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High-sensitivity CRP is an independent risk factor for all fractures and vertebral fractures in elderly men: the MrOS Sweden study.

Eriksson AL, Movérare-Skrtic S, Ljunggren Ö, Karlsson M, Mellström D, Ohlsson C - J. Bone Miner. Res. (2014)

Bottom Line: Study participants were divided into tertile groups based on hs-CRP level.Femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD) was not associated with hs-CRP, and the predictive role of hs-CRP for fracture risk was essentially unchanged when femoral neck BMD was added to the model (HR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.09-1.72).This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Bone and Arthritis Research, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.

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Forest plot of Cox proportional hazard ratio (HR) and 95% CI of fracture by hs-CRP (highest tertile versus medium and lowest tertiles combined). (A) Adjusted for age. (B) Adjusted for age, height, weight, calcium intake, physical activity, grip strength, cigarette smoking, use of alcohol, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), stroke, diabetes, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, prevalent fractures, and medication use (corticosteroids, statins, thiazide diuretics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), osteoporosis medications, testosterone, antidepressants, hypnotics and sedatives, antiandrogens). (C) Further adjusted for femoral neck sBMD.
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fig01: Forest plot of Cox proportional hazard ratio (HR) and 95% CI of fracture by hs-CRP (highest tertile versus medium and lowest tertiles combined). (A) Adjusted for age. (B) Adjusted for age, height, weight, calcium intake, physical activity, grip strength, cigarette smoking, use of alcohol, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), stroke, diabetes, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, prevalent fractures, and medication use (corticosteroids, statins, thiazide diuretics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), osteoporosis medications, testosterone, antidepressants, hypnotics and sedatives, antiandrogens). (C) Further adjusted for femoral neck sBMD.

Mentions: Cox proportional hazards models demonstrated that high serum hs-CRP was related to an increased risk of first fracture (age-adjusted HR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.10–1.42 per tertile increase in hs-CRP). The fracture risk for subjects in the highest CRP tertile was clearly increased compared with subjects in the lowest tertile (HR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.20–1.97), whereas the fracture risk was similar in the medium CRP tertile compared with the lowest CRP tertile (HR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.85–1.43). Therefore, the lowest and the medium tertiles were pooled into one group in the subsequent analyses. The HR of fracture for the highest tertile of hs-CRP, compared with the lowest and the medium tertiles combined, was 1.48 (95% CI, 1.20–1.82; Fig. 1A).


High-sensitivity CRP is an independent risk factor for all fractures and vertebral fractures in elderly men: the MrOS Sweden study.

Eriksson AL, Movérare-Skrtic S, Ljunggren Ö, Karlsson M, Mellström D, Ohlsson C - J. Bone Miner. Res. (2014)

Forest plot of Cox proportional hazard ratio (HR) and 95% CI of fracture by hs-CRP (highest tertile versus medium and lowest tertiles combined). (A) Adjusted for age. (B) Adjusted for age, height, weight, calcium intake, physical activity, grip strength, cigarette smoking, use of alcohol, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), stroke, diabetes, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, prevalent fractures, and medication use (corticosteroids, statins, thiazide diuretics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), osteoporosis medications, testosterone, antidepressants, hypnotics and sedatives, antiandrogens). (C) Further adjusted for femoral neck sBMD.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4238816&req=5

fig01: Forest plot of Cox proportional hazard ratio (HR) and 95% CI of fracture by hs-CRP (highest tertile versus medium and lowest tertiles combined). (A) Adjusted for age. (B) Adjusted for age, height, weight, calcium intake, physical activity, grip strength, cigarette smoking, use of alcohol, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), stroke, diabetes, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, prevalent fractures, and medication use (corticosteroids, statins, thiazide diuretics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), osteoporosis medications, testosterone, antidepressants, hypnotics and sedatives, antiandrogens). (C) Further adjusted for femoral neck sBMD.
Mentions: Cox proportional hazards models demonstrated that high serum hs-CRP was related to an increased risk of first fracture (age-adjusted HR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.10–1.42 per tertile increase in hs-CRP). The fracture risk for subjects in the highest CRP tertile was clearly increased compared with subjects in the lowest tertile (HR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.20–1.97), whereas the fracture risk was similar in the medium CRP tertile compared with the lowest CRP tertile (HR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.85–1.43). Therefore, the lowest and the medium tertiles were pooled into one group in the subsequent analyses. The HR of fracture for the highest tertile of hs-CRP, compared with the lowest and the medium tertiles combined, was 1.48 (95% CI, 1.20–1.82; Fig. 1A).

Bottom Line: Study participants were divided into tertile groups based on hs-CRP level.Femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD) was not associated with hs-CRP, and the predictive role of hs-CRP for fracture risk was essentially unchanged when femoral neck BMD was added to the model (HR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.09-1.72).This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Bone and Arthritis Research, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus