as recreational parks or golf centres (5%). The major part (82%) did not experience problems with rodent control, while 18% did. However, only 8% of the respondents attributed these problems to emerging rodenticide resistance, while others mentioned other reasons: the availability of other feed sources during the rodent control phase, limited attention for rodent presence or absence of rodent proofing. Eight respondents suspected rodenticide resistance among R. norvegicus in 16 municipalities (Fig. 1A).

Bottom Line: Here, the authors present the results of a survey in the Netherlands where tissue samples and droppings were tested using a newly developed TaqMan PCR test for genotypic variation at codon 139 in the Vkorc1 gene associated with anticoagulant rodenticide resistance.In addition, indications of a clear genetic substructure in the Netherlands were found.As rodenticides should keep their efficacy because they are a last resort in rodent management, more studies are urgently needed that link specific genetic mutations to the efficacy of active substances.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Wageningen UR Livestock Research, Lelystad, The Netherlands.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus