Limits...
Kartogenin induces cartilage-like tissue formation in tendon-bone junction.

Zhang J, Wang JH - Bone Res (2014)

Bottom Line: When injected into intact rat patellar tendons in vivo, KGN induced cartilage-like tissue formation in the injected area.Similarly, when KGN was injected into experimentally injured rat Achilles TBJs, wound healing in the TBJs was enhanced, as evidenced by the formation of extensive cartilage-like tissues.These results suggest that KGN may be used as an effective cell-free clinical therapy to enhance the healing of injured TBJs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MechanoBiology Laboratory, Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery, Bioengineering, Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, and Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA.

ABSTRACT
Tendon-bone junctions (TBJs) are frequently injured, especially in athletic settings. Healing of TBJ injuries is slow and is often repaired with scar tissue formation that compromises normal function. This study explored the feasibility of using kartogenin (KGN), a biocompound, to enhance the healing of injured TBJs. We first determined the effects of KGN on the proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and patellar tendon stem/progenitor cells (PTSCs) in vitro. KGN enhanced cell proliferation in both cell types in a concentration-dependent manner and induced chondrogenic differentiation of stem cells, as demonstrated by high expression levels of chondrogenic markers aggrecan, collagen II and Sox-9. Besides, KGN induced the formation of cartilage-like tissues in cell cultures, as observed through the staining of abundant proteoglycans, collagen II and osteocalcin. When injected into intact rat patellar tendons in vivo, KGN induced cartilage-like tissue formation in the injected area. Similarly, when KGN was injected into experimentally injured rat Achilles TBJs, wound healing in the TBJs was enhanced, as evidenced by the formation of extensive cartilage-like tissues. These results suggest that KGN may be used as an effective cell-free clinical therapy to enhance the healing of injured TBJs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Chondrogenic differentiation of rabbit BMSCs and PTSCs cultured in vitro in medium containing KGN. BMSCs and PTSCs were grown in medium with various concentrations of KGN (1 nmol·L−1-5 μmol·L−1). The cells without KGN treatment were used as a control. After being treated for 2 weeks in culture, the cells were immunostained with anti-collagen II and anti-osteocalcin antibodies to determine chondrogenic differentiation. Nuclei were stained with Hoechst fluorochrome 33342 (blue). Chondrogenic differentiation in both cell types increased after the addition of KGN in a dose-dependent manner. Bars=100 μm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4237211&req=5

Figure 4: Chondrogenic differentiation of rabbit BMSCs and PTSCs cultured in vitro in medium containing KGN. BMSCs and PTSCs were grown in medium with various concentrations of KGN (1 nmol·L−1-5 μmol·L−1). The cells without KGN treatment were used as a control. After being treated for 2 weeks in culture, the cells were immunostained with anti-collagen II and anti-osteocalcin antibodies to determine chondrogenic differentiation. Nuclei were stained with Hoechst fluorochrome 33342 (blue). Chondrogenic differentiation in both cell types increased after the addition of KGN in a dose-dependent manner. Bars=100 μm.

Mentions: Further, immunocytochemical analyses of BMSCs and PTSCs (Figure 4) treated with KGN showed a clear dose-dependent increase in both collagen II and osteocalcin expression, with maximum expression levels at 5 μmol·L−1 KGN.


Kartogenin induces cartilage-like tissue formation in tendon-bone junction.

Zhang J, Wang JH - Bone Res (2014)

Chondrogenic differentiation of rabbit BMSCs and PTSCs cultured in vitro in medium containing KGN. BMSCs and PTSCs were grown in medium with various concentrations of KGN (1 nmol·L−1-5 μmol·L−1). The cells without KGN treatment were used as a control. After being treated for 2 weeks in culture, the cells were immunostained with anti-collagen II and anti-osteocalcin antibodies to determine chondrogenic differentiation. Nuclei were stained with Hoechst fluorochrome 33342 (blue). Chondrogenic differentiation in both cell types increased after the addition of KGN in a dose-dependent manner. Bars=100 μm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4237211&req=5

Figure 4: Chondrogenic differentiation of rabbit BMSCs and PTSCs cultured in vitro in medium containing KGN. BMSCs and PTSCs were grown in medium with various concentrations of KGN (1 nmol·L−1-5 μmol·L−1). The cells without KGN treatment were used as a control. After being treated for 2 weeks in culture, the cells were immunostained with anti-collagen II and anti-osteocalcin antibodies to determine chondrogenic differentiation. Nuclei were stained with Hoechst fluorochrome 33342 (blue). Chondrogenic differentiation in both cell types increased after the addition of KGN in a dose-dependent manner. Bars=100 μm.
Mentions: Further, immunocytochemical analyses of BMSCs and PTSCs (Figure 4) treated with KGN showed a clear dose-dependent increase in both collagen II and osteocalcin expression, with maximum expression levels at 5 μmol·L−1 KGN.

Bottom Line: When injected into intact rat patellar tendons in vivo, KGN induced cartilage-like tissue formation in the injected area.Similarly, when KGN was injected into experimentally injured rat Achilles TBJs, wound healing in the TBJs was enhanced, as evidenced by the formation of extensive cartilage-like tissues.These results suggest that KGN may be used as an effective cell-free clinical therapy to enhance the healing of injured TBJs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MechanoBiology Laboratory, Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery, Bioengineering, Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, and Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA.

ABSTRACT
Tendon-bone junctions (TBJs) are frequently injured, especially in athletic settings. Healing of TBJ injuries is slow and is often repaired with scar tissue formation that compromises normal function. This study explored the feasibility of using kartogenin (KGN), a biocompound, to enhance the healing of injured TBJs. We first determined the effects of KGN on the proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and patellar tendon stem/progenitor cells (PTSCs) in vitro. KGN enhanced cell proliferation in both cell types in a concentration-dependent manner and induced chondrogenic differentiation of stem cells, as demonstrated by high expression levels of chondrogenic markers aggrecan, collagen II and Sox-9. Besides, KGN induced the formation of cartilage-like tissues in cell cultures, as observed through the staining of abundant proteoglycans, collagen II and osteocalcin. When injected into intact rat patellar tendons in vivo, KGN induced cartilage-like tissue formation in the injected area. Similarly, when KGN was injected into experimentally injured rat Achilles TBJs, wound healing in the TBJs was enhanced, as evidenced by the formation of extensive cartilage-like tissues. These results suggest that KGN may be used as an effective cell-free clinical therapy to enhance the healing of injured TBJs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus